Finch's next three films saw him support notable female stars: Sophia Loren in Judith (1966), Melina Mercouri in 10:30 P.M. Summer (1966) and Julie Christie in Far from the Madding Crowd (1967). He was reunited with Aldrich for The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968). The Red Tent (1970) was an expensive international adventure film, with Finch as Umberto Nobile.
He did radio acting work with Hugh Denison's BSA Players (for Broadcasting Service Association, later to become Macquarie Players). He came to the attention of Australian Broadcasting Commission radio drama producer Lawrence H. Cecil, who was to act as his coach and mentor throughout 1939 and 1940. He was "Chris" in the Children's Session and the first Muddle-Headed Wombat.
“Peter and the team offer professionally run, competitive golf at the best courses in the UK. It has been a great way for me to play the top venues under tournament pressure whilst meeting people I now class as friends. A tight ship is run too, with no questionable handicaps and scores, which are well within reason, picking up prizes is a refreshing change. Since my involvement from 2014, you can see the tour growing naturally year on year and given the schedule who can see it stopping. Every event is top class – and glad to be apart of it.”
During his war service Finch was given leave to act in radio, theatre and film. He appeared in a number of propaganda shorts, including Another Threshold (1942), These Stars Are Mine (1943), While There is Still Time (1943) and South West Pacific (1943), the latter for Ken G. Hall. He also appeared in two of the few Australian feature films made during the war, The Rats of Tobruk (1944) and the less distinguished Red Sky at Morning (1944).

Mark’s career thus far has been one of huge progression; he started out coaching at Clifton Hill Driving Range, then began to review equipment and give online lessons on his YouTube channel. Nowadays, many look to Mark’s channel for unbiased golf reviews still, but predominantly to watch him and ‘The Muppets’ take on courses in the UK, Europe and America, inspiring golfers of all abilities to travel the world and play these famous courses.
During his war service Finch was given leave to act in radio, theatre and film. He appeared in a number of propaganda shorts, including Another Threshold (1942), These Stars Are Mine (1943), While There is Still Time (1943) and South West Pacific (1943), the latter for Ken G. Hall. He also appeared in two of the few Australian feature films made during the war, The Rats of Tobruk (1944) and the less distinguished Red Sky at Morning (1944).
He had a small role as an Australian prisoner of war in The Wooden Horse (1950), the third most popular film at the British box office in 1950. His performance as a Pole in Daphne Laureola led to his casting as a Polish soldier in The Miniver Story, the sequel to the wartime morale boosting film Mrs. Miniver; unlike its predecessor, it was poorly received critically.[21][22]
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