the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.

What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”

PGA Championship: With his T5 finish at the PGA Championship, finishing three strokes behind champion Justin Thomas, continued to be a top-five machine in major championships, recording his seventh such finish in 32 starts. Made a furious Sunday rally, with six birdies, including four in a row on Nos 12-15, but pars on The Green Mile (Nos. 16-18) left him a few short of his friend, Justin Thomas.


As for the workouts he’s doing, DeChambeau is continuing work he’s done with Greg Roskopf, whose system focuses on making people stronger where they are weak, particularly at extraneous points in their muscular system. In other words, there are likely points in the golf swing — in various golf movements — where DeChambeau isn’t as strong as he could be, hence the more work and weight. If he has already ascended to 220 in a matter of weeks, 230 should follow soon. Stay tuned.
Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
At the PGA Championship, Fowler carded 74-69-75-68 to finish with a six-over par total of 286, in a tie for 51st place. Early on the third day Fowler rocketed up the leaderboard with three birdies in the first five holes only to falter later in the round with two triple bogeys, effectively ending his hopes of a first major championship and PGA Tour win.[20]
Lowry started for Leeds in the Football League Trophy Northern Area Final, second leg game against Carlisle United, in which the game was lost with Lowry missing the decisive penalty in sudden death in the penalty shootout. After the game it appeared as though Lowry was attacked by a set of Carlisle supporters who had invaded the pitch.[11] After starting every game for Leeds Lowry was dropped from the Leeds squad for the match against Brentford after suffering an injury, before returning to Villa when his loan spell ended. On 25 March 2010 Lowry re-signed for Leeds for a second loan spell, with his loan lasting until the end of the season.[12] Lowry started at left back for Leeds against Norwich City on his return to the club, a match Leeds went on to lose 1–0 in injury time.[13] Lowry didn't overley impress the Leeds fans in his loan spell at Leeds, with him being mostly played out of position at Left back for the entire spell, he was substituted for Jonathan Howson in the final game of the season against Bristol Rovers with 1–0 down at the time, but his loan spell ended on a high as Leeds were promoted in 2nd place after scoring two goals to go on and beat Bristol Rovers and secure promotion to The Championship.[14]
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
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