What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]

Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.

Enjoyed a stellar rookie season, with seven top-10 finishes and a 32nd-place finish in the FedExCup standings that led to him winning PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year honors. Finished inside the top 30 on the money list to qualify for the Masters and the U.S. Open. Played in first three Playoff events, slipping from 21st to 32nd and out of the TOUR Championship.
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.
Lowry started his youth career with Australian club ECU Joondalup. He signed for Aston Villa in February 2005 along with fellow Australian Chris Herd.[3] Lowry made nine appearances for Aston Villa Reserves in the 2006–07 season, mainly coming near the end of the campaign. Lowry was also part of the squad that won the HKFC International Soccer Sevens in May 2007. In June 2007, Lowry signed a 12-month deal to his contract.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
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