In February 2010, Fowler finished second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open with a score of 15-under-par at the TPC of Scottsdale course. In June, Fowler notched his third PGA Tour runner-up finish at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Fowler entered the final round in the lead, but shot a 73 to finish behind Justin Rose, who recorded his first PGA Tour victory. This performance took Fowler into the top 50 of the Official World Golf Ranking.
In September, he signed a clothing deal with Puma.[11] In the same month, he was also chosen as a captain's pick for the U.S. Ryder Cup team.[12] At age 21 years and 9 months when the matches began, Fowler became the youngest U.S. Ryder Cup player of all time, and only European Sergio García was younger when he made his Ryder Cup debut in 1999. Fowler forfeited a hole during foursomes competition on the first match day because of a rules violation, by taking a permissible free drop from muddy conditions in an improper location, a mistake U.S. captain Corey Pavin attributed to Fowler's inexperience.[13] On the final day of the competition in his singles match against Edoardo Molinari, Fowler birdied the last 4 holes to halve the match after having been 4 down after 12 holes.[14]
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Lowry started for Leeds in the Football League Trophy Northern Area Final, second leg game against Carlisle United, in which the game was lost with Lowry missing the decisive penalty in sudden death in the penalty shootout. After the game it appeared as though Lowry was attacked by a set of Carlisle supporters who had invaded the pitch.[11] After starting every game for Leeds Lowry was dropped from the Leeds squad for the match against Brentford after suffering an injury, before returning to Villa when his loan spell ended. On 25 March 2010 Lowry re-signed for Leeds for a second loan spell, with his loan lasting until the end of the season.[12] Lowry started at left back for Leeds against Norwich City on his return to the club, a match Leeds went on to lose 1–0 in injury time.[13] Lowry didn't overley impress the Leeds fans in his loan spell at Leeds, with him being mostly played out of position at Left back for the entire spell, he was substituted for Jonathan Howson in the final game of the season against Bristol Rovers with 1–0 down at the time, but his loan spell ended on a high as Leeds were promoted in 2nd place after scoring two goals to go on and beat Bristol Rovers and secure promotion to The Championship.[14]

OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.

Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]

Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
Lowry won for the first time as a professional in 2012, at the Portugal Masters in October. He shot a 67 to tie for the lead with the Englishman Ross Fisher, who made bogey on the final hole after missing a four-foot putt. The victory lifted Lowry back into the Official World Golf Ranking top 100 and made him eligible to compete in the WGC-HSBC Champions.[citation needed]
In July 2011, Fowler tied the 54-hole lead at the AT&T National, but an early double bogey on Sunday derailed his opportunity for his first PGA Tour win. Two weeks later Fowler finished tied for 5th in The Open Championship at Royal St George's.[18] In August, Fowler finished in a tie for second at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational behind winner Adam Scott, lifting him to 28 in the world rankings.[19]
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season. 
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