DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
After Lowry's loan spell at Leeds was coming to an end, on 11 May he signed a new two-year contract extension at Aston Villa. It was a remarkable few days for Lowry, he was promoted with Leeds, received a call up to Australia's World Cup Squad and on the same day he signed a new two-year deal with Villa.[15] Despite signing a contract with the club, Leeds United was considering re-signing him for the second time ahead of the 2010–11 season, but never happened.[16]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
Lowry started his youth career with Australian club ECU Joondalup. He signed for Aston Villa in February 2005 along with fellow Australian Chris Herd.[3] Lowry made nine appearances for Aston Villa Reserves in the 2006–07 season, mainly coming near the end of the campaign. Lowry was also part of the squad that won the HKFC International Soccer Sevens in May 2007. In June 2007, Lowry signed a 12-month deal to his contract.

On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]


All of DeChambeau's irons and wedges[24] are cut to exactly the same length: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm). Their lie and bounce angle are also the same; only the lofts are different. In addition to the single-length concept, his clubs are unusual for their extremely upright lie angle. [25] DeChambeau keeps the club on the same plane throughout his swing and does not turn his wrists during his swing.[26] In 2011, at the suggestion of his instructor Mike Schy, DeChambeau switched to JumboMax Grips, the largest grips commercially available. The larger grips allow DeChambeau to hold the grips in his palms and not his fingers.
On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]
BMW Championship: After entering the final round of the BMW Championship in a second-place tie with Jason Day (five strokes behind Marc Leishman), recorded a 4-under 67 to finish T2, his 11th career runner-up on the PGA TOUR. Week was highlighted by a career-best, six consecutive birdies in the first round on Nos. 12-17. Chipped in from 64 feet on the 17th.
On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]
5-time PGA Tour winner Bryson DeChambeau is a master of precision under pressure and one of the youngest international champions on golf’s global stage. At only 25 years old, he has already cemented his sport legacy with his innovative approach to the game. Nicknamed the “golf scientist,” DeChambeau ensures that physics are on his side. He is the only golfer on the PGA Tour with irons and wedges that measure one length, 37.5 inches, and one of the only ones who has mastered “The Science of Swing."
Kolon Korea Open: Won his first tournament as a professional, the Kolon Korea Open on the OneAsia Tour, when he rolled to a six-stroke win over Rory McIlroy at Woo Jeong Hills CC in early October. He took control of the tournament in the third round when he shot an 8-under 63. He followed that with a 3-under 68 Sunday. The victory was worth a little under $250,000.
Masters Tournament: Finished runner-up at the Masters, one stroke behind Patrick Reed, for his best result at the event. For the first time in eight starts at Augusta National, recorded four par-or-better rounds (70-72-65-67). Earned his third runner-up in a major (2nd/2018 Masters Tournament, T2/2014 The Open Championship, T2/2014 U.S. Open) and third top-five in the last four (2nd/2018 Masters Tournament, T5/2017 Open Championship, T5/2017 U.S. Open). With third-round 65, was one of just four players to post a bogey-free round during the week (Rory McIlroy/65, Jon Rahm/65, Si Woo Kim/65) with all four occurring in the final round.

World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship: In his fourth consecutive start at the World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship, fought his way to the semifinals Sunday morning against Ernie Els. Got off to a hot start, leading for seven of the first nine holes. With a shift of momentum, Els battled back and won three consecutive holes (Nos. 10-12) to gain a 2-up lead. Following an eagle and par on Nos. 13 and 14, he squared up the match. An Els birdie-3 at No. 18 sent the match to extra holes. A birdie-3 at the 19th hole (No. 1) gave him the upset win over Els.


BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 36 in the FedExCup standings, with his T39 finish at Conway Farms outside Chicago leading to a final ranking of No. 38. Advanced to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola in 2012 (finished No. 28 in the FedExCup), but other three seasons led to near misses of cracking the top 30 in the FedExCup (No. 43 in 2011 and No. 32 in 2010).
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Fowler has three tattoos. One is a block "G" near his left elbow in honor of Georgia Veach, the daughter of a Seattle pastor and friend. Georgia was diagnosed with lissencephaly. Fowler got the tattoo just before the 2015 Presidents Cup.[47] The second is from January 2016 and contains the name Yutaka Tanaka (Rickie's grandfather) in Japanese script on his left biceps.[48] The third tattoo came just weeks after playing at the 2016 Summer Olympics and is of the Olympic symbols.[49]

On June 16, Fowler carded a round of 65 at Erin Hills to take the first round lead at the 2017 U.S. Open. Fowler equaled the lowest first round score at the U.S. Open and led by one stroke from Paul Casey and Xander Schauffele. He followed this up with a one over par 73 in the second round to fall out of the lead by one stroke, held by four other players. He shot 68-72 over the weekend to finish in a tie for fifth place. This gave Fowler his sixth top-5 finish in a major, but he is still yet to win. Fowler started the PGA Championship with a 2-under 69 which was two strokes behind the leaders. After rounds of 70-73, he closed out the year's last major with a 4-under 67, including a run of four consecutive birdies on holes 12 through 15. Despite his solid finish, Fowler ended up tied for fifth and was 3 strokes behind the winner, and friend, Justin Thomas. It was his seventh top-5 major finish, meaning he's had multiple top-5 finishes at every major.

At the first FedEx Cup playoff event of the season, The Barclays, Fowler went into the final round leading the event by one stroke. He endured a difficult final round, shooting a two-over-par 74. His challenge was ended with a double-bogey at the 16th hole that put him four strokes behind playing partner Patrick Reed. He went on to finish T7, three strokes behind the winner Reed. As a result of this, Fowler also failed to secure his automatic Ryder Cup spot, which he would have done with a top-three finish. Fowler moved up from 28th to 16th in the FedEx Cup standings with this result.

On 23 November 2011, Lowry was again loaned out to play in the Championship, this time to Millwall until 3 January 2012. He followed Aston Villa team-mate Nathan Baker who also signed on loan for Millwall two days earlier.[19] Lowry made his Millwall debut three days later, where he played 90 minutes, in a 0–0 draw against Crystal Palace.[20] His impressive display at Millwall soon earned a loan extension.[21] Weeks later on 13 January 2012, Lowry was sent-off in the 22nd minutes after stamping on Nikola Žigić, which saw Millwall lose 6–0.[22] Three years on after signing for Birmingham City, Lowry stated, quoting: "Whatever club I play for I fully commit to that club at the time. I play with my heart on my sleeve. Sometimes in the past I have gone overboard but I was a younger player then, I have learned a lot from these types of experiences. But I am an aggressive player, that’s the way I like to play and I can’t change the way I play. I will use my experience now and be a bit more clever."'[23]
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