Wells Fargo Championship: Made birdie-3 on the first extra hole (No. 18) to defeat Rory McIlroy and D.A. Points at the Wells Fargo Championship for his first TOUR win. Improved to 1-1 in playoffs (lost to Troy Matteson, 2009 Frys.com Open). The playoff was the fifth at the Wells Fargo Championship. At the age of 23 years, 4 months, 23 days, became the third player to make the Wells Fargo Championship his first PGA TOUR win (Anthony Kim in 2008 and McIlroy in 2010). Became the third-youngest winner of the event, behind McIlroy (20 years, 11 months, 28 days) and Kim (22, 10, 15). His win came in his 72nd start on TOUR and was his 16th top-10 finish. Opening-round 66 is the lowest start by a winner of the Wells Fargo Championship. Won in his third start at the Wells Fargo Championship (T6 in 2010 and T16 in 2011).
In February 2010, Fowler finished second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open with a score of 15-under-par at the TPC of Scottsdale course. In June, Fowler notched his third PGA Tour runner-up finish at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Fowler entered the final round in the lead, but shot a 73 to finish behind Justin Rose, who recorded his first PGA Tour victory. This performance took Fowler into the top 50 of the Official World Golf Ranking.
A better look at my @cobragolf proto irons…second and third pics are top down view of 8 (40°) and 4 (24°) iron…we started working on these back in January…I wanted an old school look (thin/straight top line and no offset) while keeping the benefits of the sole and weight behind the sweet spot (tungsten plugs) these are all hand milled stainless heads…currently working on a pvd finish for the final version…stay tuned👌
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace. 

Waste Management Phoenix Open: Won fifth PGA TOUR title at the Waste Management Phoenix Open in his 220th career start at the age of 30 years, 1 month, 21 days. Began the final round with a four-shot lead and won by two strokes after recording a double bogey and triple bogey en route to a closing 3-over 74. Became the first player since 1983 to win with both a double bogey and triple bogey or worse in the final round. Triple bogey came at No. 11 at TPC Scottsdale after he chipped his ball into the water and received an additional penalty when the ball rolled back into the water after he had placed it back into play. Marked the second time of seven occasions he converted a 54-hole lead to victory.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
Lowry made his Leyton Orient debut, playing as a left-back position, in the opening game of the season, which saw Leyton Orient lost 2–1 to Chesterfield.[47] Since his debut, Lowry established himself in the left-back position in the first half of the season despite being sidelined with suspension[48] and fitness concern that saw him out for two matches.[49] Following his return to the first team, Lowry played in the central-defense between December and March until he dropped from the first team throughout March.[50] Lowry went on to make his first team return throughout 2014–15 season, making thirty-four appearance in his first season at Leyton Orient.[51]

At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.


The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
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