The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
In February 2010, Fowler finished second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open with a score of 15-under-par at the TPC of Scottsdale course. In June, Fowler notched his third PGA Tour runner-up finish at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Fowler entered the final round in the lead, but shot a 73 to finish behind Justin Rose, who recorded his first PGA Tour victory. This performance took Fowler into the top 50 of the Official World Golf Ranking.
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event of the season, The Barclays, Fowler went into the final round leading the event by one stroke. He endured a difficult final round, shooting a two-over-par 74. His challenge was ended with a double-bogey at the 16th hole that put him four strokes behind playing partner Patrick Reed. He went on to finish T7, three strokes behind the winner Reed. As a result of this, Fowler also failed to secure his automatic Ryder Cup spot, which he would have done with a top-three finish. Fowler moved up from 28th to 16th in the FedEx Cup standings with this result.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Lowry made his Leyton Orient debut, playing as a left-back position, in the opening game of the season, which saw Leyton Orient lost 2–1 to Chesterfield.[47] Since his debut, Lowry established himself in the left-back position in the first half of the season despite being sidelined with suspension[48] and fitness concern that saw him out for two matches.[49] Following his return to the first team, Lowry played in the central-defense between December and March until he dropped from the first team throughout March.[50] Lowry went on to make his first team return throughout 2014–15 season, making thirty-four appearance in his first season at Leyton Orient.[51]

Lowry started his youth career with Australian club ECU Joondalup. He signed for Aston Villa in February 2005 along with fellow Australian Chris Herd.[3] Lowry made nine appearances for Aston Villa Reserves in the 2006–07 season, mainly coming near the end of the campaign. Lowry was also part of the squad that won the HKFC International Soccer Sevens in May 2007. In June 2007, Lowry signed a 12-month deal to his contract.
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
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