PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
On 28 January 2010, Lowry agreed a deal which would take him on a loan to Leeds United until 13 March 2010, joining his fellow Australian international teammates Patrick Kisnorbo and Neil Kilkenny.[9] He made his debut for Leeds against Colchester United, playing left back for Leeds.[10] After an impressive debut, Lowry suffered a minor injury and had to be substituted and replaced by Bradley Johnson after 70 minutes. After missing the FA Cup replay against Tottenham Hotspur due to not being eligible, Lowry returned to the Leeds starting lineup in the following game against Hartlepool United.
Lowry made his professional debut in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League in an away fixture at Rapid Vienna.[4] On 17 September 2009, Lowry signed a three-month loan deal with Football League Championship side Plymouth Argyle.[5][6] Lowry made his Plymouth Argyle debut on 19 September 2009, playing 90 minutes, in a 3–1 loss against Newcastle United.[7] He played 13 league games for Plymouth during his loan spell, where he impressed many and was recalled by Villa who required Lowry's services as cover after some injuries to defenders.[8]
Lowry won for the first time as a professional in 2012, at the Portugal Masters in October. He shot a 67 to tie for the lead with the Englishman Ross Fisher, who made bogey on the final hole after missing a four-foot putt. The victory lifted Lowry back into the Official World Golf Ranking top 100 and made him eligible to compete in the WGC-HSBC Champions.[citation needed]
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
In 2008, Fowler repeated as Sunnehanna Amateur champion. In the first round of the U.S. Open, Fowler shot a −1 (70) and was in a tie for 7th place. He was one of three amateurs to make the cut, along with Derek Fathauer and Michael Thompson. He ended the tournament tied for 60th. In October 2008 Fowler played on the Eisenhower Trophy team that finished second. He was the leading individual player. 
×