OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.


The Open Championship: Playing in the final group Sunday for the second straight time in a major championship, made a solid bid for the title, at The Open Championship, with a final-round, 5-under 67. Along with Garcia, finished second to Rory McIlroy by two strokes. With his finish at Royal Liverpool GC, became the only player of the season to claim top-five finishes in the year's first three major championships. He also became the first player to claim top-10 finishes in a season's first three majors since Woods achieved the feat in 2005. His T2 at Royal Liverpool supplanted his previous-best Open Championship finish (in four starts) of T5 in 2011. Rounds of 69-69-68-67 made him the only player in the field to post all four rounds in the 60s.
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In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
On June 16, Fowler carded a round of 65 at Erin Hills to take the first round lead at the 2017 U.S. Open. Fowler equaled the lowest first round score at the U.S. Open and led by one stroke from Paul Casey and Xander Schauffele. He followed this up with a one over par 73 in the second round to fall out of the lead by one stroke, held by four other players. He shot 68-72 over the weekend to finish in a tie for fifth place. This gave Fowler his sixth top-5 finish in a major, but he is still yet to win. Fowler started the PGA Championship with a 2-under 69 which was two strokes behind the leaders. After rounds of 70-73, he closed out the year's last major with a 4-under 67, including a run of four consecutive birdies on holes 12 through 15. Despite his solid finish, Fowler ended up tied for fifth and was 3 strokes behind the winner, and friend, Justin Thomas. It was his seventh top-5 major finish, meaning he's had multiple top-5 finishes at every major.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]

OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]

Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship: Held off final-round charges from Thomas Pieters, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson to win the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, marking his second European Tour title. The victory was the first at the event by an American since Chris DiMarco won the inaugural event in 2006. Final-round highlights included a holed bunker shot on the eighth hole (which helped propel him to a three-stroke cushion at the turn), a chip-in for birdie on the 17th hole and then a par on the last to hold off Pieters by one stroke.
BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 36 in the FedExCup standings, with his T39 finish at Conway Farms outside Chicago leading to a final ranking of No. 38. Advanced to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola in 2012 (finished No. 28 in the FedExCup), but other three seasons led to near misses of cracking the top 30 in the FedExCup (No. 43 in 2011 and No. 32 in 2010).
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]

Lowry made his professional debut in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League in an away fixture at Rapid Vienna.[4] On 17 September 2009, Lowry signed a three-month loan deal with Football League Championship side Plymouth Argyle.[5][6] Lowry made his Plymouth Argyle debut on 19 September 2009, playing 90 minutes, in a 3–1 loss against Newcastle United.[7] He played 13 league games for Plymouth during his loan spell, where he impressed many and was recalled by Villa who required Lowry's services as cover after some injuries to defenders.[8]

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