With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 36 in the FedExCup standings, with his T39 finish at Conway Farms outside Chicago leading to a final ranking of No. 38. Advanced to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola in 2012 (finished No. 28 in the FedExCup), but other three seasons led to near misses of cracking the top 30 in the FedExCup (No. 43 in 2011 and No. 32 in 2010).
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.

Fowler has three tattoos. One is a block "G" near his left elbow in honor of Georgia Veach, the daughter of a Seattle pastor and friend. Georgia was diagnosed with lissencephaly. Fowler got the tattoo just before the 2015 Presidents Cup.[47] The second is from January 2016 and contains the name Yutaka Tanaka (Rickie's grandfather) in Japanese script on his left biceps.[48] The third tattoo came just weeks after playing at the 2016 Summer Olympics and is of the Olympic symbols.[49]


On August 26, 2018, he won The Northern Trust for his first playoff victory; in the process, he established a new record for the tournament when held at the Ridgewood Country Club, with a score of 266, besting the old Ridgewood record of 270, which was set in 2014 by Hunter Mahan.[17] The following week, he won at the Dell Technologies Championship played at TPC Boston in Norton, Massachusetts, with a final score of −16, two shots clear of Justin Rose. This put him over 2000 points ahead of the second place player, Dustin Johnson, in the FedEx Cup rankings. This margin secured him top seeding at The Tour Championship, regardless of his finish at the BMW Championship. This also marked his fourth win on tour, third for the year, and second during the playoffs.[18] At the Tour Championship, DeChambeau finished 19th out of 30 participants. As a result, he fell to 3rd in the FedEx Cup, winning $2,000,000.[19]
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
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Hero World Challenge: After beginning the final round seven strokes out of the lead, closed with a tournament-record, personal-best 11-under 61 to win the Hero World Challenge by four strokes over Charley Hoffman. With a winning score of 18-under 270, won at the age of 28 years, 11 months and 20 days. His 61 topped the previous Hero World Challenge course record of 62, set by Albany resident Justin Rose during the final round in 2015. Prior to his 61, the previous low final-round score by a Hero World Challenge winner was 64, set on three occasions and most recently by Luke Donald in 2005. Opened his final round with seven birdies before making his first par on the par-4 eighth hole. No player has had as long a streak of birdies in an official PGA TOUR event to open a round since Joe Durant started round four of the 2005 Honda Classic with seven in a row. Added a birdie on the ninth hole to make the turn with an 8-under 28, turning a seven-stroke deficit into a two-stroke lead. His final round included 11 birdies, two more than his benchmark of nine birdies in official PGA TOUR events (final round of the Quicken Loans National in 2017). Finished the week at Albany Golf Club with 30 birdies, three more than his highest total in official PGA TOUR events (27 – 2017 Houston Open). Recorded his sixth top-six finish at the event in his sixth start (1/2017, T3/2016, 3/2015, T6/2014, T4/2012, T6/2011).

PGA Championship: With his T5 finish at the PGA Championship, finishing three strokes behind champion Justin Thomas, continued to be a top-five machine in major championships, recording his seventh such finish in 32 starts. Made a furious Sunday rally, with six birdies, including four in a row on Nos 12-15, but pars on The Green Mile (Nos. 16-18) left him a few short of his friend, Justin Thomas.


In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”

Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).
Kolon Korea Open: Won his first tournament as a professional, the Kolon Korea Open on the OneAsia Tour, when he rolled to a six-stroke win over Rory McIlroy at Woo Jeong Hills CC in early October. He took control of the tournament in the third round when he shot an 8-under 63. He followed that with a 3-under 68 Sunday. The victory was worth a little under $250,000.
Lowry made his Leyton Orient debut, playing as a left-back position, in the opening game of the season, which saw Leyton Orient lost 2–1 to Chesterfield.[47] Since his debut, Lowry established himself in the left-back position in the first half of the season despite being sidelined with suspension[48] and fitness concern that saw him out for two matches.[49] Following his return to the first team, Lowry played in the central-defense between December and March until he dropped from the first team throughout March.[50] Lowry went on to make his first team return throughout 2014–15 season, making thirty-four appearance in his first season at Leyton Orient.[51]
The Open Championship: Playing in the final group Sunday for the second straight time in a major championship, made a solid bid for the title, at The Open Championship, with a final-round, 5-under 67. Along with Garcia, finished second to Rory McIlroy by two strokes. With his finish at Royal Liverpool GC, became the only player of the season to claim top-five finishes in the year's first three major championships. He also became the first player to claim top-10 finishes in a season's first three majors since Woods achieved the feat in 2005. His T2 at Royal Liverpool supplanted his previous-best Open Championship finish (in four starts) of T5 in 2011. Rounds of 69-69-68-67 made him the only player in the field to post all four rounds in the 60s.

In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2] 
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