As for the workouts he’s doing, DeChambeau is continuing work he’s done with Greg Roskopf, whose system focuses on making people stronger where they are weak, particularly at extraneous points in their muscular system. In other words, there are likely points in the golf swing — in various golf movements — where DeChambeau isn’t as strong as he could be, hence the more work and weight. If he has already ascended to 220 in a matter of weeks, 230 should follow soon. Stay tuned.

Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Fowler's first PGA Tour event as a professional was the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open where he finished tied for seventh.[8] His second PGA Tour event was at the Frys.com Open played at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. He finished tied for second after losing to Troy Matteson in a three-way playoff that included Jamie Lovemark. Fowler's score of 18-under-par included a hole-in-one on the fifth hole in his final round. Fowler also notched an eagle in each of his four rounds.[9]
Shell Houston Open: After opening with an 8-under 64 for a one-stroke lead on day one, added rounds of 71-67-70 to finish T3 at the Shell Houston Open. Erased a seven-shot deficit in the third round and started the final round three shots behind 54-hole leader Sung Kang, but a final-round 70 saw him finish four strokes behind winner Russell Henley. With 27 birdies on the week (tied for most with Henley), marked his most birdies in a single event.
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
Shane Thomas Lowry (born 12 June 1989) is an Australian footballer who plays as a defender for Al Ahli.[2] His previous clubs include Millwall, Perth Glory, Aston Villa, Plymouth Argyle, Leeds United, Sheffield United, Leyton Orient and Birmingham City. Born in Perth, Western Australia, he represented the Republic of Ireland under-17s and under-21s before choosing to pursue his senior international career with Australia.

DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

Categories: 1989 birthsLiving peopleAustralian soccer playersRepublic of Ireland association footballersAustralian people of Irish descentQatar Stars League playersAston Villa F.C. playersLeeds United F.C. playersPlymouth Argyle F.C. playersSheffield United F.C. playersMillwall F.C. playersLeyton Orient F.C. playersBirmingham City F.C. playersPerth Glory FC playersAl Ahli SC (Doha) playersEnglish Football League playersExpatriate footballers in QatarPeople from Perth, Western AustraliaRepublic of Ireland youth international footballersRepublic of Ireland under-21 international footballersAssociation football defenders
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.

Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”

The Open Championship: Enjoyed his best finish among seven major championship starts, with a T5 at The Open Championship at Royal St. George's. Opened with three par-or-better rounds to enter the final round three strokes behind Darren Clarke. Closed with a 2-over 72 in windy conditions to finish tied with fellow Americans Chad Campbell and Anthony Kim.
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]

At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.

After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
Lowry started for Leeds in the Football League Trophy Northern Area Final, second leg game against Carlisle United, in which the game was lost with Lowry missing the decisive penalty in sudden death in the penalty shootout. After the game it appeared as though Lowry was attacked by a set of Carlisle supporters who had invaded the pitch.[11] After starting every game for Leeds Lowry was dropped from the Leeds squad for the match against Brentford after suffering an injury, before returning to Villa when his loan spell ended. On 25 March 2010 Lowry re-signed for Leeds for a second loan spell, with his loan lasting until the end of the season.[12] Lowry started at left back for Leeds against Norwich City on his return to the club, a match Leeds went on to lose 1–0 in injury time.[13] Lowry didn't overley impress the Leeds fans in his loan spell at Leeds, with him being mostly played out of position at Left back for the entire spell, he was substituted for Jonathan Howson in the final game of the season against Bristol Rovers with 1–0 down at the time, but his loan spell ended on a high as Leeds were promoted in 2nd place after scoring two goals to go on and beat Bristol Rovers and secure promotion to The Championship.[14]

Shell Houston Open: After opening with an 8-under 64 for a one-stroke lead on day one, added rounds of 71-67-70 to finish T3 at the Shell Houston Open. Erased a seven-shot deficit in the third round and started the final round three shots behind 54-hole leader Sung Kang, but a final-round 70 saw him finish four strokes behind winner Russell Henley. With 27 birdies on the week (tied for most with Henley), marked his most birdies in a single event.
U.S. Open: Established the first-round lead at the U.S. Open with a 7-under 65 and was in the mix all week at Erin Hills. Followed with 73 to be one back through 36 holes. Third-round 68 had him two adrift headed into final round. Closed with even-par 72 to finish six back of Brooks Koepka at T5. In nine U.S. Open appearances, has advanced to the weekend five times and never broken par in the final round.
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
Quicken Loans National: Starting the final round of the Quicken Loans National seven shots back, the Quicken Loans ambassador recorded a career-best nine birdies to post his low round of the week, a 5-under 65 to finish T3. Marked his third top-five in his last four starts. Chances for victory took a serious hit with a double bogey (the only one of the final round) on No. 14, the easiest hole in the final round. Marked second top-three finish in six starts at the Quicken Loans National (2015-2nd).
Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship: Held off final-round charges from Thomas Pieters, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson to win the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, marking his second European Tour title. The victory was the first at the event by an American since Chris DiMarco won the inaugural event in 2006. Final-round highlights included a holed bunker shot on the eighth hole (which helped propel him to a three-stroke cushion at the turn), a chip-in for birdie on the 17th hole and then a par on the last to hold off Pieters by one stroke.

Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Categories: American male golfersOklahoma State Cowboys golfersPGA Tour golfersRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from CaliforniaGolfers from NevadaGolfers from FloridaSportspeople from Anaheim, CaliforniaPeople from Murrieta, CaliforniaSportspeople from Las VegasPeople from Jupiter, FloridaNative American sportspeopleAmerican people of Navajo descentAmerican sportspeople of Japanese descent1988 birthsLiving people
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
THE PLAYERS Championship: After beginning the final round of THE PLAYERS Championship three strokes off the lead, at 7-under 209, played his last six holes in 6-under to post a 6-under 66 and join a three-hole aggregate playoff with 2008 PLAYERS champion Sergio Garcia and Kevin Kisner. Finished birdie-par-birdie-eagle-birdie-birdie on Nos. 13-18 in regulation. Played Nos. 15-18 in a 5-under total of 11 strokes. The four-hole score of 11 set a new single-round low for the final four holes at TPC Sawgrass. Previously, seven players had finished with a score of 12 on the final four holes. When Garcia was eliminated after the aggregate playoff, Fowler and Kisner returned to the famed, par-3 17th for sudden death. Fowler converted a 4-foot, 8-inch putt for birdie to claim the title. Before his back-nine charge, his mother had made her way to the airport to leave town. A text message alerting her to her son's rally resulted in her immediate return to TPC Sawgrass in time to witness the win. With the victory, moved to ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking and No. 7 in The Presidents Cup standings.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.

In 2008, Fowler repeated as Sunnehanna Amateur champion. In the first round of the U.S. Open, Fowler shot a −1 (70) and was in a tie for 7th place. He was one of three amateurs to make the cut, along with Derek Fathauer and Michael Thompson. He ended the tournament tied for 60th. In October 2008 Fowler played on the Eisenhower Trophy team that finished second. He was the leading individual player.
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