Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
Lowry started his youth career with Australian club ECU Joondalup. He signed for Aston Villa in February 2005 along with fellow Australian Chris Herd.[3] Lowry made nine appearances for Aston Villa Reserves in the 2006–07 season, mainly coming near the end of the campaign. Lowry was also part of the squad that won the HKFC International Soccer Sevens in May 2007. In June 2007, Lowry signed a 12-month deal to his contract.

After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
While serving a suspension, Lowry signed a two-and-a-half-year permanent deal to Millwall for an undisclosed fee on 27 January 2012.[24] Lowry then made his first appearance for the club since joining Millwall permanently, playing 90 minutes, in a 2–1 loss against rivals' West Ham United on 4 February 2012.[25] Right way through March, Lowry was sidelined with ankle injury that kept him out for weeks.[26] After making his first team return against Cardiff City, in a 0–0 draw on 31 March 2012,[27] Lowry scored his first Millwall goal, which he scored the only goal in the game, in a 1–0 win over Coventry City on 17 March 2012.[28] Lowry finished his 2011–12 season, making twenty-two appearance and scoring once.
NASSAU, Bahamas — Bryson DeChambeau is the same height as Tiger Woods, but as the two stood on the Albany driving range Monday afternoon, there was no question who was larger. Woods is famous for his love of working out, but these days he’s dwarfed by DeChambeau, who has directed the full force of his obsessive nature towards the gym. This is Bryson’s Bulking Season, and it’s starting to show.
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.

On August 26, 2018, he won The Northern Trust for his first playoff victory; in the process, he established a new record for the tournament when held at the Ridgewood Country Club, with a score of 266, besting the old Ridgewood record of 270, which was set in 2014 by Hunter Mahan.[17] The following week, he won at the Dell Technologies Championship played at TPC Boston in Norton, Massachusetts, with a final score of −16, two shots clear of Justin Rose. This put him over 2000 points ahead of the second place player, Dustin Johnson, in the FedEx Cup rankings. This margin secured him top seeding at The Tour Championship, regardless of his finish at the BMW Championship. This also marked his fourth win on tour, third for the year, and second during the playoffs.[18] At the Tour Championship, DeChambeau finished 19th out of 30 participants. As a result, he fell to 3rd in the FedEx Cup, winning $2,000,000.[19]


In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
Categories: American male golfersOklahoma State Cowboys golfersPGA Tour golfersRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from CaliforniaGolfers from NevadaGolfers from FloridaSportspeople from Anaheim, CaliforniaPeople from Murrieta, CaliforniaSportspeople from Las VegasPeople from Jupiter, FloridaNative American sportspeopleAmerican people of Navajo descentAmerican sportspeople of Japanese descent1988 birthsLiving people
THE PLAYERS Championship: After beginning the final round of THE PLAYERS Championship three strokes off the lead, at 7-under 209, played his last six holes in 6-under to post a 6-under 66 and join a three-hole aggregate playoff with 2008 PLAYERS champion Sergio Garcia and Kevin Kisner. Finished birdie-par-birdie-eagle-birdie-birdie on Nos. 13-18 in regulation. Played Nos. 15-18 in a 5-under total of 11 strokes. The four-hole score of 11 set a new single-round low for the final four holes at TPC Sawgrass. Previously, seven players had finished with a score of 12 on the final four holes. When Garcia was eliminated after the aggregate playoff, Fowler and Kisner returned to the famed, par-3 17th for sudden death. Fowler converted a 4-foot, 8-inch putt for birdie to claim the title. Before his back-nine charge, his mother had made her way to the airport to leave town. A text message alerting her to her son's rally resulted in her immediate return to TPC Sawgrass in time to witness the win. With the victory, moved to ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking and No. 7 in The Presidents Cup standings.
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
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