At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

At the first FedEx Cup playoff event of the season, The Barclays, Fowler went into the final round leading the event by one stroke. He endured a difficult final round, shooting a two-over-par 74. His challenge was ended with a double-bogey at the 16th hole that put him four strokes behind playing partner Patrick Reed. He went on to finish T7, three strokes behind the winner Reed. As a result of this, Fowler also failed to secure his automatic Ryder Cup spot, which he would have done with a top-three finish. Fowler moved up from 28th to 16th in the FedEx Cup standings with this result.

THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]

Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.


DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]

On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
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