Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
In 2008, Fowler repeated as Sunnehanna Amateur champion. In the first round of the U.S. Open, Fowler shot a −1 (70) and was in a tie for 7th place. He was one of three amateurs to make the cut, along with Derek Fathauer and Michael Thompson. He ended the tournament tied for 60th. In October 2008 Fowler played on the Eisenhower Trophy team that finished second. He was the leading individual player.
Lowry started for Leeds in the Football League Trophy Northern Area Final, second leg game against Carlisle United, in which the game was lost with Lowry missing the decisive penalty in sudden death in the penalty shootout. After the game it appeared as though Lowry was attacked by a set of Carlisle supporters who had invaded the pitch.[11] After starting every game for Leeds Lowry was dropped from the Leeds squad for the match against Brentford after suffering an injury, before returning to Villa when his loan spell ended. On 25 March 2010 Lowry re-signed for Leeds for a second loan spell, with his loan lasting until the end of the season.[12] Lowry started at left back for Leeds against Norwich City on his return to the club, a match Leeds went on to lose 1–0 in injury time.[13] Lowry didn't overley impress the Leeds fans in his loan spell at Leeds, with him being mostly played out of position at Left back for the entire spell, he was substituted for Jonathan Howson in the final game of the season against Bristol Rovers with 1–0 down at the time, but his loan spell ended on a high as Leeds were promoted in 2nd place after scoring two goals to go on and beat Bristol Rovers and secure promotion to The Championship.[14]
A better look at my @cobragolf proto irons…second and third pics are top down view of 8 (40°) and 4 (24°) iron…we started working on these back in January…I wanted an old school look (thin/straight top line and no offset) while keeping the benefits of the sole and weight behind the sweet spot (tungsten plugs) these are all hand milled stainless heads…currently working on a pvd finish for the final version…stay tuned👌

the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
Shell Houston Open: After opening with an 8-under 64 for a one-stroke lead on day one, added rounds of 71-67-70 to finish T3 at the Shell Houston Open. Erased a seven-shot deficit in the third round and started the final round three shots behind 54-hole leader Sung Kang, but a final-round 70 saw him finish four strokes behind winner Russell Henley. With 27 birdies on the week (tied for most with Henley), marked his most birdies in a single event.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship: In his fourth consecutive start at the World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship, fought his way to the semifinals Sunday morning against Ernie Els. Got off to a hot start, leading for seven of the first nine holes. With a shift of momentum, Els battled back and won three consecutive holes (Nos. 10-12) to gain a 2-up lead. Following an eagle and par on Nos. 13 and 14, he squared up the match. An Els birdie-3 at No. 18 sent the match to extra holes. A birdie-3 at the 19th hole (No. 1) gave him the upset win over Els.
What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.

What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
Fowler's first PGA Tour event as a professional was the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open where he finished tied for seventh.[8] His second PGA Tour event was at the Frys.com Open played at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. He finished tied for second after losing to Troy Matteson in a three-way playoff that included Jamie Lovemark. Fowler's score of 18-under-par included a hole-in-one on the fifth hole in his final round. Fowler also notched an eagle in each of his four rounds.[9]
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]

Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]
Shell Houston Open: After opening with an 8-under 64 for a one-stroke lead on day one, added rounds of 71-67-70 to finish T3 at the Shell Houston Open. Erased a seven-shot deficit in the third round and started the final round three shots behind 54-hole leader Sung Kang, but a final-round 70 saw him finish four strokes behind winner Russell Henley. With 27 birdies on the week (tied for most with Henley), marked his most birdies in a single event.
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
×