Though he appeared in two matches as an un-used substitute for Aston Villa in the 2010–11 season, Lowry continued to be remain out of the first team and in January 2011, Lowry signed for Championship side Sheffield United until the end of the season[17] making his first start for the Blades away at Coventry City a day later.[18] Lowry made eighteen appearances for the Blades but with the club in decline he was unable to prevent them from being relegated at the end of the season.[14]


Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship: Held off final-round charges from Thomas Pieters, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson to win the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, marking his second European Tour title. The victory was the first at the event by an American since Chris DiMarco won the inaugural event in 2006. Final-round highlights included a holed bunker shot on the eighth hole (which helped propel him to a three-stroke cushion at the turn), a chip-in for birdie on the 17th hole and then a par on the last to hold off Pieters by one stroke.
World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions: Came to the 72nd hole in need of a birdie to get into a playoff with Tim Clark and Bubba Watson at the World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions. Hit a 5-wood from the fairway that came up short and went in the water on the par-5. Made par after taking a penalty and finished T3 after a final-round 70 at Sheshan International GC in Shanghai.
The form and fitness of centre-backs Michael Morrison and Jonathan Spector and left-back Jonathan Grounds restricted Lowry to a seat on the bench until mid-December. He eventually made his debut in the starting eleven for the home fixture against Cardiff City on 18 December, standing in for the injured Grounds at left back.[57] He appeared once more, in the FA Cup, before his contract was cancelled by mutual consent to enable him to return to Australia.[58]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.

U.S. Open: Established the first-round lead at the U.S. Open with a 7-under 65 and was in the mix all week at Erin Hills. Followed with 73 to be one back through 36 holes. Third-round 68 had him two adrift headed into final round. Closed with even-par 72 to finish six back of Brooks Koepka at T5. In nine U.S. Open appearances, has advanced to the weekend five times and never broken par in the final round.
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
Nationwide Tour Players Cup: Playoff runner-up to Derek Lamely at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational. Started the final round five shots behind 54-hole leader Dave Schultz. Held the lead during much of the final round but suffered a bogey at the 72nd hole of regulation to drop into a tie with Lamely and force a playoff. Lost to Lamely when he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker on the second extra hole, missing his par putt of 12 feet. Lamely rolled in a three-foot par putt to win.
5-time PGA Tour winner Bryson DeChambeau is a master of precision under pressure and one of the youngest international champions on golf’s global stage. At only 25 years old, he has already cemented his sport legacy with his innovative approach to the game. Nicknamed the “golf scientist,” DeChambeau ensures that physics are on his side. He is the only golfer on the PGA Tour with irons and wedges that measure one length, 37.5 inches, and one of the only ones who has mastered “The Science of Swing."
Enjoyed a stellar rookie season, with seven top-10 finishes and a 32nd-place finish in the FedExCup standings that led to him winning PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year honors. Finished inside the top 30 on the money list to qualify for the Masters and the U.S. Open. Played in first three Playoff events, slipping from 21st to 32nd and out of the TOUR Championship.

Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
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