On August 26, 2018, he won The Northern Trust for his first playoff victory; in the process, he established a new record for the tournament when held at the Ridgewood Country Club, with a score of 266, besting the old Ridgewood record of 270, which was set in 2014 by Hunter Mahan.[17] The following week, he won at the Dell Technologies Championship played at TPC Boston in Norton, Massachusetts, with a final score of −16, two shots clear of Justin Rose. This put him over 2000 points ahead of the second place player, Dustin Johnson, in the FedEx Cup rankings. This margin secured him top seeding at The Tour Championship, regardless of his finish at the BMW Championship. This also marked his fourth win on tour, third for the year, and second during the playoffs.[18] At the Tour Championship, DeChambeau finished 19th out of 30 participants. As a result, he fell to 3rd in the FedEx Cup, winning $2,000,000.[19]
Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).

the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
NASSAU, Bahamas — Bryson DeChambeau is the same height as Tiger Woods, but as the two stood on the Albany driving range Monday afternoon, there was no question who was larger. Woods is famous for his love of working out, but these days he’s dwarfed by DeChambeau, who has directed the full force of his obsessive nature towards the gym. This is Bryson’s Bulking Season, and it’s starting to show.
BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 36 in the FedExCup standings, with his T39 finish at Conway Farms outside Chicago leading to a final ranking of No. 38. Advanced to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola in 2012 (finished No. 28 in the FedExCup), but other three seasons led to near misses of cracking the top 30 in the FedExCup (No. 43 in 2011 and No. 32 in 2010).
PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.

In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2] 

Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.
Nationwide Tour Players Cup: Playoff runner-up to Derek Lamely at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational. Started the final round five shots behind 54-hole leader Dave Schultz. Held the lead during much of the final round but suffered a bogey at the 72nd hole of regulation to drop into a tie with Lamely and force a playoff. Lost to Lamely when he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker on the second extra hole, missing his par putt of 12 feet. Lamely rolled in a three-foot par putt to win.
In 2008, Fowler repeated as Sunnehanna Amateur champion. In the first round of the U.S. Open, Fowler shot a −1 (70) and was in a tie for 7th place. He was one of three amateurs to make the cut, along with Derek Fathauer and Michael Thompson. He ended the tournament tied for 60th. In October 2008 Fowler played on the Eisenhower Trophy team that finished second. He was the leading individual player.

Lowry won for the first time as a professional in 2012, at the Portugal Masters in October. He shot a 67 to tie for the lead with the Englishman Ross Fisher, who made bogey on the final hole after missing a four-foot putt. The victory lifted Lowry back into the Official World Golf Ranking top 100 and made him eligible to compete in the WGC-HSBC Champions.[citation needed]
Lowry won for the first time as a professional in 2012, at the Portugal Masters in October. He shot a 67 to tie for the lead with the Englishman Ross Fisher, who made bogey on the final hole after missing a four-foot putt. The victory lifted Lowry back into the Official World Golf Ranking top 100 and made him eligible to compete in the WGC-HSBC Champions.[citation needed]

Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
5-time PGA Tour winner Bryson DeChambeau is a master of precision under pressure and one of the youngest international champions on golf’s global stage. At only 25 years old, he has already cemented his sport legacy with his innovative approach to the game. Nicknamed the “golf scientist,” DeChambeau ensures that physics are on his side. He is the only golfer on the PGA Tour with irons and wedges that measure one length, 37.5 inches, and one of the only ones who has mastered “The Science of Swing."
The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 36 in the FedExCup standings, with his T39 finish at Conway Farms outside Chicago leading to a final ranking of No. 38. Advanced to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola in 2012 (finished No. 28 in the FedExCup), but other three seasons led to near misses of cracking the top 30 in the FedExCup (No. 43 in 2011 and No. 32 in 2010).
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