The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
“The switch was very easy. Even though he had won early in the year with another driver, he was not driving it good at all. He is very loyal to our team and our products that he came to us to find a new driver. He instantly loved the look of the Z 585 and once we started testing the numbers were exactly what he was looking for. His main comment about the driver is how his misses are minimal and he can hit all the shots he wants to.”
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.

What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]
Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]
Lowry made his professional debut in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League in an away fixture at Rapid Vienna.[4] On 17 September 2009, Lowry signed a three-month loan deal with Football League Championship side Plymouth Argyle.[5][6] Lowry made his Plymouth Argyle debut on 19 September 2009, playing 90 minutes, in a 3–1 loss against Newcastle United.[7] He played 13 league games for Plymouth during his loan spell, where he impressed many and was recalled by Villa who required Lowry's services as cover after some injuries to defenders.[8] 

At the PGA Championship, Fowler carded 74-69-75-68 to finish with a six-over par total of 286, in a tie for 51st place. Early on the third day Fowler rocketed up the leaderboard with three birdies in the first five holes only to falter later in the round with two triple bogeys, effectively ending his hopes of a first major championship and PGA Tour win.[20]

At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.


Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”

Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
All of DeChambeau's irons and wedges[24] are cut to exactly the same length: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm). Their lie and bounce angle are also the same; only the lofts are different. In addition to the single-length concept, his clubs are unusual for their extremely upright lie angle. [25] DeChambeau keeps the club on the same plane throughout his swing and does not turn his wrists during his swing.[26] In 2011, at the suggestion of his instructor Mike Schy, DeChambeau switched to JumboMax Grips, the largest grips commercially available. The larger grips allow DeChambeau to hold the grips in his palms and not his fingers.

PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.


Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

On 23 November 2011, Lowry was again loaned out to play in the Championship, this time to Millwall until 3 January 2012. He followed Aston Villa team-mate Nathan Baker who also signed on loan for Millwall two days earlier.[19] Lowry made his Millwall debut three days later, where he played 90 minutes, in a 0–0 draw against Crystal Palace.[20] His impressive display at Millwall soon earned a loan extension.[21] Weeks later on 13 January 2012, Lowry was sent-off in the 22nd minutes after stamping on Nikola Žigić, which saw Millwall lose 6–0.[22] Three years on after signing for Birmingham City, Lowry stated, quoting: "Whatever club I play for I fully commit to that club at the time. I play with my heart on my sleeve. Sometimes in the past I have gone overboard but I was a younger player then, I have learned a lot from these types of experiences. But I am an aggressive player, that’s the way I like to play and I can’t change the way I play. I will use my experience now and be a bit more clever."'[23]


the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.
Shane Thomas Lowry (born 12 June 1989) is an Australian footballer who plays as a defender for Al Ahli.[2] His previous clubs include Millwall, Perth Glory, Aston Villa, Plymouth Argyle, Leeds United, Sheffield United, Leyton Orient and Birmingham City. Born in Perth, Western Australia, he represented the Republic of Ireland under-17s and under-21s before choosing to pursue his senior international career with Australia.
While serving a suspension, Lowry signed a two-and-a-half-year permanent deal to Millwall for an undisclosed fee on 27 January 2012.[24] Lowry then made his first appearance for the club since joining Millwall permanently, playing 90 minutes, in a 2–1 loss against rivals' West Ham United on 4 February 2012.[25] Right way through March, Lowry was sidelined with ankle injury that kept him out for weeks.[26] After making his first team return against Cardiff City, in a 0–0 draw on 31 March 2012,[27] Lowry scored his first Millwall goal, which he scored the only goal in the game, in a 1–0 win over Coventry City on 17 March 2012.[28] Lowry finished his 2011–12 season, making twenty-two appearance and scoring once.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.
The Open Championship: Playing in the final group Sunday for the second straight time in a major championship, made a solid bid for the title, at The Open Championship, with a final-round, 5-under 67. Along with Garcia, finished second to Rory McIlroy by two strokes. With his finish at Royal Liverpool GC, became the only player of the season to claim top-five finishes in the year's first three major championships. He also became the first player to claim top-10 finishes in a season's first three majors since Woods achieved the feat in 2005. His T2 at Royal Liverpool supplanted his previous-best Open Championship finish (in four starts) of T5 in 2011. Rounds of 69-69-68-67 made him the only player in the field to post all four rounds in the 60s.
Kolon Korea Open: Won his first tournament as a professional, the Kolon Korea Open on the OneAsia Tour, when he rolled to a six-stroke win over Rory McIlroy at Woo Jeong Hills CC in early October. He took control of the tournament in the third round when he shot an 8-under 63. He followed that with a 3-under 68 Sunday. The victory was worth a little under $250,000.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.
After finishing fifth in the Hyundai Tournament of Champions in Hawaii, Fowler claimed his first victory of 2016 in the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship on the European Tour. He shot a final round of 69 to finish one clear of Belgium's Thomas Pieters.[27] Two weeks later, Fowler was in contention to win again but lost out to Japan's Hideki Matsuyama in a playoff at the Waste Management Phoenix Open.[28] On March 7, Fowler sparked fantastic scenes after sinking a hole-in-one with fellow tour pro Luke Donald's pitching wedge to win $1 million for Ernie Els' charity, Els for Autism.[29]

Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.
Lowry made his professional debut in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League in an away fixture at Rapid Vienna.[4] On 17 September 2009, Lowry signed a three-month loan deal with Football League Championship side Plymouth Argyle.[5][6] Lowry made his Plymouth Argyle debut on 19 September 2009, playing 90 minutes, in a 3–1 loss against Newcastle United.[7] He played 13 league games for Plymouth during his loan spell, where he impressed many and was recalled by Villa who required Lowry's services as cover after some injuries to defenders.[8]
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