BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.

All of DeChambeau's irons and wedges[24] are cut to exactly the same length: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm). Their lie and bounce angle are also the same; only the lofts are different. In addition to the single-length concept, his clubs are unusual for their extremely upright lie angle. [25] DeChambeau keeps the club on the same plane throughout his swing and does not turn his wrists during his swing.[26] In 2011, at the suggestion of his instructor Mike Schy, DeChambeau switched to JumboMax Grips, the largest grips commercially available. The larger grips allow DeChambeau to hold the grips in his palms and not his fingers.
After Lowry's loan spell at Leeds was coming to an end, on 11 May he signed a new two-year contract extension at Aston Villa. It was a remarkable few days for Lowry, he was promoted with Leeds, received a call up to Australia's World Cup Squad and on the same day he signed a new two-year deal with Villa.[15] Despite signing a contract with the club, Leeds United was considering re-signing him for the second time ahead of the 2010–11 season, but never happened.[16]
Deutsche Bank Championship: Shot a final-round 3-under 68 to come from one shot back and defeat third-round leader Henrik Stenson at the Deutsche Bank Championship, good for his third career PGA TOUR victory. Earned the win at age 26 years, 8 months, 25 days in his 150th career start. Collected 2,000 points and moved from No. 22 to No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Has come from behind to win all three of his PGA TOUR events, with his first two wins via playoffs (2012 Wells Fargo Championship and 2015 PLAYERS Championship). Became the sixth consecutive come-from-behind winner at TPC Boston.
2019 Open Champion Shane Lowry, compared to Tommy Fleetwood, is on the other side of the spectrum in regards to brand loyalty. He is Cleveland/Srixon in 12 clubs including the ball with the only two exceptions being the TaylorMade M4 3-wood and his Odyssey Putter. In this case, that makes sense, those clubs seem to be a challenge to swap, especially the 3-wood, and Cleveland/Srixon isn’t really known for putters on the PGA Tour.

The Open Championship: Enjoyed his best finish among seven major championship starts, with a T5 at The Open Championship at Royal St. George's. Opened with three par-or-better rounds to enter the final round three strokes behind Darren Clarke. Closed with a 2-over 72 in windy conditions to finish tied with fellow Americans Chad Campbell and Anthony Kim.
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
Masters Tournament: Finished runner-up at the Masters, one stroke behind Patrick Reed, for his best result at the event. For the first time in eight starts at Augusta National, recorded four par-or-better rounds (70-72-65-67). Earned his third runner-up in a major (2nd/2018 Masters Tournament, T2/2014 The Open Championship, T2/2014 U.S. Open) and third top-five in the last four (2nd/2018 Masters Tournament, T5/2017 Open Championship, T5/2017 U.S. Open). With third-round 65, was one of just four players to post a bogey-free round during the week (Rory McIlroy/65, Jon Rahm/65, Si Woo Kim/65) with all four occurring in the final round.
On June 16, Fowler carded a round of 65 at Erin Hills to take the first round lead at the 2017 U.S. Open. Fowler equaled the lowest first round score at the U.S. Open and led by one stroke from Paul Casey and Xander Schauffele. He followed this up with a one over par 73 in the second round to fall out of the lead by one stroke, held by four other players. He shot 68-72 over the weekend to finish in a tie for fifth place. This gave Fowler his sixth top-5 finish in a major, but he is still yet to win. Fowler started the PGA Championship with a 2-under 69 which was two strokes behind the leaders. After rounds of 70-73, he closed out the year's last major with a 4-under 67, including a run of four consecutive birdies on holes 12 through 15. Despite his solid finish, Fowler ended up tied for fifth and was 3 strokes behind the winner, and friend, Justin Thomas. It was his seventh top-5 major finish, meaning he's had multiple top-5 finishes at every major.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
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