“The switch was very easy. Even though he had won early in the year with another driver, he was not driving it good at all. He is very loyal to our team and our products that he came to us to find a new driver. He instantly loved the look of the Z 585 and once we started testing the numbers were exactly what he was looking for. His main comment about the driver is how his misses are minimal and he can hit all the shots he wants to.”
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
In the 2013–14 season, Lowry suffered a minor thigh strain in the club's pre-season friendly.[35] Despite this, Lowry remained in the first team under the new management of Steve Lomas until he received a straight red card after a foul on Will Hughes, in a 5–1 loss against Derby County on 14 September 2013.[36] After serving a three match ban, Lowry remained on the bench without playing for four matches[37] Lowry made his first team return on 2 November 2013 when he came on as a substitute for Scott Malone against Burnley. However, his return, after spending two months without playing, was a disastrous when he scored an own goal, which saw Millwall drew 2–2.[38] After this, Lowry was out of the first team, demoted to the substitute bench between mid-November and mid-December until he made his return on 26 December 2013, in a 4–0 loss against Watford.[39] On 28 January 2014, Lowry was sent-off for the second time this season in the late-minutes against Sheffield Wednesday after fighting with Giles Coke, who also was sent-off as well, with both side drew 1–1.[40] After serving a four match ban,[41] Lowry was in the first team throughout February and March until he suffered a foot injury that kept him out for the remainder of the season.[42] Lowry went on to finish the 2013–14 season, making twenty-two appearance.
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
On 28 January 2010, Lowry agreed a deal which would take him on a loan to Leeds United until 13 March 2010, joining his fellow Australian international teammates Patrick Kisnorbo and Neil Kilkenny.[9] He made his debut for Leeds against Colchester United, playing left back for Leeds.[10] After an impressive debut, Lowry suffered a minor injury and had to be substituted and replaced by Bradley Johnson after 70 minutes. After missing the FA Cup replay against Tottenham Hotspur due to not being eligible, Lowry returned to the Leeds starting lineup in the following game against Hartlepool United.
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.

On 28 January 2010, Lowry agreed a deal which would take him on a loan to Leeds United until 13 March 2010, joining his fellow Australian international teammates Patrick Kisnorbo and Neil Kilkenny.[9] He made his debut for Leeds against Colchester United, playing left back for Leeds.[10] After an impressive debut, Lowry suffered a minor injury and had to be substituted and replaced by Bradley Johnson after 70 minutes. After missing the FA Cup replay against Tottenham Hotspur due to not being eligible, Lowry returned to the Leeds starting lineup in the following game against Hartlepool United.

Deutsche Bank Championship: Shot a final-round 3-under 68 to come from one shot back and defeat third-round leader Henrik Stenson at the Deutsche Bank Championship, good for his third career PGA TOUR victory. Earned the win at age 26 years, 8 months, 25 days in his 150th career start. Collected 2,000 points and moved from No. 22 to No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Has come from behind to win all three of his PGA TOUR events, with his first two wins via playoffs (2012 Wells Fargo Championship and 2015 PLAYERS Championship). Became the sixth consecutive come-from-behind winner at TPC Boston.


At the PGA Championship, Fowler carded 74-69-75-68 to finish with a six-over par total of 286, in a tie for 51st place. Early on the third day Fowler rocketed up the leaderboard with three birdies in the first five holes only to falter later in the round with two triple bogeys, effectively ending his hopes of a first major championship and PGA Tour win.[20]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
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