Lowry missed the first three cuts of his professional career, but had his first payday on 5 July, when he finished 50th at the Open de France ALSTOM.[13] He had his best professional result in November 2009, when he finished 3rd in the Dunlop Phoenix Tournament in Japan.[14] In January 2010, Lowry finished in fourth place in the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship,[15] moving him into the top-100 of the Official World Golf Ranking.[16]
U.S. Open: Playing alongside eventual-champion Martin Kaymer in the final pairing Sunday, followed up his career-best round (3-under 67) in a U.S. Open with a final-round, 2-over 72 to remain T2 (the sixth runner-up finish of his career). It was his best performance in six U.S. Open starts (previous-best finish was a T10 in 2013). It was also his top major championship showing among his 18 starts (previous-best finishes were T5s at the 2011 Open Championship and the 2014 Masters). His pairing with the 29-year-old Kaymer was just the third final grouping at the U.S. Open since 1965 with two players in their 20s. The others were John Mahaffey (28) and Jerry Pate (22) in 1976 and Woods (26) and Sergio Garcia (22) in 2002.

Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]


Nationwide Tour Players Cup: Playoff runner-up to Derek Lamely at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational. Started the final round five shots behind 54-hole leader Dave Schultz. Held the lead during much of the final round but suffered a bogey at the 72nd hole of regulation to drop into a tie with Lamely and force a playoff. Lost to Lamely when he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker on the second extra hole, missing his par putt of 12 feet. Lamely rolled in a three-foot par putt to win.

BMW Championship: After entering the final round of the BMW Championship in a second-place tie with Jason Day (five strokes behind Marc Leishman), recorded a 4-under 67 to finish T2, his 11th career runner-up on the PGA TOUR. Week was highlighted by a career-best, six consecutive birdies in the first round on Nos. 12-17. Chipped in from 64 feet on the 17th.


Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Categories: American male golfersOklahoma State Cowboys golfersPGA Tour golfersRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from CaliforniaGolfers from NevadaGolfers from FloridaSportspeople from Anaheim, CaliforniaPeople from Murrieta, CaliforniaSportspeople from Las VegasPeople from Jupiter, FloridaNative American sportspeopleAmerican people of Navajo descentAmerican sportspeople of Japanese descent1988 birthsLiving people
DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.

In May 2012, Fowler won the Wells Fargo Championship in Charlotte on the first extra hole of a sudden-death playoff. Replaying the 18th hole, he defeated Rory McIlroy and D. A. Points with a birdie to gain his first PGA Tour win. Fowler shot a 69 (−3) in the final round to finish in a three-way tie after 72 holes at Quail Hollow Club. This win enabled Fowler to break the top-25 in the world, placing him at number 24. The following week at The Players Championship in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Fowler played the final hole at −11 under par and had a birdie opportunity to bring him within one of leader and eventual winner Matt Kuchar. Fowler, however, pushed his putt to the right and finished in a tie for second, the fifth second-place finish of his career.

Nationwide Tour Players Cup: Playoff runner-up to Derek Lamely at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational. Started the final round five shots behind 54-hole leader Dave Schultz. Held the lead during much of the final round but suffered a bogey at the 72nd hole of regulation to drop into a tie with Lamely and force a playoff. Lost to Lamely when he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker on the second extra hole, missing his par putt of 12 feet. Lamely rolled in a three-foot par putt to win.


U.S. Open: Established the first-round lead at the U.S. Open with a 7-under 65 and was in the mix all week at Erin Hills. Followed with 73 to be one back through 36 holes. Third-round 68 had him two adrift headed into final round. Closed with even-par 72 to finish six back of Brooks Koepka at T5. In nine U.S. Open appearances, has advanced to the weekend five times and never broken par in the final round.
NASSAU, Bahamas — Bryson DeChambeau is the same height as Tiger Woods, but as the two stood on the Albany driving range Monday afternoon, there was no question who was larger. Woods is famous for his love of working out, but these days he’s dwarfed by DeChambeau, who has directed the full force of his obsessive nature towards the gym. This is Bryson’s Bulking Season, and it’s starting to show.
PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.
Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship: Held off final-round charges from Thomas Pieters, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson to win the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, marking his second European Tour title. The victory was the first at the event by an American since Chris DiMarco won the inaugural event in 2006. Final-round highlights included a holed bunker shot on the eighth hole (which helped propel him to a three-stroke cushion at the turn), a chip-in for birdie on the 17th hole and then a par on the last to hold off Pieters by one stroke.
NASSAU, Bahamas — Bryson DeChambeau is the same height as Tiger Woods, but as the two stood on the Albany driving range Monday afternoon, there was no question who was larger. Woods is famous for his love of working out, but these days he’s dwarfed by DeChambeau, who has directed the full force of his obsessive nature towards the gym. This is Bryson’s Bulking Season, and it’s starting to show.
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
Hero World Challenge: After beginning the final round seven strokes out of the lead, closed with a tournament-record, personal-best 11-under 61 to win the Hero World Challenge by four strokes over Charley Hoffman. With a winning score of 18-under 270, won at the age of 28 years, 11 months and 20 days. His 61 topped the previous Hero World Challenge course record of 62, set by Albany resident Justin Rose during the final round in 2015. Prior to his 61, the previous low final-round score by a Hero World Challenge winner was 64, set on three occasions and most recently by Luke Donald in 2005. Opened his final round with seven birdies before making his first par on the par-4 eighth hole. No player has had as long a streak of birdies in an official PGA TOUR event to open a round since Joe Durant started round four of the 2005 Honda Classic with seven in a row. Added a birdie on the ninth hole to make the turn with an 8-under 28, turning a seven-stroke deficit into a two-stroke lead. His final round included 11 birdies, two more than his benchmark of nine birdies in official PGA TOUR events (final round of the Quicken Loans National in 2017). Finished the week at Albany Golf Club with 30 birdies, three more than his highest total in official PGA TOUR events (27 – 2017 Houston Open). Recorded his sixth top-six finish at the event in his sixth start (1/2017, T3/2016, 3/2015, T6/2014, T4/2012, T6/2011).

Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
Hero World Challenge: After beginning the final round seven strokes out of the lead, closed with a tournament-record, personal-best 11-under 61 to win the Hero World Challenge by four strokes over Charley Hoffman. With a winning score of 18-under 270, won at the age of 28 years, 11 months and 20 days. His 61 topped the previous Hero World Challenge course record of 62, set by Albany resident Justin Rose during the final round in 2015. Prior to his 61, the previous low final-round score by a Hero World Challenge winner was 64, set on three occasions and most recently by Luke Donald in 2005. Opened his final round with seven birdies before making his first par on the par-4 eighth hole. No player has had as long a streak of birdies in an official PGA TOUR event to open a round since Joe Durant started round four of the 2005 Honda Classic with seven in a row. Added a birdie on the ninth hole to make the turn with an 8-under 28, turning a seven-stroke deficit into a two-stroke lead. His final round included 11 birdies, two more than his benchmark of nine birdies in official PGA TOUR events (final round of the Quicken Loans National in 2017). Finished the week at Albany Golf Club with 30 birdies, three more than his highest total in official PGA TOUR events (27 – 2017 Houston Open). Recorded his sixth top-six finish at the event in his sixth start (1/2017, T3/2016, 3/2015, T6/2014, T4/2012, T6/2011).

Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
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