What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.
On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
On 23 November 2011, Lowry was again loaned out to play in the Championship, this time to Millwall until 3 January 2012. He followed Aston Villa team-mate Nathan Baker who also signed on loan for Millwall two days earlier.[19] Lowry made his Millwall debut three days later, where he played 90 minutes, in a 0–0 draw against Crystal Palace.[20] His impressive display at Millwall soon earned a loan extension.[21] Weeks later on 13 January 2012, Lowry was sent-off in the 22nd minutes after stamping on Nikola Žigić, which saw Millwall lose 6–0.[22] Three years on after signing for Birmingham City, Lowry stated, quoting: "Whatever club I play for I fully commit to that club at the time. I play with my heart on my sleeve. Sometimes in the past I have gone overboard but I was a younger player then, I have learned a lot from these types of experiences. But I am an aggressive player, that’s the way I like to play and I can’t change the way I play. I will use my experience now and be a bit more clever."'[23]
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.
After Lowry's loan spell at Leeds was coming to an end, on 11 May he signed a new two-year contract extension at Aston Villa. It was a remarkable few days for Lowry, he was promoted with Leeds, received a call up to Australia's World Cup Squad and on the same day he signed a new two-year deal with Villa.[15] Despite signing a contract with the club, Leeds United was considering re-signing him for the second time ahead of the 2010–11 season, but never happened.[16]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]
Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open: Earned his second international victory when he captured the Aberdeen Asset management Scottish Open in come-from-behind fashion at Gullane GC in July. After a bogey on the 14th hole Sunday, fell two shots off the lead. He responded with three birdies over his final four holes to catch and pass American Matt Kuchar, who shot a final-round 68 to post the clubhouse lead at 11-under. He made a 9-foot birdie putt at No. 15, made a two-putt birdie at the par-5 16th, parred the 17th then hit his approach shot on the par-4 finishing hole to 2 feet for the tap-in birdie and the title. Joined seven other players who made the Scottish Open their first European Tour win.
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event of the season, The Barclays, Fowler went into the final round leading the event by one stroke. He endured a difficult final round, shooting a two-over-par 74. His challenge was ended with a double-bogey at the 16th hole that put him four strokes behind playing partner Patrick Reed. He went on to finish T7, three strokes behind the winner Reed. As a result of this, Fowler also failed to secure his automatic Ryder Cup spot, which he would have done with a top-three finish. Fowler moved up from 28th to 16th in the FedEx Cup standings with this result.

Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.


Fowler's first PGA Tour event as a professional was the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open where he finished tied for seventh.[8] His second PGA Tour event was at the Frys.com Open played at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. He finished tied for second after losing to Troy Matteson in a three-way playoff that included Jamie Lovemark. Fowler's score of 18-under-par included a hole-in-one on the fifth hole in his final round. Fowler also notched an eagle in each of his four rounds.[9]
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
The form and fitness of centre-backs Michael Morrison and Jonathan Spector and left-back Jonathan Grounds restricted Lowry to a seat on the bench until mid-December. He eventually made his debut in the starting eleven for the home fixture against Cardiff City on 18 December, standing in for the injured Grounds at left back.[57] He appeared once more, in the FA Cup, before his contract was cancelled by mutual consent to enable him to return to Australia.[58]
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
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