Shane Thomas Lowry (born 12 June 1989) is an Australian footballer who plays as a defender for Al Ahli.[2] His previous clubs include Millwall, Perth Glory, Aston Villa, Plymouth Argyle, Leeds United, Sheffield United, Leyton Orient and Birmingham City. Born in Perth, Western Australia, he represented the Republic of Ireland under-17s and under-21s before choosing to pursue his senior international career with Australia.
Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship: Held off final-round charges from Thomas Pieters, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson to win the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, marking his second European Tour title. The victory was the first at the event by an American since Chris DiMarco won the inaugural event in 2006. Final-round highlights included a holed bunker shot on the eighth hole (which helped propel him to a three-stroke cushion at the turn), a chip-in for birdie on the 17th hole and then a par on the last to hold off Pieters by one stroke.
Fowler's first PGA Tour event as a professional was the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open where he finished tied for seventh.[8] His second PGA Tour event was at the Frys.com Open played at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. He finished tied for second after losing to Troy Matteson in a three-way playoff that included Jamie Lovemark. Fowler's score of 18-under-par included a hole-in-one on the fifth hole in his final round. Fowler also notched an eagle in each of his four rounds.[9]
As for the workouts he’s doing, DeChambeau is continuing work he’s done with Greg Roskopf, whose system focuses on making people stronger where they are weak, particularly at extraneous points in their muscular system. In other words, there are likely points in the golf swing — in various golf movements — where DeChambeau isn’t as strong as he could be, hence the more work and weight. If he has already ascended to 220 in a matter of weeks, 230 should follow soon. Stay tuned.
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
Wells Fargo Championship: Made birdie-3 on the first extra hole (No. 18) to defeat Rory McIlroy and D.A. Points at the Wells Fargo Championship for his first TOUR win. Improved to 1-1 in playoffs (lost to Troy Matteson, 2009 Frys.com Open). The playoff was the fifth at the Wells Fargo Championship. At the age of 23 years, 4 months, 23 days, became the third player to make the Wells Fargo Championship his first PGA TOUR win (Anthony Kim in 2008 and McIlroy in 2010). Became the third-youngest winner of the event, behind McIlroy (20 years, 11 months, 28 days) and Kim (22, 10, 15). His win came in his 72nd start on TOUR and was his 16th top-10 finish. Opening-round 66 is the lowest start by a winner of the Wells Fargo Championship. Won in his third start at the Wells Fargo Championship (T6 in 2010 and T16 in 2011).
PGA Championship: With his T5 finish at the PGA Championship, finishing three strokes behind champion Justin Thomas, continued to be a top-five machine in major championships, recording his seventh such finish in 32 starts. Made a furious Sunday rally, with six birdies, including four in a row on Nos 12-15, but pars on The Green Mile (Nos. 16-18) left him a few short of his friend, Justin Thomas.
At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.
What this looks like to the naked eye is a DeChambeau who is visibly larger than he was two months ago, when he first teased the idea of a bigger, stronger self. He was under 200 pounds then — now he’s 222. “I’m going to become like a gymnast. I watch online, on Instagram, these gymnast influencers, and that’s where I want to get.” It’s a step in the right direction, but 222 is not nearly big enough. DeChambeau has a Hulk-like vision for his future.

Kolon Korea Open: Won his first tournament as a professional, the Kolon Korea Open on the OneAsia Tour, when he rolled to a six-stroke win over Rory McIlroy at Woo Jeong Hills CC in early October. He took control of the tournament in the third round when he shot an 8-under 63. He followed that with a 3-under 68 Sunday. The victory was worth a little under $250,000.
On 28 January 2010, Lowry agreed a deal which would take him on a loan to Leeds United until 13 March 2010, joining his fellow Australian international teammates Patrick Kisnorbo and Neil Kilkenny.[9] He made his debut for Leeds against Colchester United, playing left back for Leeds.[10] After an impressive debut, Lowry suffered a minor injury and had to be substituted and replaced by Bradley Johnson after 70 minutes. After missing the FA Cup replay against Tottenham Hotspur due to not being eligible, Lowry returned to the Leeds starting lineup in the following game against Hartlepool United.
On August 26, 2018, he won The Northern Trust for his first playoff victory; in the process, he established a new record for the tournament when held at the Ridgewood Country Club, with a score of 266, besting the old Ridgewood record of 270, which was set in 2014 by Hunter Mahan.[17] The following week, he won at the Dell Technologies Championship played at TPC Boston in Norton, Massachusetts, with a final score of −16, two shots clear of Justin Rose. This put him over 2000 points ahead of the second place player, Dustin Johnson, in the FedEx Cup rankings. This margin secured him top seeding at The Tour Championship, regardless of his finish at the BMW Championship. This also marked his fourth win on tour, third for the year, and second during the playoffs.[18] At the Tour Championship, DeChambeau finished 19th out of 30 participants. As a result, he fell to 3rd in the FedEx Cup, winning $2,000,000.[19]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
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