Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.

Deutsche Bank Championship: Shot a final-round 3-under 68 to come from one shot back and defeat third-round leader Henrik Stenson at the Deutsche Bank Championship, good for his third career PGA TOUR victory. Earned the win at age 26 years, 8 months, 25 days in his 150th career start. Collected 2,000 points and moved from No. 22 to No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Has come from behind to win all three of his PGA TOUR events, with his first two wins via playoffs (2012 Wells Fargo Championship and 2015 PLAYERS Championship). Became the sixth consecutive come-from-behind winner at TPC Boston.

DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]
PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.
On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
Lowry did not win on the European Tour from 2016 to 2018 but was joint runner-up in the 2017 DP World Tour Championship, Dubai and runner-up in the 2018 Andalucía Valderrama Masters. In January 2019 he won the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship by a stroke from Richard Sterne. Lowry led by 3 strokes after three rounds but was two-over-par after 11 holes of his final round and dropped 4 shots behind Sterne. However he finished with 3 birdies in the final 7 holes, while Sterne had two bogeys, giving Lowry the victory.[20]
In the 2012–13 season, Lowry regained his first team place, playing in the left-back and central defense positions until he missed one game after picking up a yellow card for the fifth time against Bristol City on 2 October 2012.[29] After making his first team return as a left-back, Lowry then provided assist for the winning goal when he set up a goal for Chris Woods, in a 1–0 win against his former club, Leeds United on 18 November 2012.[30] Lowry was then banned for two matches between 19 January 2013 and 25 January 2013 after picking up a yellow card for the tenth time this season.[31] Lowry then He "curled a superb, dipping free-kick" to score from 35 yards (32 m) as Millwall beat Charlton Athletic 2–0 at The Valley on 16 March 2013.[32] Lowry played in all matches in the run up to the Lions' FA Cup semi final against Wigan Athletic at Wembley, though he missed one match in the 4th round against his former club, Aston Villa.[33] In late-April, Lowry was given a three match ban after being booked for the fifteenth time this season.[34] Despite this, Lowry finished the 2012–13 season, making forty-five appearance and scoring once in all competitions.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
PGA Championship: With his T5 finish at the PGA Championship, finishing three strokes behind champion Justin Thomas, continued to be a top-five machine in major championships, recording his seventh such finish in 32 starts. Made a furious Sunday rally, with six birdies, including four in a row on Nos 12-15, but pars on The Green Mile (Nos. 16-18) left him a few short of his friend, Justin Thomas.
Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]

Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
Frys.com Open: At the Frys.com Open in Scottsdale, Ariz., reached a three-way playoff with Jamie Lovemark and eventual-winner Troy Matteson. Began the final round four strokes behind Matteson, but played his first five holes in 5-under, punctuated by a hole-in-one from 211 yards at the par-3 fifth hole. After finishing T2 in the playoff, he had recorded all eight of his professional rounds in the 60s. Thanks to the T7 in Las Vegas at the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open and T2 finish at Grayhawk GC, he surpassed No. 150 from the 2008 money list, earning special temporary membership on TOUR for the remainder of the season.

Lowry won for the first time as a professional in 2012, at the Portugal Masters in October. He shot a 67 to tie for the lead with the Englishman Ross Fisher, who made bogey on the final hole after missing a four-foot putt. The victory lifted Lowry back into the Official World Golf Ranking top 100 and made him eligible to compete in the WGC-HSBC Champions.[citation needed]
Enjoyed a stellar rookie season, with seven top-10 finishes and a 32nd-place finish in the FedExCup standings that led to him winning PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year honors. Finished inside the top 30 on the money list to qualify for the Masters and the U.S. Open. Played in first three Playoff events, slipping from 21st to 32nd and out of the TOUR Championship.
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
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