In the 2013–14 season, Lowry suffered a minor thigh strain in the club's pre-season friendly.[35] Despite this, Lowry remained in the first team under the new management of Steve Lomas until he received a straight red card after a foul on Will Hughes, in a 5–1 loss against Derby County on 14 September 2013.[36] After serving a three match ban, Lowry remained on the bench without playing for four matches[37] Lowry made his first team return on 2 November 2013 when he came on as a substitute for Scott Malone against Burnley. However, his return, after spending two months without playing, was a disastrous when he scored an own goal, which saw Millwall drew 2–2.[38] After this, Lowry was out of the first team, demoted to the substitute bench between mid-November and mid-December until he made his return on 26 December 2013, in a 4–0 loss against Watford.[39] On 28 January 2014, Lowry was sent-off for the second time this season in the late-minutes against Sheffield Wednesday after fighting with Giles Coke, who also was sent-off as well, with both side drew 1–1.[40] After serving a four match ban,[41] Lowry was in the first team throughout February and March until he suffered a foot injury that kept him out for the remainder of the season.[42] Lowry went on to finish the 2013–14 season, making twenty-two appearance.
After finishing fifth in the Hyundai Tournament of Champions in Hawaii, Fowler claimed his first victory of 2016 in the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship on the European Tour. He shot a final round of 69 to finish one clear of Belgium's Thomas Pieters.[27] Two weeks later, Fowler was in contention to win again but lost out to Japan's Hideki Matsuyama in a playoff at the Waste Management Phoenix Open.[28] On March 7, Fowler sparked fantastic scenes after sinking a hole-in-one with fellow tour pro Luke Donald's pitching wedge to win $1 million for Ernie Els' charity, Els for Autism.[29]

Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).


The Open Championship: Enjoyed his best finish among seven major championship starts, with a T5 at The Open Championship at Royal St. George's. Opened with three par-or-better rounds to enter the final round three strokes behind Darren Clarke. Closed with a 2-over 72 in windy conditions to finish tied with fellow Americans Chad Campbell and Anthony Kim.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Nationwide Tour Players Cup: Playoff runner-up to Derek Lamely at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational. Started the final round five shots behind 54-hole leader Dave Schultz. Held the lead during much of the final round but suffered a bogey at the 72nd hole of regulation to drop into a tie with Lamely and force a playoff. Lost to Lamely when he failed to get up and down from a greenside bunker on the second extra hole, missing his par putt of 12 feet. Lamely rolled in a three-foot par putt to win.

With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
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