At the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club near Pittsburgh, Lowry shot 65 (−5) in the third round for 203 (−7) and a four-stroke advantage over Dustin Johnson and Andrew Landry at the 54-hole stage. The 65 was Lowry's joint career best round at a major championship. Due to weather delays on Thursday, the third round was not completed until early on Sunday, and Lowry birdied two of his remaining four holes to extend his two stroke overnight lead to four. In the final round he was in contention for the title, within one shot of Dustin Johnson after 12 holes, before three consecutive bogeys on holes 14, 15 and 16 ended his chances. He finished the tournament tied for second place, with a final round score of 76.

The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.


The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

Enjoyed a stellar rookie season, with seven top-10 finishes and a 32nd-place finish in the FedExCup standings that led to him winning PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year honors. Finished inside the top 30 on the money list to qualify for the Masters and the U.S. Open. Played in first three Playoff events, slipping from 21st to 32nd and out of the TOUR Championship.

In February 2010, Fowler finished second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open with a score of 15-under-par at the TPC of Scottsdale course. In June, Fowler notched his third PGA Tour runner-up finish at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Fowler entered the final round in the lead, but shot a 73 to finish behind Justin Rose, who recorded his first PGA Tour victory. This performance took Fowler into the top 50 of the Official World Golf Ranking.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
In September, he signed a clothing deal with Puma.[11] In the same month, he was also chosen as a captain's pick for the U.S. Ryder Cup team.[12] At age 21 years and 9 months when the matches began, Fowler became the youngest U.S. Ryder Cup player of all time, and only European Sergio García was younger when he made his Ryder Cup debut in 1999. Fowler forfeited a hole during foursomes competition on the first match day because of a rules violation, by taking a permissible free drop from muddy conditions in an improper location, a mistake U.S. captain Corey Pavin attributed to Fowler's inexperience.[13] On the final day of the competition in his singles match against Edoardo Molinari, Fowler birdied the last 4 holes to halve the match after having been 4 down after 12 holes.[14]
5-time PGA Tour winner Bryson DeChambeau is a master of precision under pressure and one of the youngest international champions on golf’s global stage. At only 25 years old, he has already cemented his sport legacy with his innovative approach to the game. Nicknamed the “golf scientist,” DeChambeau ensures that physics are on his side. He is the only golfer on the PGA Tour with irons and wedges that measure one length, 37.5 inches, and one of the only ones who has mastered “The Science of Swing."
OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Birdied two of his last three holes at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba to fire a final-round 67 and finish in 2nd place, one shot back of Patton Kizzire. In his first start at the event, opened with a bogey-free, 6-under 65 to sit three back of Kizzire's lead. Followed with three-consecutives rounds of 67 in rounds two through four, resulting in a score of 18-under 266. Due to inclement weather Saturday, played his final two rounds on Sunday.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.
Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
In the 2012–13 season, Lowry regained his first team place, playing in the left-back and central defense positions until he missed one game after picking up a yellow card for the fifth time against Bristol City on 2 October 2012.[29] After making his first team return as a left-back, Lowry then provided assist for the winning goal when he set up a goal for Chris Woods, in a 1–0 win against his former club, Leeds United on 18 November 2012.[30] Lowry was then banned for two matches between 19 January 2013 and 25 January 2013 after picking up a yellow card for the tenth time this season.[31] Lowry then He "curled a superb, dipping free-kick" to score from 35 yards (32 m) as Millwall beat Charlton Athletic 2–0 at The Valley on 16 March 2013.[32] Lowry played in all matches in the run up to the Lions' FA Cup semi final against Wigan Athletic at Wembley, though he missed one match in the 4th round against his former club, Aston Villa.[33] In late-April, Lowry was given a three match ban after being booked for the fifteenth time this season.[34] Despite this, Lowry finished the 2012–13 season, making forty-five appearance and scoring once in all competitions.
Presidents Cup: Closed out his second consecutive Presidents Cup appearance with a 6-and-4 victory over Emiliano Grillo, helping lead the United States to a 19-11 win over the International Team. Compiled a 3-0-1 overall record, highlighted by victories the first two days with teammate Justin Thomas in Foursomes (6 and 4 over Charl Schwartzel and Hideki Matsuyama) and Four-ball (3 and 2 over Branden Grace and Louis Oosthuizen).
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]
Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71]

Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]
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