Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
The Barclays: Held a one-stroke lead over Patrick Reed after 54 holes at The Barclays in the FedExCup Playoffs, before a double bogey-birdie-bogey finish on Nos. 16-18 resulted in a T7 at 6-under 278 with Jason Kokrak and Ryan Moore. Fowler went bogey free at Bethpage Black from the 10th hole in round one until the 11th hole in the final round, a span of 55 holes. His 55-consecutive holes without a bogey became a personal best on the PGA TOUR, besting 53 from the 2010 Memorial Tournament. This streak also marked the longest recorded in Barclays history since hole information began in 1983. Ian Poulter had the longest with 45 in 2010. The finish marked his third top-10 showing in his last four starts in the event (T9/2013, T9/2014).
Fowler's first PGA Tour event as a professional was the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open where he finished tied for seventh.[8] His second PGA Tour event was at the Frys.com Open played at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. He finished tied for second after losing to Troy Matteson in a three-way playoff that included Jamie Lovemark. Fowler's score of 18-under-par included a hole-in-one on the fifth hole in his final round. Fowler also notched an eagle in each of his four rounds.[9]
At the first FedEx Cup playoff event of the season, The Barclays, Fowler went into the final round leading the event by one stroke. He endured a difficult final round, shooting a two-over-par 74. His challenge was ended with a double-bogey at the 16th hole that put him four strokes behind playing partner Patrick Reed. He went on to finish T7, three strokes behind the winner Reed. As a result of this, Fowler also failed to secure his automatic Ryder Cup spot, which he would have done with a top-three finish. Fowler moved up from 28th to 16th in the FedEx Cup standings with this result.

Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open: Earned his second international victory when he captured the Aberdeen Asset management Scottish Open in come-from-behind fashion at Gullane GC in July. After a bogey on the 14th hole Sunday, fell two shots off the lead. He responded with three birdies over his final four holes to catch and pass American Matt Kuchar, who shot a final-round 68 to post the clubhouse lead at 11-under. He made a 9-foot birdie putt at No. 15, made a two-putt birdie at the par-5 16th, parred the 17th then hit his approach shot on the par-4 finishing hole to 2 feet for the tap-in birdie and the title. Joined seven other players who made the Scottish Open their first European Tour win.


In the 2013–14 season, Lowry suffered a minor thigh strain in the club's pre-season friendly.[35] Despite this, Lowry remained in the first team under the new management of Steve Lomas until he received a straight red card after a foul on Will Hughes, in a 5–1 loss against Derby County on 14 September 2013.[36] After serving a three match ban, Lowry remained on the bench without playing for four matches[37] Lowry made his first team return on 2 November 2013 when he came on as a substitute for Scott Malone against Burnley. However, his return, after spending two months without playing, was a disastrous when he scored an own goal, which saw Millwall drew 2–2.[38] After this, Lowry was out of the first team, demoted to the substitute bench between mid-November and mid-December until he made his return on 26 December 2013, in a 4–0 loss against Watford.[39] On 28 January 2014, Lowry was sent-off for the second time this season in the late-minutes against Sheffield Wednesday after fighting with Giles Coke, who also was sent-off as well, with both side drew 1–1.[40] After serving a four match ban,[41] Lowry was in the first team throughout February and March until he suffered a foot injury that kept him out for the remainder of the season.[42] Lowry went on to finish the 2013–14 season, making twenty-two appearance.
Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]

Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
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