Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
PGA Championship: Finished T3 and two strokes behind McIlroy at the PGA Championship in his 20th major championship start, with T19 in 2013 the previous-best finish in four prior PGA Championship starts. Became the first to claim top-five finishes in all four majors since Woods in 2005. Since 1934, is just the third player to perform the feat, joining Woods in 2000 and 2005 and Jack Nicklaus in 1971 and 1973. Played all four majors in 32-under, with McIlroy second on the list, at 27-under.

Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7] 

Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”

DeChambeau made his PGA Tour debut as an amateur in June 2015 at the FedEx St. Jude Classic near Memphis, Tennessee, and finished in 45th place. He played in his first major championship at the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, but missed the cut by four strokes.[4] DeChambeau was unable to defend his NCAA title in 2016 after the SMU athletic department was handed a postseason ban by the NCAA.[5] He decided to forgo his senior season to play in a number of events before turning professional.[6] At the 2015 Australian Masters in November, DeChambeau was runner-up with John Senden and Andrew Evans, two shots behind the winner Peter Senior.[7] He was the low amateur at the Masters in 2016 and tied for 21st place.[8]

All of DeChambeau's irons and wedges[24] are cut to exactly the same length: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm). Their lie and bounce angle are also the same; only the lofts are different. In addition to the single-length concept, his clubs are unusual for their extremely upright lie angle. [25] DeChambeau keeps the club on the same plane throughout his swing and does not turn his wrists during his swing.[26] In 2011, at the suggestion of his instructor Mike Schy, DeChambeau switched to JumboMax Grips, the largest grips commercially available. The larger grips allow DeChambeau to hold the grips in his palms and not his fingers.


Lowry received his first call-up to the full Australia squad for a friendly against the Netherlands in Sydney and the Asian Cup qualifier against Oman in Melbourne in October.[65] He did not play in either match.[66][67] On 11 May 2010 he was selected as part of Pim Verbeek's 30-man provisional squad for the 2010 World Cup,[68] and travelled to South Africa, but was not included in the final 23-man World Cup squad.[69] Lowry was named in Han Berger's 18-man squad for an August 2010 friendly against Slovenia, but he did not appear in the match.[70][71] 

In May 2012, Fowler won the Wells Fargo Championship in Charlotte on the first extra hole of a sudden-death playoff. Replaying the 18th hole, he defeated Rory McIlroy and D. A. Points with a birdie to gain his first PGA Tour win. Fowler shot a 69 (−3) in the final round to finish in a three-way tie after 72 holes at Quail Hollow Club. This win enabled Fowler to break the top-25 in the world, placing him at number 24. The following week at The Players Championship in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Fowler played the final hole at −11 under par and had a birdie opportunity to bring him within one of leader and eventual winner Matt Kuchar. Fowler, however, pushed his putt to the right and finished in a tie for second, the fifth second-place finish of his career.
Fowler is one of four golfers in the "Golf Boys" group along with fellow PGA Tour players Ben Crane, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan. The Golf Boys released a YouTube video of the song "Oh Oh Oh" on the eve of the 2011 U.S. Open. Farmers Insurance is donating $1,000 for every 100,000 views of the video. The charitable proceeds will support both Farmers and Ben Crane charitable initiatives.[43]
As for the workouts he’s doing, DeChambeau is continuing work he’s done with Greg Roskopf, whose system focuses on making people stronger where they are weak, particularly at extraneous points in their muscular system. In other words, there are likely points in the golf swing — in various golf movements — where DeChambeau isn’t as strong as he could be, hence the more work and weight. If he has already ascended to 220 in a matter of weeks, 230 should follow soon. Stay tuned.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Won fifth PGA TOUR title at the Waste Management Phoenix Open in his 220th career start at the age of 30 years, 1 month, 21 days. Began the final round with a four-shot lead and won by two strokes after recording a double bogey and triple bogey en route to a closing 3-over 74. Became the first player since 1983 to win with both a double bogey and triple bogey or worse in the final round. Triple bogey came at No. 11 at TPC Scottsdale after he chipped his ball into the water and received an additional penalty when the ball rolled back into the water after he had placed it back into play. Marked the second time of seven occasions he converted a 54-hole lead to victory.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Claimed his second runner-up finish at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, one shot behind Hunter Mahan. Had birdie opportunities on the last three holes but unable to catch Mahan. Previously lost in a playoff to Troy Matteson just down the road at Grayhawk GC in the 2009 Frys.com Open. Had he won at TPC Scottsdale, would have become the first Sponsor Exemption to do so since Jason Gore (2005 84 Lumber Classic). Lee Westwood later won in June as a Sponsor Exemption at the St. Jude Classic presented by Smith & Nephew.
The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
Lowry was the 2007 Irish Amateur Close Champion, defeating Niall Turner 4 & 3 in the final.[5] While still an amateur in May 2009, he won The Irish Open on the European Tour, defeating Robert Rock on the third hole of a sudden death playoff. The win, on his tour début, made him just the third amateur to win on the European Tour,[6] following Danny Lee earlier in the 2009 season, and Pablo Martín in 2007. Lowry shot a 62 to equal the lowest ever by an amateur on the circuit and led from the second round onwards.[7]
Lowry started the 2018-19 season with partial status after finishing 140th in the FedEx Cup. He moved into a share of the 36-hole lead at the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, after successive opening rounds of 67. He was tied at eight under with J. B. Holmes. Lowry then shot a 63 for a new course record to lead by four strokes at the end of the third round.[21] He won the tournament by six shots ahead of Tommy Fleetwood.[22][23][24]
“I was literally thinking I’d need surgery but I talked to Greg, he was like no, no, no, don’t do any of that, we’re going to teach your body to tolerate the force. Usually when ligaments get torn or bones get broken or whatever it’s because the muscles aren’t functioning properly, so thats what I’ve been doing.” He’s been focusing on exercises that get him into “extreme positions of rotations and flexions” at which point he adds weight to build mental and physical tolerance in those positions.
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
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