With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
U.S. Open: Established the first-round lead at the U.S. Open with a 7-under 65 and was in the mix all week at Erin Hills. Followed with 73 to be one back through 36 holes. Third-round 68 had him two adrift headed into final round. Closed with even-par 72 to finish six back of Brooks Koepka at T5. In nine U.S. Open appearances, has advanced to the weekend five times and never broken par in the final round.
Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open: Earned his second international victory when he captured the Aberdeen Asset management Scottish Open in come-from-behind fashion at Gullane GC in July. After a bogey on the 14th hole Sunday, fell two shots off the lead. He responded with three birdies over his final four holes to catch and pass American Matt Kuchar, who shot a final-round 68 to post the clubhouse lead at 11-under. He made a 9-foot birdie putt at No. 15, made a two-putt birdie at the par-5 16th, parred the 17th then hit his approach shot on the par-4 finishing hole to 2 feet for the tap-in birdie and the title. Joined seven other players who made the Scottish Open their first European Tour win.
Fowler has three tattoos. One is a block "G" near his left elbow in honor of Georgia Veach, the daughter of a Seattle pastor and friend. Georgia was diagnosed with lissencephaly. Fowler got the tattoo just before the 2015 Presidents Cup.[47] The second is from January 2016 and contains the name Yutaka Tanaka (Rickie's grandfather) in Japanese script on his left biceps.[48] The third tattoo came just weeks after playing at the 2016 Summer Olympics and is of the Olympic symbols.[49]

Lowry made his debut for the Glory on 30 January 2016, starting against Melbourne Victory.[61] Lowry then scored his first Perth Glory goal on 20 February 2016 when he scored a header in the 41st minutes, to give Brisbane Roar a thrashing with a 6–3 win for Perth Glory.[62] Throughout the 2015–16 season, Lowry established himself in the starting eleven and formed a central defense partnership with Alex Grant, as he made ten appearance for Perth Glory in his first half of the season.[63]
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.

After Lowry's loan spell at Leeds was coming to an end, on 11 May he signed a new two-year contract extension at Aston Villa. It was a remarkable few days for Lowry, he was promoted with Leeds, received a call up to Australia's World Cup Squad and on the same day he signed a new two-year deal with Villa.[15] Despite signing a contract with the club, Leeds United was considering re-signing him for the second time ahead of the 2010–11 season, but never happened.[16]

At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]
In May 2012, Fowler won the Wells Fargo Championship in Charlotte on the first extra hole of a sudden-death playoff. Replaying the 18th hole, he defeated Rory McIlroy and D. A. Points with a birdie to gain his first PGA Tour win. Fowler shot a 69 (−3) in the final round to finish in a three-way tie after 72 holes at Quail Hollow Club. This win enabled Fowler to break the top-25 in the world, placing him at number 24. The following week at The Players Championship in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Fowler played the final hole at −11 under par and had a birdie opportunity to bring him within one of leader and eventual winner Matt Kuchar. Fowler, however, pushed his putt to the right and finished in a tie for second, the fifth second-place finish of his career.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Finished T6 in a Monday-start-Tuesday-finish event, the season-opening, 54-hole Hyundai Tournament of Champions. The event "started" twice during the regularly scheduled first round Friday and later Sunday, but both times PGA TOUR rules staff halted play due to unplayable windy conditions and subsequently voided all scores that had taken place. As the first player off the tee, he ended up hitting three "opening" shots of the season.
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: Erased a five-stroke deficit in the final round and briefly held the lead before eventually shooting a final-round 70 to finish runner-up in the Memorial Tournament, three shots behind Jason Dufner. Hit a 350-yard drive on the 72nd hole and had just 136 yards to the pin when play was called for inclement weather for the second time during the final round. When play restarted, he made a costly bogey at the last to fall into a tie for second. Ranked No. 1 in fairways hit for the week with 45 of 56. Was also 8 of 11 in sand saves to rank first for the week.
Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open: Earned his second international victory when he captured the Aberdeen Asset management Scottish Open in come-from-behind fashion at Gullane GC in July. After a bogey on the 14th hole Sunday, fell two shots off the lead. He responded with three birdies over his final four holes to catch and pass American Matt Kuchar, who shot a final-round 68 to post the clubhouse lead at 11-under. He made a 9-foot birdie putt at No. 15, made a two-putt birdie at the par-5 16th, parred the 17th then hit his approach shot on the par-4 finishing hole to 2 feet for the tap-in birdie and the title. Joined seven other players who made the Scottish Open their first European Tour win.
In June 2015, he became the first SMU Mustang to win the NCAA individual championship, recording a score of 280 (−8) to win by one stroke.[3] In August, he won the U.S. Amateur title, defeating Derek Bard 7 & 6 in the 36-hole final. He became the fifth player to win both the NCAA and U.S. Amateur titles in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996), and Ryan Moore (2004).[2]
NASSAU, Bahamas — Bryson DeChambeau is the same height as Tiger Woods, but as the two stood on the Albany driving range Monday afternoon, there was no question who was larger. Woods is famous for his love of working out, but these days he’s dwarfed by DeChambeau, who has directed the full force of his obsessive nature towards the gym. This is Bryson’s Bulking Season, and it’s starting to show.
The Honda Classic: After beginning the final round of The Honda Classic with a four-stroke lead, posted a 1-over 71 to win by the same margin for his fourth career PGA TOUR title. It marked the first of five 54-hole leads he converted to victory. Opened with back-to-back 66s for the second consecutive year and posted a 65 in the third round to post the best 54-hole total since the event moved to PGA National in 2007 at 13-under 197. Seized the 54-hole lead with the widest margin of his career entering a final round. Turned in 2-over 37, but posted three birdies on the back nine to take command of the tournament. Despite bogeys on the 71st and 72nd holes, claimed his first victory since the 2015 Dell Technologies Championship. Finished the week second in Strokes Gained: Putting (7.392) and moved to 10th in the FedExCup standings and ninth in the Official World Golf Ranking, his first time in the top 10 since the 2016 BMW Championship.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.

Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
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