At the first FedEx Cup playoff event, Fowler finished T52 at The Barclays in the last week in August. The following week he again finished T52 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup playoff event, after carding a disappointing six-over par final round 77. At that point Fowler was positioned 37 in the FedEx Cup points standings and required a strong performance at the BMW Championship to qualify in the top thirty for The Tour Championship; a performance which eluded him, finishing in 48th place. In finishing 43rd in the FedEx Cup, Fowler earned a $132,000 bonus.[21]
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
After a tie for fifth at the Masters in April, Fowler had his best finish of 2014 at the U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fowler was runner-up with Erik Compton at −1, best finishes for both at a major, but they were eight strokes behind champion Martin Kaymer. Fowler had another second-place finish, at the Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. He began the final round six strokes behind Rory McIlroy and finished the day tied for second with Sergio García at −15, two strokes behind McIlroy. At the next major in August, the PGA Championship, Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson, and McIlroy battled for the title on a rain-soaked Valhalla Golf Club, near Louisville. Despite holding the lead for a good portion of the day, Fowler tied for third. He was only the third player, along with Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods, to have finished in the top 5 in all four majors in one calendar year, but the first not to win (Jordan Spieth became the fourth player in 2015). Fowler had 10 top-10 finishes during the 2013–14 season. His 8th-place finish at The Tour Championship moved him to 10th in the world golf rankings.[25]
On June 3, 2018, DeChambeau won the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, in a sudden-death playoff against Kyle Stanley and An Byeong-hun, after the three finished regulation play tied at −15. After Stanley bogeyed the first hole of sudden death, DeChambeau then proceeded to win with a birdie on the second hole, giving him his second win on the tour.[16]
A better look at my @cobragolf proto irons…second and third pics are top down view of 8 (40°) and 4 (24°) iron…we started working on these back in January…I wanted an old school look (thin/straight top line and no offset) while keeping the benefits of the sole and weight behind the sweet spot (tungsten plugs) these are all hand milled stainless heads…currently working on a pvd finish for the final version…stay tuned👌

Some modern pros, including Woods, have caught flak for working out too hard and wearing down their bodies. For DeChambeau, the philosophy is the exact opposite: His gym inspiration is to stave off a nagging back injury. That injury — which DeChambeau says stems from a childhood trampoline accident plus the wear of hitting nearly infinite range balls — left him in major pain last season. “Sleeping hurt, everything hurt,” he said. “But it’s pretty cool what you can do to the body by working out. Most people say, ‘okay, I just have to sit down and rest, I’ve gotta take time off,’ but I’ve tried that route and I’ve realized that actually makes you worse.”
With this win, he entered the Official World Golf Ranking as an amateur at No. 168[8] and reached a career high of sixth in the World Amateur Golf Ranking.[9] Walker Cup captain Colin Dagleish described the win as "fairytale stuff", adding: "You'd have to say that Shane's victory was the biggest (of the three amateur wins). To win your own national Open is quite something. It was unbelievable, it really was."[7] The win was only the second home victory since 1982 and the first since Pádraig Harrington in 2007.[7] Harrington himself was also full of praise: "It's fabulous for Irish golf. You only have to look at the fact it is such a rarity for an amateur to win, such a rarity for an Irish player to win the Irish Open. So, on a lot of fronts, it is a big deal. It was very impressive."[10]
World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship: In his fourth consecutive start at the World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship, fought his way to the semifinals Sunday morning against Ernie Els. Got off to a hot start, leading for seven of the first nine holes. With a shift of momentum, Els battled back and won three consecutive holes (Nos. 10-12) to gain a 2-up lead. Following an eagle and par on Nos. 13 and 14, he squared up the match. An Els birdie-3 at No. 18 sent the match to extra holes. A birdie-3 at the 19th hole (No. 1) gave him the upset win over Els.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.
Lowry elected to turn professional the week after his Irish Open triumph, meaning that he would miss out on the opportunity to play in the Walker Cup in September 2009.[11] He made his professional début on 28 May at the European Open, where he shot 78 in the first round to end the opening day almost at the back of the field, and went on to miss the cut following a second round 73.[12]
×