Categories: American male golfersOklahoma State Cowboys golfersPGA Tour golfersRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from CaliforniaGolfers from NevadaGolfers from FloridaSportspeople from Anaheim, CaliforniaPeople from Murrieta, CaliforniaSportspeople from Las VegasPeople from Jupiter, FloridaNative American sportspeopleAmerican people of Navajo descentAmerican sportspeople of Japanese descent1988 birthsLiving people
On July 16, 2017, DeChambeau earned his first PGA Tour victory by winning the John Deere Classic by a single stroke over Patrick Rodgers. He carded a round of 65 in the final round to win his maiden title in his 40th start on tour. The win coming the week before, gained DeChambeau a place in the 2017 Open Championship, where he missed the cut after rounds of 76–77 (+13).
Quicken Loans National: Starting the final round of the Quicken Loans National seven shots back, the Quicken Loans ambassador recorded a career-best nine birdies to post his low round of the week, a 5-under 65 to finish T3. Marked his third top-five in his last four starts. Chances for victory took a serious hit with a double bogey (the only one of the final round) on No. 14, the easiest hole in the final round. Marked second top-three finish in six starts at the Quicken Loans National (2015-2nd).

After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.
Categories: 1989 birthsLiving peopleAustralian soccer playersRepublic of Ireland association footballersAustralian people of Irish descentQatar Stars League playersAston Villa F.C. playersLeeds United F.C. playersPlymouth Argyle F.C. playersSheffield United F.C. playersMillwall F.C. playersLeyton Orient F.C. playersBirmingham City F.C. playersPerth Glory FC playersAl Ahli SC (Doha) playersEnglish Football League playersExpatriate footballers in QatarPeople from Perth, Western AustraliaRepublic of Ireland youth international footballersRepublic of Ireland under-21 international footballersAssociation football defenders
Immediately after the Masters in mid-April 2016, DeChambeau turned professional and signed a long-term agreement with Cobra-Puma Golf.[9] He made his pro debut days later at the RBC Heritage in South Carolina and tied for fourth, earning over $259,000.[10][11] The decision to turn professional meant the forfeiture of his exemptions to the U.S. Open at Oakmont and Open Championship at Royal Troon; he qualified his way into the U.S. Open, tied for fifteenth place for over $152,000,[12] and improved his world ranking to 148.
BMW Championship: At No. 22 in the FedExCup standings heading into the third Playoffs event, the BMW Championship, he bogeyed No. 17 in a final-round even-par 72 to miss advancing to the TOUR Championship by half a point, finishing the season No. 31 in the FedExCup standings. Charl Schwartzel fired a final-round 8-under 64 to claim the No. 30 position.
All of DeChambeau's irons and wedges[24] are cut to exactly the same length: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm). Their lie and bounce angle are also the same; only the lofts are different. In addition to the single-length concept, his clubs are unusual for their extremely upright lie angle. [25] DeChambeau keeps the club on the same plane throughout his swing and does not turn his wrists during his swing.[26] In 2011, at the suggestion of his instructor Mike Schy, DeChambeau switched to JumboMax Grips, the largest grips commercially available. The larger grips allow DeChambeau to hold the grips in his palms and not his fingers.
THE PLAYERS Championship: A week after collecting his first PGA TOUR victory, nearly became the first player since David Duval (1997) to post first two TOUR victories in back-to-back weeks, finishing T2 at THE PLAYERS, two strokes behind winner Matt Kuchar. Holed a birdie attempt from 21 feet, 7 inches on the par 3 17th in the final round to move to 11-under but couldn't convert a 7-foot, 7-inch birdie on No. 18 that would have given him the clubhouse lead at 12-under. Recorded his fifth career runner-up finish on TOUR in his 73rd start. His T2 performance came in his third start at THE PLAYERS and first in which he made the 36-hole cut. Moved into contention with a 66 in the third round, a career low at TPC Sawgrass. Entered the final round three shots off the 54-hole pace.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
Born in Modesto, California, to John Howard Aldrich DeChambeau and Janet Louise Druffel, DeChambeau moved to Clovis, east of Fresno, at age seven. He attended Clovis East High School and won the California State Junior Championship at age 16 in 2010. DeChambeau graduated in 2012 and accepted a scholarship to Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, majoring in physics.
After a T-12 finish at the Masters, Fowler earned his first win in over three years with a playoff victory at The Players Championship in May. Trailing Sergio García midway through the final round by five shots, Fowler played the final six holes in 6-under par, including an eagle at the par-5 16th. After a birdie at the famous 17th hole, Fowler's final birdie of the round on 18 left him at 12-under par. Both García and Kevin Kisner had birdie attempts to win at the 18th in regulation, but both missed and the three men went to a three-hole aggregate playoff to decide a winner on holes 16–18. Fowler and Kisner went par-birdie-par to tie at −1 while García's three pars left him at even and he was eliminated. Thus Fowler and Kisner went to sudden death starting at the 17th, where Kisner's tee shot landed within about 12 feet (3.7 m) of the cup. Fowler answered with a shot inside of five feet, and when Kisner's birdie attempt slid by, Fowler responded by making his short birdie to claim the championship. Fowler played his final 10 holes in 8-under par.[26] On July 12, he won the Aberdeen Asset Management Scottish Open on the European Tour, shooting a 12-under-par 268. On September 7, he won the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second FedEx Cup Playoffs event, by one stroke over Henrik Stenson, for his third victory on the PGA Tour.

Waste Management Phoenix Open: Two weeks after the win in Abu Dhabi, made his eighth consecutive start in the Waste Management Phoenix Open, where he found himself three strokes off the lead after 54 holes. A final-round 4-under 67, capped off by a clutch birdie on the 72nd hole, forced sudden death with Hideki Matsuyama. On the fourth extra hole, the par-4 17th, an errant tee shot found the water hazard for the second time of the day. Matsuyama made par to win. Ranked second in Strokes Gained: Tee To Green and T1 in Strokes Gained: Total at TPC Scottsdale.
In February 2010, Fowler finished second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open with a score of 15-under-par at the TPC of Scottsdale course. In June, Fowler notched his third PGA Tour runner-up finish at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Fowler entered the final round in the lead, but shot a 73 to finish behind Justin Rose, who recorded his first PGA Tour victory. This performance took Fowler into the top 50 of the Official World Golf Ranking.
In 2008, Fowler repeated as Sunnehanna Amateur champion. In the first round of the U.S. Open, Fowler shot a −1 (70) and was in a tie for 7th place. He was one of three amateurs to make the cut, along with Derek Fathauer and Michael Thompson. He ended the tournament tied for 60th. In October 2008 Fowler played on the Eisenhower Trophy team that finished second. He was the leading individual player.
×