In March 2011, Rose had a chance to add to his two PGA Tour titles won in 2010, when he entered the final round at the Transitions Championship with a one-stroke lead. However, he shot a three-over-par 74, which included four consecutive bogeys in the middle of the round, to finish five shots behind the champion Gary Woodland. In September 2011, Rose won the BMW Championship, the third of the four FedEx Cup playoff events at Cog Hill Golf & Country Club. This was his first title of the year and third career PGA Tour win. Rose entered the week on the playoff bubble at 34th in the standings, knowing that he needed a good finish to make the final event at East Lake Golf Club. The win elevated him to 3rd in the standings and the position of knowing that if he won the Tour Championship he would be the FedEx champion. A flawless round of 63 on the opening day helped Rose to build a four stroke advantage going into the final round, and even though there was a late wobble with a bogey at the par five 15th, Rose recovered and won by two strokes from John Senden.[20] Rose did not enjoy the same success at the Tour Championship though, when a second round 75 ended his chances of winning. He finished the tournament in a tie for 20th place and 5th on the overall FedEx Cup Standings.
Won his first major championship and fourth PGA TOUR title at the U.S. Open and advanced to the TOUR Championship for the seventh consecutive season (eighth overall), finishing the season No. 15 in the FedExCup standings. Qualified for the Playoffs for the eighth time in his 11th season on TOUR. Recorded eight top-10s, collecting more than six in a single season for the first time in his career, and made 21 cuts in 24 starts.
The Barclays: Shared the 54-hole lead with former U.S. World Cup teammate Matt Kuchar at The Barclays, thanks in large part to a stellar, second-round, 7-under 64. Eventually finished one stroke behind Adam Scott for the second runner-up of his career (2011 Humana Challenge). Strong showing at Liberty National jumped him 50 spots to No. 10 in the FedExCup standings.
Despite his early career struggles, Rose's career soon began to take off and he became established on the European Tour. In 2001 he opened the season with consecutive second-place finishes in the country of his birth, South Africa. He went on to finish the year in top-40 on the Order of Merit. He won his first professional event, the Dunhill Championship in South Africa, in 2002, and followed this up with three further victories in that year. They included another win in South Africa at the Nashua Masters, a win on the Japanese Golf Tour at the Crowns Tournament, and then he won his second European Tour title at the Victor Chandler British Masters, edging out Ian Poulter in the final round.

His ranking continued to fall in early 2005, and in March he announced that he was quitting the European Tour and concentrating on playing on the PGA Tour. This had no apparent effect on his poor form, and by the middle of the year, he had fallen out of the World's top 100. In August of that year, he made an about-face by announcing his intention to return to the European Tour. Later the same week he had his best result of the year, leading the Buick Championship after three rounds before slipping to a third-place finish. A couple of further good results followed late in the 2005 season, and he maintained his status on the PGA Tour after all.
BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 34 in the FedExCup standings and moved to No. 3 with his third-career victory, securing his spot in the following week's TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Opened the event with an 8-under 63, equaling the best opening round in BMW Championship history. He held at least a share of the lead the rest of the way en route to becoming the first European winner of a PGA TOUR Playoffs event and the first to win the BMW Championship since Harry Cooper in 1934. The final round was nip and tuck most of the day with John Senden, but he secured the deal with a chip-in for birdie on the par-4 17th hole from 35 feet, 10 inches on his way to an even-par 71 and a two-stroke victory over Senden. The win was just the second in eight attempts when he's taken the lead/co-lead into the final round on the PGA TOUR.
Rose went to the 18th hole on Sunday tied at −15 with playing partner Henrik Stenson of Sweden, who had just won the 2016 Open Championship at Royal Troon to become the first Scandinavian man to win a major. Rose then produced a backspin pitch that left him with a short birdie putt, which he converted to become the first golfer to win Olympic gold in 112 years, while Stenson underhit his approach and eventually three-putted for bogey and the silver medal. (American Matt Kuchar claimed the bronze medal after shooting 63 on Sunday.)[30] Shortly thereafter, Rose brought his Olympic gold medal to The Barclays at Bethpage Black and wore it around his neck, on the suggestion of playing partner Phil Mickelson's caddy Jim "Bones" McKay and to cheers from the gallery, during his final putt.[31]
I have been playing with Wilsons for years and way back in the 80s also and have everything since the C100s including the C300 and C300 forged and V6s. Love em all, along with the Triton and Cortex and a set of D7s which the Driver is great. I like the Blades but at my age the CBs are more practical. But I have never had any trouble getting anything Leftie. They are all fine clubs and as a former Teacher and Club Maker are real quality.
Quicken Loans National: The defending champion finished T4 in his bid to become the first three-time Quicken Loans National champion. Entered the final round of the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational in a tie for the lead with Jim Furyk in a bid to win his second World Golf Championships event. Finished T3 after a final-round 72. It was the 11th time he has led or tied for the lead going into the final round, of which he has won three times.
The Barclays: Shared the 54-hole lead with former U.S. World Cup teammate Matt Kuchar at The Barclays, thanks in large part to a stellar, second-round, 7-under 64. Eventually finished one stroke behind Adam Scott for the second runner-up of his career (2011 Humana Challenge). Strong showing at Liberty National jumped him 50 spots to No. 10 in the FedExCup standings.
I hadn't played golf in almost 20 years. But started playing again when my oldest daughter started playing on the high school golf team (she just lite... rally started playing golf in April of 2017 when she joined the team). So I was looking for help to get my game back in form, so I could practice with her. I watched a bunch of videos on youtube and even joined some sites, including this one. But Me and My Golf has been the easiest for me to follow, with simple to duplicate drills, and no super long winded mumbo jumbo in between. Plus, they show they like to have a little fun and that's what golf should be about. It has really helped me with my game and I keep improving. Thanks Andy and Piers! Read More
Progress! My handicap has come down from 11 (11.0) to 9 (9.2) in August 2017 across a run of three competition rounds out of four. Back in December 20... 16 I used the fault fixer to help improve ball-striking of my irons. MeAndMyGolf provided me with some videos to help with lag. And in August this started to feed through. MeAndMyGolf works for me better than one-on-one tuition with a teaching pro. I think this is because with the latter my swing is like a house of cards; all parts of the swing become up for grabs and I end up with no swing for at least a year. With MeAndMyGolf, I keep my swing private and only I know how to piece it all together; I can fix one thing at a time and integrate the change into my whole swing. So, on to the next fault to fix for 2018... Read More

In March 2011, Rose had a chance to add to his two PGA Tour titles won in 2010, when he entered the final round at the Transitions Championship with a one-stroke lead. However, he shot a three-over-par 74, which included four consecutive bogeys in the middle of the round, to finish five shots behind the champion Gary Woodland. In September 2011, Rose won the BMW Championship, the third of the four FedEx Cup playoff events at Cog Hill Golf & Country Club. This was his first title of the year and third career PGA Tour win. Rose entered the week on the playoff bubble at 34th in the standings, knowing that he needed a good finish to make the final event at East Lake Golf Club. The win elevated him to 3rd in the standings and the position of knowing that if he won the Tour Championship he would be the FedEx champion. A flawless round of 63 on the opening day helped Rose to build a four stroke advantage going into the final round, and even though there was a late wobble with a bogey at the par five 15th, Rose recovered and won by two strokes from John Senden.[20] Rose did not enjoy the same success at the Tour Championship though, when a second round 75 ended his chances of winning. He finished the tournament in a tie for 20th place and 5th on the overall FedEx Cup Standings.
He usually says whatever pops into his anecdote-filled, zany mind, a trait that has made David Feherty quite popular in his role as a golf commentator for CBS, NBC and Golf Channel. It should also come in handy in this prime-time series, with the bulk of each episode being an interview Feherty conducts with a well-known sports, entertainment or political figure. The former European and PGA tour pro -- a born and bred Irishman who became a U.S. citizen in 2010 -- also shares unique golf stories and his ever-so-present observations on life's peculiarities.
In 2012, Rose won his first World Golf Championship event at the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Doral Golf Resort & Spa, when he finished one stroke ahead of American Bubba Watson. He entered the final round with a three-stroke deficit from Watson, but after a solid final day's play, he took a two-stroke advantage down the notoriously difficult par 4 18th finishing hole. He made bogey however after finding the right rough with his tee shot and could not get up and down from the back of the green. This left Watson requiring a birdie on the hardest hole on the course in the final group behind Rose. Watson hit a tremendous iron shot from the right hand rough to within ten feet, but could not make the resulting putt, leaving Rose to celebrate the biggest win of his career.[21], As a result, Rose returned to the world's top ten, re-entering at number seven.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the fourth time, entering the Playoffs finale in the No. 20 position in the FedExCup standings. Finished T10 at East Lake to end his season No. 20 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 14 top-25 finishes (one shy of benchmark 15 in 2011) from 26 starts. Of those, three were top-five showings, led by a runner-up finish at the Barracuda Championship. Turned in an impressive Playoffs performance, with four top-25 finishes. Closed the Playoffs with a T15 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, T24 at the BMW Championship and T10 at the TOUR Championship, where he improved with each round (72-70-69-67).

On 4 November 2018, Rose defended his title at the Turkish Airlines Open in a playoff over Li Haotong. With the victory, Rose joined Jon Rahm and Alex Norén as multiple Rolex Series winners and represented the first successful title defence of his career. This victory returned Rose to World Number One and earned him $1,166,660.[39] For the following three weeks, the World Number One ranking alternated between Rose and Brooks Koepka. Koepka then kept the top ranking for the final six weeks of 2018, then Rose regained it to begin 2019.
Buick Championship: First was a solo-third at the Buick Championship, where he held the 36- and 54-hole leads. Opened with bogey-free rounds of 65-63 to take a four-shot lead over Ben Curtis and Kevin Sutherland. Led Curtis by one entering final round after a third-round 70, but was overtaken by Brad Faxon (61) and Tjaart van der Walt (64) on Sunday, falling one shot short of a playoff after posting a 1-under-par 69.

Playing on a Major Medical Extension, returned from a long layoff with a missed cut at the Valero Texas Open, followed by a T32 at the HP Byron Nelson Championship. He last competed in July 2009 at the U.S. Bank Championship in Milwaukee and then underwent surgery to repair a torn labrum in his left shoulder on August 12. Began rehab the next day. Ended the season with three made cuts in eights starts, including his first-career top-25 finish (T21 at the John Deere Classic). Also competed in four Korn Ferry Tour events earlier in the season, missing the cut in all those starts.
In September 2006 at the Canadian Open, Rose led a PGA Tour tournament going into the final round for the first time. But he slipped up with a final round 74 which moved him down the field. He went on to finish 2nd at the Valero Texas Open and finished 47th on the money list with US$1.629 million in prize money. In November 2006 he won the Australian Masters, to claim his first title for four years. His renewed consistency, including a top 5 finish at the 2007 Masters which had seen him surpass his previous best world ranking, by reaching number 26 on 8 April 2007.[13]
Won his first major championship and fourth PGA TOUR title at the U.S. Open and advanced to the TOUR Championship for the seventh consecutive season (eighth overall), finishing the season No. 15 in the FedExCup standings. Qualified for the Playoffs for the eighth time in his 11th season on TOUR. Recorded eight top-10s, collecting more than six in a single season for the first time in his career, and made 21 cuts in 24 starts.
World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship: Lost to Rory McIlroy in the championship match at the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship to notch his best finish in the event in three starts. Finished the week 6-1 in his matches at TPC Harding Park. Failed to advance beyond the first round in his previous two attempts at the Cadillac Match Play (2012 and 2014). Birdied the par-5 first hole in six of his seven matches (did not birdie it in the semifinal). He also birdied the first hole as the 19th hole during a playoff with Walker. Was looking to notch a win in three different scoring formats on TOUR (match play, Modified Stableford and stroke play).
World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship: Lost to Rory McIlroy in the championship match at the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship to notch his best finish in the event in three starts. Finished the week 6-1 in his matches at TPC Harding Park. Failed to advance beyond the first round in his previous two attempts at the Cadillac Match Play (2012 and 2014). Birdied the par-5 first hole in six of his seven matches (did not birdie it in the semifinal). He also birdied the first hole as the 19th hole during a playoff with Walker. Was looking to notch a win in three different scoring formats on TOUR (match play, Modified Stableford and stroke play).

Farmers Insurance Open: In his 10th career start at the Farmers Insurance Open, won his 10th PGA TOUR victory with a 21-under 267 at Torrey Pines Golf Course. Tied the 36-hole and 54-hole tournament records and closed with a final-round 3-under 69 to win by two shots over Adam Scott. Became the first player from England to win 10 times on the PGA TOUR (since 1945), surpassing Nick Faldo (9). The victory came in his 326th career TOUR start, at the age of 38 years, 5 months, 28 days. With $1,278,000 winner's check, surpassed $50 million in career earnings ($51,023,355). Became first player since Tiger Woods (2013) to convert 54-hole lead in the Farmers Insurance Open. Became the first winner of the Farmers Insurance Open to win after beginning the week on the North Course since 2010. Won with Gareth Lord (Henrik Stenson's caddie) on the bag in just his second week while regular caddie, Mark Fulcher, recovered from heart surgery. Dedicated the win to Fulcher.
CIMB Classic: In second start of the season, finished second in a playoff to Ryan Moore at the CIMB Classic, the first FedExCup event held in Asia. Recorded rounds of 68-70-67-69 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, narrowly missing a birdie attempt from 15 feet on 72nd hole that would have clinched his third PGA TOUR title. Forced to return Monday due to darkness Sunday evening, Moore birdied the first playoff hole to take the title.
Bold, patriotic designs from Puma’s Volition Collection have helped the reigning U.S. Open champ to carve out a unique look compared to the brand’s other TOUR players. These threads benefit a great cause, too, as Volition supports the families of military heroes through the Folds of Honor Foundation. Look for Puma to hook up Woodland with more limited edition shoes in 2020. 
Fort Worth Invitational: Won the Fort Worth Invitational by three strokes over Brooks Koepka for his second win of the season (Fort Worth Invitational, World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions). Moved to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings following the victory, matching the highest previous position of his career (spent one week at No. 2 following his win at The National in 2010). Matched his previous-best 72-hole score on the PGA TOUR (260/2017 Sony Open in Hawaii) and recorded the lowest 72-hole score on TOUR since the 2017 Wyndham Championship (Henrik Stenson/258). Became the fifth multiple winner of the season (Patton Kizzire, Justin Thomas, Bubba Watson, Jason Day, Justin Rose). Became the fifth international player since 2000 to win the event (Sergio Garcia/2001, Nick Price/2002, Rory Sabbatini/2007, Adam Scott/2014).
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