As it did with its Arnold Palmer film project "Arnie," Golf Channel pays tribute to another legendary figure in the game: 18-time major champion and World Golf Hall of Famer Jack Nicklaus. Succinctly titled "Jack," the three-part biopic is a product of nearly 100 interviews and hundreds of hours of archived film, blending recollections from Nicklaus, as well as his playing competitors, family members, sports legends, business partners, and childhood friends, along with golf and sports media. It begins with Nicklaus' upbringing and his early golf successes, continues with a look at his many on-course career accolades, and concludes by focusing on his lasting legacy as an ambassador to the sport. Additionally, "Jack" features other "Greats of All-Time" in their respective sport, each weighing in on Nicklaus' impact on the larger sporting landscape, including Wayne Gretzky, Richard Petty, Jerry Rice, Annika Sorenstam and Kelly Slater.
Rose went to the 18th hole on Sunday tied at −15 with playing partner Henrik Stenson of Sweden, who had just won the 2016 Open Championship at Royal Troon to become the first Scandinavian man to win a major. Rose then produced a backspin pitch that left him with a short birdie putt, which he converted to become the first golfer to win Olympic gold in 112 years, while Stenson underhit his approach and eventually three-putted for bogey and the silver medal. (American Matt Kuchar claimed the bronze medal after shooting 63 on Sunday.)[30] Shortly thereafter, Rose brought his Olympic gold medal to The Barclays at Bethpage Black and wore it around his neck, on the suggestion of playing partner Phil Mickelson's caddy Jim "Bones" McKay and to cheers from the gallery, during his final putt.[31]
TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola: Seeking to become the first British player to win the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola, finished solo second to Brandt Snedeker at East Lake GC. Shared the first-round lead with Woods, with a 4-under 66, and the 54-hole lead, with Snedeker, at 8-under 202. A final-round, 1-over 71 left him three behind Snedeker and gave him his fourth runner-up finish on the PGA TOUR. Entered the week No. 24 in the FedExCup standings, with his runner-up finish propelling him 18 spots to No. 6–the largest jump of the week (Ryan Moore was second, moving 17 spots from No. 28 to No. 11). Record fell to 2-9 when he has led or held a share of the 54-hole PGA TOUR lead.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the fourth time, entering the Playoffs finale in the No. 20 position in the FedExCup standings. Finished T10 at East Lake to end his season No. 20 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 14 top-25 finishes (one shy of benchmark 15 in 2011) from 26 starts. Of those, three were top-five showings, led by a runner-up finish at the Barracuda Championship. Turned in an impressive Playoffs performance, with four top-25 finishes. Closed the Playoffs with a T15 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, T24 at the BMW Championship and T10 at the TOUR Championship, where he improved with each round (72-70-69-67).
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Delivered the huge potential which first became apparent in the 1998 Open Championship by capturing the Dunhill Championship on the European Tour at the start of the season. Went on to win the Nashua Masters title in South Africa and the Crowns Tournament in Japan. He then claimed the Victor Chandler British Masters after a battle with friend Ian Poulter.
Class is in session with Martin Hall, an award-winning golf teacher who has taught several players on the PGA Tour, Champions Tour and LPGA Tour. Each week his unique teaching style is on display with tips and drills utilizing an in-studio golf simulator. Joined by co-host and former "Big Break" champion Blair O'Neal, Martin also answers plenty of viewer emails and incorporates other forms of social media to help drive the show's content.
He successfully defended his Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship title in 2018 and he came agonisingly close to a first Major Championship when he finished runner up in the US Open Championship at Shinnecock Hills, posting a final round 63 – the equal lowest in a US Open and the lowest final round in any Major Championship – to finish one shot behind Brooks Koepka.
Turkish Airlines Open: Birdied the 72nd hole at the Turkish Airlines Open to make it back-to-back wins following his World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions victory and week earlier and move closer to Tommy Fleetwood at the top of the Race to Dubai Rankings presented by Rolex. High drama ensued at Regnum Carya Golf & Spa Resort as he and playing partner Nicolas Colsaerts were tied at 17-under while on the 18th tee in the final round. Both men put their approaches to eight feet but held his nerve to make a birdie, sign for a 65 and claim a 10th European Tour title. 

Rose publicly focused on the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, where golf was returning as a full event for the first time since 1904 in St. Louis. On the opening day, he became the first ever player to make a hole-in-one in Olympic play after recording it on the 189-yard par-3 4th hole of Gil Hanse's new Olympic Course in Barra da Tijuca using a 7-iron.[28] Described as having an inspiring effect on the rest of the Great Britain team, Rose later gave the golf ball from that hole-in-one to gymnast Nile Wilson, who would go on to win a bronze medal in the horizontal bar.[29]
Turkish Airlines Open: Birdied the 72nd hole at the Turkish Airlines Open to make it back-to-back wins following his World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions victory and week earlier and move closer to Tommy Fleetwood at the top of the Race to Dubai Rankings presented by Rolex. High drama ensued at Regnum Carya Golf & Spa Resort as he and playing partner Nicolas Colsaerts were tied at 17-under while on the 18th tee in the final round. Both men put their approaches to eight feet but held his nerve to make a birdie, sign for a 65 and claim a 10th European Tour title.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Won his third career PGA TOUR title, and first since the 2013 Barracuda Championship, via a playoff at the Waste Management Phoenix Open. Began the final round in Phoenix trailing by three strokes, but closed with a 7-under 64 to enter a playoff with Chez Reavie. Made par on the first extra hole, No. 18, to win his first playoff in three playoff appearances on the PGA TOUR. The win came in his 207th career start at the age of 33 years, 8 months, 14 days. The tournament marked the fourth consecutive week the PGA TOUR went to extra holes, dating to the Sony Open in Hawaii.

Won his first FedExCup, won twice on the PGA TOUR (World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions, Fort Worth Invitational), made his fifth Ryder Cup team and ascended to No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time in his career. Ended the season with 17 made cuts in 18 starts, including double-digit top-10s for the first time in his career (11). Finished in the top five in each of the final three FedExCup Playoffs events. Concluded the season ranked second in Scoring Average (68.99) behind Dustin Johnson (68.69).


Rookie season on the TOUR was cut short in July because of an injury to his left shoulder, which required surgery. Coupled with the $121,031 earned in 2009, had eight events in 2010 to equal that of No. 125 on the 2009 money list ($662,683) and gain a Major Medical Extension for the remainder of the year. Made eight cuts in 18 starts on TOUR in 2009, with a best finish of T28 at the Mayakoba Golf Classic. Finished fifth in Driving Distance (307.3-yard average) in 2009.
His ranking continued to fall in early 2005, and in March he announced that he was quitting the European Tour and concentrating on playing on the PGA Tour. This had no apparent effect on his poor form, and by the middle of the year, he had fallen out of the World's top 100. In August of that year, he made an about-face by announcing his intention to return to the European Tour. Later the same week he had his best result of the year, leading the Buick Championship after three rounds before slipping to a third-place finish. A couple of further good results followed late in the 2005 season, and he maintained his status on the PGA Tour after all.
Rose had seven top-10s in 17 starts, but said on several occasions that his putting was buoying him during weeks when his ball-striking wasn’t crisp. The stats bear that out. He finished a career-high 17th in Strokes Gained: Putting (+0.50). He was 67th in Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee, though. It was his worst showing in that statistic since 2007. The drop was mainly due to his driving accuracy, which dropped from 66% to 60%. It was the fourth-largest drop on TOUR from 2018 to 2019. 
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide: In his sixth start in the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, held 54-hole co-lead with Matt Kuchar and eventual-winner William McGirt but posted 1-over 73 final round to finish T4, his first top-10 in 15 starts this season. Began with a birdie at No. 1 in the final round, but succumbed to three bogeys on his inward nine. Was his second top-10 finish in the Memorial Tournament and supplants sixth place in 2011 as his best showing at Muirfield Village Golf Club.
Woodland held the 36-hole lead at the PGA Championship in 2018 with a total 130, which was a tournament record through the first two rounds. He led by a stroke over Kevin Kisner at the halfway stage. He started the final round at nine under par, three shots behind leader Brooks Koepka. He finished in a tie for sixth with a score of 10 under par, six strokes behind the winner Koepka.[11]
U.S. Open: Entered the final round of the 113th U.S. Open trailing Phil Mickelson by two strokes, but a final-round, even-par 70 was good enough for his first major championship (37th start), defeating Mickelson and Jason Day by two shots. Became the first Englishman winner of the event in 43 years (Tony Jacklin in 1970). The win, which earned him a 10-year U.S. Open exemption and a five-year PGA TOUR exemption, came in his 222nd PGA TOUR start, at age 32 years, 10 months, 17 days. At the 18th hole, made famous by Ben Hogan's famous 1-iron shot in 1950 that led to a par and playoff victory the following day, hit a driver and 4-iron to par the hole and finish 1-over 281. The win was the fourth in a row in a major championship by international players and the seventh in the last 10 years at the U.S. Open (29th overall). The win was the fifth come-from-behind win in as many U.S. Opens hosted by Merion (1934, 1950, 1971 and 1981), and he added his name to a list of winners at the Club including Olin Dutra (1934), Hogan (1950), Lee Trevino (1971) and David Graham (1981).

Moving to his professional career, at the end of 2008, he enrolled in the Qualifying school for the PGA Tour. He performed well there, however, he had to struggle from his debut year, he just made eights cuts in total 18 appearances. He finished in a tie for first at 27-under-par but was edged out for the title by Tiger Woods in his second tournament of 2011, the Bob Hope Classic.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the fourth time, entering the Playoffs finale in the No. 20 position in the FedExCup standings. Finished T10 at East Lake to end his season No. 20 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 14 top-25 finishes (one shy of benchmark 15 in 2011) from 26 starts. Of those, three were top-five showings, led by a runner-up finish at the Barracuda Championship. Turned in an impressive Playoffs performance, with four top-25 finishes. Closed the Playoffs with a T15 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, T24 at the BMW Championship and T10 at the TOUR Championship, where he improved with each round (72-70-69-67).
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