BMW Championship: Entered the BMW Championship No. 34 in the FedExCup standings and moved to No. 3 with his third-career victory, securing his spot in the following week's TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Opened the event with an 8-under 63, equaling the best opening round in BMW Championship history. He held at least a share of the lead the rest of the way en route to becoming the first European winner of a PGA TOUR Playoffs event and the first to win the BMW Championship since Harry Cooper in 1934. The final round was nip and tuck most of the day with John Senden, but he secured the deal with a chip-in for birdie on the par-4 17th hole from 35 feet, 10 inches on his way to an even-par 71 and a two-stroke victory over Senden. The win was just the second in eight attempts when he's taken the lead/co-lead into the final round on the PGA TOUR.
He successfully defended his Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship title in 2018 and he came agonisingly close to a first Major Championship when he finished runner up in the US Open Championship at Shinnecock Hills, posting a final round 63 – the equal lowest in a US Open and the lowest final round in any Major Championship – to finish one shot behind Brooks Koepka.

In March 2011, Woodland won his first PGA Tour title at the Transitions Championship by one stroke when fellow American Webb Simpson missed a par putt on the final hole. Just a few moments earlier Woodland had scrambled a fantastic par from the same position as Simpson on the last, after hitting his second shot over the back of the green. This win secured Woodland a place at the 2011 Masters Tournament and also elevated him to what was then a career high 53rd in the Official World Golf Ranking.[8] He later earned an invitation into the U.S. Open after moving into the Top 50. He left the tournament with an OWGR ranking of 39th. In November 2011, he won the Omega Mission Hills World Cup with Matt Kuchar. He finished 2011 ranked 17th on the PGA Tour money list and 51st in the OWGR. He had ended 2009 ranked 962 and 2010 591.[9]

Bob Hope Chrysler Classic: Early in the TOUR season, had another near-miss at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, where he held or shared the lead after the second, third and fourth rounds. Entered the final round tied with Lucas Glover at 20-under par. Posted 76 in the wind-blown final round to finish third, missing a birdie putt on the 90th hole that would have forced a three-way playoff.
In 2010, Rose had a third place at the Honda Classic, and then he broke through with a victory at the Memorial Tournament with a final round 66 to win by three strokes over Rickie Fowler. This was his first win on American soil.[18] The next day, Rose had to try to qualify for the U.S. Open, along with runner-up Rickie Fowler. Neither qualified which raised questions about the qualifications of the U.S. Open.[19] In his first tournament start since his win, at the Travelers Championship two weeks later, Rose led by three shots entering the final round, but fell away to a tie for ninth. His good form continued in the following week's tournament, however, where he led by four shots after three rounds and shot a final-round even par 70 to win his second PGA Tour event – the AT&T National.
AT&T National: Held on for a victory at the AT&T National, his second victory of the season and of his career. Held a five-stroke lead entering the final nine, hit every green in regulation and made seven consecutive pars to finish the tournament and beat Ryan Moore by one stroke. Moore one-putted his last eight greens, including a 12-foot par putt on the 18th hole, for a Sunday-best 65 to make it a battle. Rose two-putted up a dangerous ridge on the tough 17th for par. And with the Fourth of July fireworks booming in the distance, he hit the fairway and green for one last par on the final hole. Rose finished the AT&T National at 10-under 270.

Bob Hope Chrysler Classic: Early in the TOUR season, had another near-miss at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, where he held or shared the lead after the second, third and fourth rounds. Entered the final round tied with Lucas Glover at 20-under par. Posted 76 in the wind-blown final round to finish third, missing a birdie putt on the 90th hole that would have forced a three-way playoff.
The Greenbrier Classic: Opened with a 5-under 65 to sit just one shot behind Trevor Immelman after the first round of The Greenbrier Classic and hung around the lead the rest of the tournament. Final-round, 1-under 69 left him T4 and one stroke shy of the three-man playoff won by Scott Stallings. It was his sixth top-10 of the season, propelling him to No. 7 in the FedExCup standings.
In 2003, Rose reached number 33 in the Official World Golf Ranking. He earned enough money to claim his PGA Tour card as a non-member for 2004 after finishing with more money than the 125th ranked player on the money list. In 2004, he played mostly in America on the PGA Tour, while also maintaining his membership on the European Tour. He did not have a great year and slipped out of the top 50 in the world rankings; however, he kept his tour card after earning in excess of a million dollars.
the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide Insurance: Overcame a four-stroke deficit with a final-round 66 to win the Memorial Tournament for his first PGA TOUR title. Ran off three consecutive birdies before the turn, made a 20-foot par putt to keep his momentum, then seized control when third-round leader Rickie Fowler took a double bogey with a tee shot into the water on the 12th hole. Fowler shot 73 to finish three shots behind. Finished at 18-under 270 with three rounds in the 60s at Muirfield Village GC.
TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola: Seeking to become the first British player to win the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola, finished solo second to Brandt Snedeker at East Lake GC. Shared the first-round lead with Woods, with a 4-under 66, and the 54-hole lead, with Snedeker, at 8-under 202. A final-round, 1-over 71 left him three behind Snedeker and gave him his fourth runner-up finish on the PGA TOUR. Entered the week No. 24 in the FedExCup standings, with his runner-up finish propelling him 18 spots to No. 6–the largest jump of the week (Ryan Moore was second, moving 17 spots from No. 28 to No. 11). Record fell to 2-9 when he has led or held a share of the 54-hole PGA TOUR lead.
Andy and Piers met playing junior golf at Oxley Park Golf Club in England back in 1994. They quickly developed a strong friendship on and off the golf course, competing with and against each other before both turning professional and joining the PGA in their early 20’s. Me and My Golf was created to share their love and passion with as many golfers as possible around the world. 
In April 2017, Rose shot opening rounds of 71-72 at the Masters to enter the weekend as one of only a handful of players under par. In the third round, he fired a five-under round of 67 to co-lead through 54 holes with Sergio García. His round consisted of seven birdies, which resulted in a 31 on the back nine to move into contention for his second major championship. Rose lost to García in a sudden-death playoff.[32]
“I am thrilled to be joining Hublot as their newest ambassador, a brand I have long had an affinity for. To welcome Hublot into the game I love so much is truly an honour. Much like the mechanics of Hublot’s watches, I work tirelessly to ingrain precise movements in my swing, I look forward to representing Hublot as I continue my pursuit of excellence on the global stage.”Find out more about Hublot watches on www.hublot.com
The Barclays: Shared the 54-hole lead with former U.S. World Cup teammate Matt Kuchar at The Barclays, thanks in large part to a stellar, second-round, 7-under 64. Eventually finished one stroke behind Adam Scott for the second runner-up of his career (2011 Humana Challenge). Strong showing at Liberty National jumped him 50 spots to No. 10 in the FedExCup standings.
Categories: English male golfersEuropean Tour golfersPGA Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for EuropeOlympic golfers of Great BritainGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsMedalists at the 2016 Summer OlympicsOlympic gold medallists for Great BritainOlympic medalists in golfMembers of the Order of the British EmpireEnglish expatriates in the United StatesSportspeople from JohannesburgPeople from Fleet, HampshireSportspeople from LondonSportspeople from Orlando, Florida1980 birthsLiving people
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Won his first major championship and fourth PGA TOUR title at the U.S. Open and advanced to the TOUR Championship for the seventh consecutive season (eighth overall), finishing the season No. 15 in the FedExCup standings. Qualified for the Playoffs for the eighth time in his 11th season on TOUR. Recorded eight top-10s, collecting more than six in a single season for the first time in his career, and made 21 cuts in 24 starts.
Rookie season on the TOUR was cut short in July because of an injury to his left shoulder, which required surgery. Coupled with the $121,031 earned in 2009, had eight events in 2010 to equal that of No. 125 on the 2009 money list ($662,683) and gain a Major Medical Extension for the remainder of the year. Made eight cuts in 18 starts on TOUR in 2009, with a best finish of T28 at the Mayakoba Golf Classic. Finished fifth in Driving Distance (307.3-yard average) in 2009.
Moving to his professional career, at the end of 2008, he enrolled in the Qualifying school for the PGA Tour. He performed well there, however, he had to struggle from his debut year, he just made eights cuts in total 18 appearances. He finished in a tie for first at 27-under-par but was edged out for the title by Tiger Woods in his second tournament of 2011, the Bob Hope Classic.
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