Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard: Finished T9 for his fourth top-10 finish in 11 starts at the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard. Opened with under-par scores of 68-66-71 and entered the final round trailing 54-hole leader Jason Day by four strokes before a 1-over 73 left him T9 and seven behind Day. It marked his fifth finish of T17 or better in his first six starts of the season.
Earned 10th career PGA TOUR title at the Farmers Insurance Open and qualified for the FedExCup Playoffs for the 13th time, advancing to the TOUR Championship for the 10th time in the FedExCup era before ending the season tied for 26th in the standings. Became the first player from England to reach the 10-win mark on TOUR since 1945 and one of nine players to qualify for the Playoffs in each of the first 13 seasons of the FedExCup era. Earned seven top-10s and missed just one cut in 17 starts.

Bold, patriotic designs from Puma’s Volition Collection have helped the reigning U.S. Open champ to carve out a unique look compared to the brand’s other TOUR players. These threads benefit a great cause, too, as Volition supports the families of military heroes through the Folds of Honor Foundation. Look for Puma to hook up Woodland with more limited edition shoes in 2020. 

Fleetwood had a distinguished amateur career which included wins in the 2009 Scottish Amateur Stroke Play Championship[2] and the 2010 English Amateur,[3] and runner-up finishes in the 2008 Amateur Championship, the 2010 New South Wales Amateur and the 2010 Spanish Amateur and the 2010 European Amateur. He represented Great Britain and Ireland in the Walker Cup in 2009. He also reached number 3 in The R&A's World Amateur Golf Ranking, and number 1 on the Scratch Players World Amateur Rankings.[4] In July 2010 Fleetwood finished as runner-up to Daniel Gaunt in the English Challenge on Europe's second tier Challenge Tour.[5] He won the English Amateur at the beginning of August and turned professional shortly afterwards.
Rose had seven top-10s in 17 starts, but said on several occasions that his putting was buoying him during weeks when his ball-striking wasn’t crisp. The stats bear that out. He finished a career-high 17th in Strokes Gained: Putting (+0.50). He was 67th in Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee, though. It was his worst showing in that statistic since 2007. The drop was mainly due to his driving accuracy, which dropped from 66% to 60%. It was the fourth-largest drop on TOUR from 2018 to 2019. 
Sentry Tournament of Champions: Collected second runner-up result of the season at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, finishing one shot behind Xander Schauffele at 22-under 270. Began the final round with a three-shot lead and closed with a 68 against Schauffele's 62. Fell to 0-for-7 with the 54-hole lead/co-lead at stroke-play events in his career (converted 54-hole lead to victory at the 2013 Reno-Tahoe Tournament, which used Modified Stableford scoring format). Prior to four rounds in the 60s for the week (67-67-68-68), had just one sub-70 scores in eight rounds at the event (67/R3/2014). Received word Friday night that his grandmother had passed away in Kansas.
Rose went to the 18th hole on Sunday tied at −15 with playing partner Henrik Stenson of Sweden, who had just won the 2016 Open Championship at Royal Troon to become the first Scandinavian man to win a major. Rose then produced a backspin pitch that left him with a short birdie putt, which he converted to become the first golfer to win Olympic gold in 112 years, while Stenson underhit his approach and eventually three-putted for bogey and the silver medal. (American Matt Kuchar claimed the bronze medal after shooting 63 on Sunday.)[30] Shortly thereafter, Rose brought his Olympic gold medal to The Barclays at Bethpage Black and wore it around his neck, on the suggestion of playing partner Phil Mickelson's caddy Jim "Bones" McKay and to cheers from the gallery, during his final putt.[31]
The Open Championship: Made just three birdies in the first 36 holes of the 147th Open Championship at Carnoustie, highlighted by a 14-foot putt on the final hole Friday to make the cut on the number after rounds of 72-73 before finishing T2. Produced seven birdies against no bogeys in a third-round 7-under 64 which marked his first sub-65 score any major championship. His inward-nine 5-under 30 marked the low nine of any player in the last three Opens at Carnoustie (1999, 2007, 2018), while his 64 matched the lowest round in an Open Championship held at Carnoustie (Steve Stricker/R3/2007, Richard Green/R4/2007). Posted the clubhouse lead at 6-under 278 which was beaten by Francesco Molinari at 8-under.
At the U.S. Open in June 2019, Woodland held the 54-hole lead at Pebble Beach Golf Links. On Sunday, he shot a 2-under-par 69 for 271 (−13), which gave him a three-shot margin over the runner-up, two-time defending champion Koepka. Woodland became the fourth champion in U.S. Open history who was double-digits under-par. The victory was his first major and his sixth professional win. In his previous thirty starts in majors, Woodland had only carded two top-ten finishes, both in the PGA Championship (2018, 2019).[14] The win at the U.S. Open moved him from 25th to 12th in the Official World Golf Ranking.[15]. At the post-win press conference, Woodland Facetimed Bockerstette live, telling her "I used your positive energy." Two days later, Woodland joined Bockerstette with a surprise appearance on The Today Show where, pointing to the U.S. Open trophy in Bockerstette's hands, he told her "We won this together."[16]

Rose went to the 18th hole on Sunday tied at −15 with playing partner Henrik Stenson of Sweden, who had just won the 2016 Open Championship at Royal Troon to become the first Scandinavian man to win a major. Rose then produced a backspin pitch that left him with a short birdie putt, which he converted to become the first golfer to win Olympic gold in 112 years, while Stenson underhit his approach and eventually three-putted for bogey and the silver medal. (American Matt Kuchar claimed the bronze medal after shooting 63 on Sunday.)[30] Shortly thereafter, Rose brought his Olympic gold medal to The Barclays at Bethpage Black and wore it around his neck, on the suggestion of playing partner Phil Mickelson's caddy Jim "Bones" McKay and to cheers from the gallery, during his final putt.[31]
Bold, patriotic designs from Puma’s Volition Collection have helped the reigning U.S. Open champ to carve out a unique look compared to the brand’s other TOUR players. These threads benefit a great cause, too, as Volition supports the families of military heroes through the Folds of Honor Foundation. Look for Puma to hook up Woodland with more limited edition shoes in 2020. 
I hadn't played golf in almost 20 years. But started playing again when my oldest daughter started playing on the high school golf team (she just lite... rally started playing golf in April of 2017 when she joined the team). So I was looking for help to get my game back in form, so I could practice with her. I watched a bunch of videos on youtube and even joined some sites, including this one. But Me and My Golf has been the easiest for me to follow, with simple to duplicate drills, and no super long winded mumbo jumbo in between. Plus, they show they like to have a little fun and that's what golf should be about. It has really helped me with my game and I keep improving. Thanks Andy and Piers! Read More

Sentry Tournament of Champions: Collected second runner-up result of the season at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, finishing one shot behind Xander Schauffele at 22-under 270. Began the final round with a three-shot lead and closed with a 68 against Schauffele's 62. Fell to 0-for-7 with the 54-hole lead/co-lead at stroke-play events in his career (converted 54-hole lead to victory at the 2013 Reno-Tahoe Tournament, which used Modified Stableford scoring format). Prior to four rounds in the 60s for the week (67-67-68-68), had just one sub-70 scores in eight rounds at the event (67/R3/2014). Received word Friday night that his grandmother had passed away in Kansas.
I was a bit skeptical about spending $10 or so a month on two blokes telling me how to swing a golf club on the net, how wrong was I. I just wanted to... say a massive thank you to you both, my game has improved so much in the 4 months that I've been a member and now all I want to do is play or hit balls at the range. Also, Andy did a little segment on chipping from the rough and coming down onto the ball.....well anyway I had a shot like that and I thought to myself what did the boys tell me to do. I was literally 5cm away from the water in sand with little back swing, so I've come down on to the ball and I got out (it didn't go far, but I got out) with out dropping a shot, so again thank you so so much for your great videos, loving every one of them. Cheers! Read More

Despite his early career struggles, Rose's career soon began to take off and he became established on the European Tour. In 2001 he opened the season with consecutive second-place finishes in the country of his birth, South Africa. He went on to finish the year in top-40 on the Order of Merit. He won his first professional event, the Dunhill Championship in South Africa, in 2002, and followed this up with three further victories in that year. They included another win in South Africa at the Nashua Masters, a win on the Japanese Golf Tour at the Crowns Tournament, and then he won his second European Tour title at the Victor Chandler British Masters, edging out Ian Poulter in the final round.
In September 2006 at the Canadian Open, Rose led a PGA Tour tournament going into the final round for the first time. But he slipped up with a final round 74 which moved him down the field. He went on to finish 2nd at the Valero Texas Open and finished 47th on the money list with US$1.629 million in prize money. In November 2006 he won the Australian Masters, to claim his first title for four years. His renewed consistency, including a top 5 finish at the 2007 Masters which had seen him surpass his previous best world ranking, by reaching number 26 on 8 April 2007.[13]
Rose publicly focused on the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, where golf was returning as a full event for the first time since 1904 in St. Louis. On the opening day, he became the first ever player to make a hole-in-one in Olympic play after recording it on the 189-yard par-3 4th hole of Gil Hanse's new Olympic Course in Barra da Tijuca using a 7-iron.[28] Described as having an inspiring effect on the rest of the Great Britain team, Rose later gave the golf ball from that hole-in-one to gymnast Nile Wilson, who would go on to win a bronze medal in the horizontal bar.[29]
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