Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]
“I had a little bit of run-in with them, because they only test 30 players. I thought it was a little bit unfair,” Schauffele said after his Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero was dinged on Tuesday. “I would gladly give up my driver if it’s not conforming. But there’s still 130 other players in the field that potentially have a nonconforming driver as well.”
PGA Championship: Angling to become just the second player to successfully defend a PGA Championship crown (Tiger Woods, 2000 and 2007), posted back-to-back 67s on the weekend at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. At 10-under 270, finished T6. Was tied for the lead at one point Sunday, before two bogeys on his last five holes resulted in the T6 showing. Had he won, he would have become the first player to win the week before winning a major championship title since Rory McIlroy in 2014 (WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, PGA Championship).
Won his seventh career PGA TOUR title at THE NORTHERN TRUST, the first event of the FedExCup Playoffs, clinching his sixth consecutive appearance in the TOUR Championship before finishing tied for ninth in the FedExCup standings. Made the Playoffs for the seventh time in his seventh season on TOUR. Earned five top-10s and made 22 cuts in 25 starts.
After the U.S. Open, Rahm turned professional, which meant that he forfeited his exemption into the 2016 Open Championship. The next week Rahm played in his first event as a pro at the Quicken Loans National. He held or shared the lead for the first two rounds and finished tied for third place, four strokes behind the winner, Billy Hurley III.[11] The finish was enough for Rahm to regain entry into The Open, as the Quicken Loans National was part of the Open Qualifying Series. Rahm finished tied runner-up in the RBC Canadian Open, securing Special Temporary Member status for the remainder of the season.[12] He gained enough points as a non-member to earn a PGA Tour card for 2017.
Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]
In the following week's tournament, the Sony Open in Hawaii, Thomas became the seventh player in PGA Tour history to shoot a 59. During the first round, he opened his round with an eagle and needed to make an eagle on the ninth, his last hole of the day, to shoot 59.[11] He became the youngest player to shoot a sub-60 round. Thomas finished with rounds of 64, 65, and 65 to win the tournament by 7 strokes. He set tournament records for 18, 36, 54, and 72 holes (59, 123, 188, and 253, respectively). He set PGA Tour records at 36 and 72 holes and tied the 54-hole record.[12]

Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Teamed with Ryan Palmer to claim his third TOUR victory at the Zurich Classic on New Orleans. At 26-under 262, posted a three-stroke win over Sergio Garcia/Tommy Fleetwood. Team sat T17 after first-round 64 in Four-ball format but captured solo lead through 36 holes at 15-under following a 7-under 65 in Foursomes, the first score of 65 or lower at the event in that format. Went on to share the 54-hole lead with Scott Stallings/Trey Mullinax. Only previous appearance at the event before victory was a missed cut with Wesley Bryan in 2018.
Categories: American male golfersAugusta Jaguars men's golfersPGA Tour golfersEuropean Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from TexasSportspeople from San AntonioSportspeople from Harris County, TexasPeople from Spring, Texas1990 birthsLiving people
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fourth consecutive season, making it to the TOUR Championship for the third consecutive time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 2 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T24 at East Lake to end his season a career-best No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 18 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, 11 were top-10 showings, including his first FedExCup Playoffs victory at The Barclays. Eleven top-10s was second only to Dustin Johnson who led the TOUR with 15.
Season highlighted by his first major championship title and sixth career PGA TOUR win. Made 20 cuts in 26 starts with seven top-10s among 12 top-25s. Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the sixth consecutive season and the TOUR Championship for the fifth time in a row. Ended the season at No. 22 in the FedExCup following a 28th-place result at the TOUR Championship. Earned a spot on the U.S. Ryder Cup team for the third consecutive time.
Thomas comes from a long line of professional golfers. His father (who is also his swing coach) served as Head Professional at the Harmony Landing Country Club in Goshen, Kentucky, while his grandfather was a 60-year veteran of the PGA Tour who played in the 1962 U.S. Open. Thomas’s golfing skills were evident early on. Prior to his junior year in high school, in 2009, he amazingly finished third in a PGA Tour event, the Wyndham Championship, where at the age of just 16 years, 3 months, and 23 days he became just the third youngest player in history to make the cut on the PGA Tour. In 2012, while at the University of Alabama, he won both the Haskins and the Nicklaus awards, given annually to the country’s top collegiate golfer, and he turned professional the following year at age 20. He won his first tournament on the Web.com tour in 2014 and registered his first PGA victory at CIMB Classic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2016.
The following week, Thomas lost in a sudden-death playoff to Phil Mickelson, at the WGC-Mexico Championship. He had been even par for the tournament after the first two rounds, but then shot 62-64 over the weekend for a total of 16 under par. To finish his final round, Thomas holed his second shot to the 18th for eagle. Thomas lost the playoff to par, after going over the back of the green in the first extra hole and failing to up and down for par. Thomas moved to number two in the world rankings, a career best ranking.

Reed followed his bogey at 11 with another bogey at 12, then found his footing with birdies at 14, 15 and 18 to get back to what he thought was a round of even-par 72. Playing partner Gary Woodland rolled in a 40-footer on the 17th hole and stuck his approach at 18 inside two feet; he posted 13-under to take an apparent one-stroke lead over Reed and Henrik Stenson heading to the final day. Reed would be paired with Tiger Woods in the final round as the two tried to chase down the leaders.
World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: Advanced to the final in his first appearance at World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play where he lost to Dustin Johnson on the final hole. Was 1-down standing on 18 tee with the honor before hitting tee shot 382 yards over the green. A poor chip and two putts led to a halved hole and handshake with Johnson, who made a regulation par. Was seeking his second TOUR win in 21st career start which would have matched Tiger Woods' achievement. Was the first player from Spain to reach the final. 7-and-5 win over Soren Kjeldsen in quarterfinal matched Daniel Berger's 7-and-5 win over J.B. Holmes in round one as largest winning margin of the week.
CIMB Classic: In defense of his CIMB Classic title in Malaysia, opened and closed with 8-under 64s to claim a three-stroke victory over Hideki Matsuyama at 23-under 265. Began the final round at TPC Kuala Lumpur trailing 54-hole leader Anirban Lahiri by four strokes. When Lahiri took a quadruple bogey-9 at No. 3, Thomas took the lead with six birdies in his first 10 holes. With the win, joined Ryan Moore (2013-14) as players to successfully defend a CIMB Classic title. Became the first player to have his first two PGA TOUR victories come at the same event since Matt Every at the 2014 and 2015 Arnold Palmer Invitational. Made 29 birdies for the week, bringing his total through the first two events of the season to 52 birdies and one eagle, a value of $13,250 to the Hurricane Matthew relief efforts.
He won the Mark H. McCormack Medal in 2015 as the leading player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking, which qualified him for the following year's U.S. Open and Open Championship.[9] He closed out his collegiate career by winning the Pac-12 Conference championship and an NCAA regional championship before finishing tied for third in the national championship. He was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, finishing his final tournament as an amateur in a tie for 23rd place at 7-over-par.[10]

Reed shot 69-66 to lead the 2018 Masters Tournament by two strokes after two rounds. He followed up that performance with two eagles on the back nine for a 67 on Saturday. Entering the final round, he led the Masters by three strokes over Rory McIlroy.[37] On Sunday April 8, 2018, McIlroy faltered and Reed fought off the final round comeback bids of Jordan Spieth and Rickie Fowler to win the green jacket, shooting 71 (−1) for a tournament total of 273 (−15).[38] Reed moved up to No. 11 in the world rankings and collected a paycheck of $1.98 million.[39]
During the third round of the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills, Thomas equalled the U.S. Open single-round record of 63. He eagled the last hole by hitting his 3-wood to 8 feet on the par-5 hole to finish at 9-under-par, also a U.S. Open record, passing the previous record held by Johnny Miller at Oakmont Country Club. In the fourth round, he played alongside Brian Harman in the final grouping, the first time he had done that in a major championship. He shot a three-over-par 75 and finished in a tie for ninth place.
DEAN & DELUCA Invitational: The two-time Hogan Award winner (given annually onsite Monday of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational) trailed 54-hole leader Webb Simpson by four strokes at the start of the final round of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational. After a bogey on the par-4 third, made five birdies en route to a 4-under 66. Barely missed a 12'2" putt on the last for birdie to force a playoff with Kevin Kisner. Marked his seventh top-10 finish in 14 starts this season, with four inside the top three. Was looking to join fellow Spaniard Sergio Garcia on the list of players to win the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational in their first appearance.
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