Schauffele was the only golfer to publicly announce that his driver had failed a test earlier in the week. He also said that he made his displeasure known afterwards with The R&A. “I had a word with them and hopefully they take my comments seriously and my concerns, just because it wasn’t my plan to show up Monday morning of a major or Tuesday — sorry, it was Tuesday evening — where I was doing driver testing here. It’s not really what players want to be doing.”

It was no surprise, then, that Reed drew a poor lie in an indentation in the sand. What was surprising was what happened next: Reed took two practice swings that would face significant scrutiny over the coming hours. On the first practice swing, he placed his club on the sand behind his ball, took it club low and away, and scraped a quantity of sand from behind his ball. His second practice swing was slightly more square to the target, and as he pulled the club away he scraped an additional bit of sand out of the way. It looked pretty cut-and-dry: there had been sand in the way, and Reed cleared a path.
Deutsche Bank Championship: Making his third career start at the Deutsche Bank Championship, carded matching middle rounds of 4-under 67 and a final-round, 1-under 70 to T4, seven strokes behind Rickie Fowler. The finish marked his fourth top-10 of the season but first since a playoff loss in March at the Valspar Championship. Later finished T28 at the BMW Championship.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth consecutive time, making it to the TOUR Championship for the fourth time in a row. Ended his season at No. 22 in the FedExCup. Made 25 cuts in 29 starts while posting 15 top-25 finishes, including four top-10s. After at least one victory in each of the four previous seasons, went winless in the 2016-17, with a best result of T2 at the PGA Championship. Played for the U.S. Presidents Cup team at Liberty National, going 3-1-1, losing to Louis Oosthuizen in Sunday's Singles.

Dell Technologies Championship: With rounds of 71-67-63, entered the final round of the Dell Technologies Championship tied with Marc Leishman at 12-under 201. Went on to record a 5-under 66 on Labor Day for a three-stroke victory over Jordan Spieth, relegating his friend to his second consecutive runner-up finish to start the FedExCup Playoffs. With his fifth victory of the season (the most on TOUR since Spieth and Jason Day had the same number in 2015), moved from No. 3 to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings, just 27 points behind Spieth. Overall, marked his sixth PGA TOUR victory in his 92nd start at the age of 24 years, 4 months, 6 days. Moved to four of six when carrying the lead/co-lead into the final round on TOUR. Week included a third-round 63 (his eighth round of 63 or better on TOUR), which featured 12 3s, the most ever recorded in a single FedExCup Playoffs event. Win was the 11th in the last 13 FedExCup Playoffs events won by a player under the age of 30. The victory was his TOUR-leading 11th top-10 finish of the season, staying one clear of Spieth.
DP World Tour Championship Dubai: Carded a final-round 67 to win the European Tour's DP World Tour Championship in Dubai, where a late slip from Justin Rose handed Tommy Fleetwood the Race to Dubai title. Came home in 33 to get to 19-under and win his second Rolex Series title by one shot over Shane Lowry and Kiradech Aphibarnrat. Awarded the European Tour's Sir Henry Cotton Rookie of the Year award earlier in the week, added this win to his Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation title to become the first player to win multiple Rolex Series events.
Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]
Born and raised in San Diego, California, Xander Schauffele fixed his sights on golf at the young age of 10. His father, a graduate of San Diego Golf Academy (now Golf Academy of America), encouraged his interest and to this day is his only swing coach. Schauffele played golf for Scripps Ranch High School, then Long Beach State University and San Diego State University. Among other early accolades, he won the individual title of the 2011 California State High School Championship and is the 2014 California State Amateur champion.
Reed followed his bogey at 11 with another bogey at 12, then found his footing with birdies at 14, 15 and 18 to get back to what he thought was a round of even-par 72. Playing partner Gary Woodland rolled in a 40-footer on the 17th hole and stuck his approach at 18 inside two feet; he posted 13-under to take an apparent one-stroke lead over Reed and Henrik Stenson heading to the final day. Reed would be paired with Tiger Woods in the final round as the two tried to chase down the leaders.
Fowler’s view was echoed by tens of thousands of viewers across the world; Reed’s case looked like a cut-and-dry example of skirting the rules, clearing a slightly better path and gaining a small advantage over the field. A violation of the Rules of Golf is always news; that’s true because of the game’s call-your-own-fouls nature. But with Reed, things are slightly different. Fair or not, the golf public (particularly on the internet) are liable to dunk on any Reed misstep, warranted or not. So let’s review what we concretely know about this situation, which quickly turned to golf’s Code Red.
Genesis Open: Entering the final round with a four-shot lead, recorded a 4-over 75 to finish runner-up at the Genesis Open, one stroke behind J.B. Holmes. 54-hole score of 196 matched the tournament record (Mike Weir/2004, Dustin Johnson/2017). Marked the first time he failed to win after posting a 54-hole score of 196 or better (2015 CIMB Classic/196/Won, 2017 Sony Open in Hawaii/188/Won, 2018 WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational/196/Won, 2019 Genesis Open/196/2nd). Led the field in birdies with 23.

In the following week's tournament, the Sony Open in Hawaii, Thomas became the seventh player in PGA Tour history to shoot a 59. During the first round, he opened his round with an eagle and needed to make an eagle on the ninth, his last hole of the day, to shoot 59.[11] He became the youngest player to shoot a sub-60 round. Thomas finished with rounds of 64, 65, and 65 to win the tournament by 7 strokes. He set tournament records for 18, 36, 54, and 72 holes (59, 123, 188, and 253, respectively). He set PGA Tour records at 36 and 72 holes and tied the 54-hole record.[12]
PGA Championship: With a final-round 3-under 68 (including six birdies and three bogeys) leading to a 72-hole score of 8-under 276, finished two strokes clear of Francesco Molinari, Patrick Reed and Louis Oosthuizen to win his first major championship title (in 10 major starts) at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club. While his round included multiple highlights – including a 36-foot birdie putt on No. 9, a 40-foot chip in for birdie on No. 13 and a perfectly struck 7 iron from 221 yards to 15 feet for birdie on the par-3 17th hole – it was the 10th hole that will be the most memorable moment of his victory. His eight-foot birdie putt on the 10th hole somehow failed to go in, hanging on the lip for 12 seconds before finally falling in. Won for the fifth time on the PGA TOUR, with four of those victories coming during the 2016-17 season. Coupled with Jordan Spieth's victory at The Open Championship, marked the first time since 1923 (Bobby Jones/U.S. Open, Gene Sarazen/PGA Championship) that different players aged 25 or younger won in back-to-back majors. The son of Mike and Jani Thomas, his victory marked the eighth time the son of a PGA of America Professional won the PGA Championship, most recently by Keegan Bradley in 2011. Winning in his 90th career start at the age of 24 years, 3 months and 15 days, notched the 26th win by a player in his 20s on TOUR during the season. Collected 600 points to move from No. 4 to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings. In addition, earned a five-year exemption on the PGA TOUR. Entered the final round trailing Kevin Kisner by two strokes, marking the 15th come-from-behind victory in the last 17 PGA TOUR events.
Schauffele was the only golfer to publicly announce that his driver had failed a test earlier in the week. He also said that he made his displeasure known afterwards with The R&A. “I had a word with them and hopefully they take my comments seriously and my concerns, just because it wasn’t my plan to show up Monday morning of a major or Tuesday — sorry, it was Tuesday evening — where I was doing driver testing here. It’s not really what players want to be doing.”
Season highlighted by three wins and a seventh-place finish in his FedExCup title defense. Made the cut in 21 of 23 starts, earning double-digit top-10s (10) for the second consecutive season and reaching 20 top-25s for the first time in his career. Became the first player since Tiger Woods in 2006 and 2007 to lead the TOUR in earnings in consecutive seasons. Accumulated a score of 155-under-par for the season, second-best on TOUR (Dustin Johnson, 189-under). Earned inaugural appearance on the United States Ryder Cup team.
Adept at the long put and renowned as one of the game’s foremost power players and big hitters, Thomas has shot some of the lowest scores in golfing history. In winning his first PGA event, he shot a course record 61, and at the Sony Open in Hawaii in 2017, he shot a 59 and became the youngest player in PGA history to shoot a sub-60 score, going on to win by seven shots. And at the 2017 U.S. Open in Erin Hills in Wisconsin, he equalled that major’s lowest round score, shooting a 63.
Reed shot 69-66 to lead the 2018 Masters Tournament by two strokes after two rounds. He followed up that performance with two eagles on the back nine for a 67 on Saturday. Entering the final round, he led the Masters by three strokes over Rory McIlroy.[37] On Sunday April 8, 2018, McIlroy faltered and Reed fought off the final round comeback bids of Jordan Spieth and Rickie Fowler to win the green jacket, shooting 71 (−1) for a tournament total of 273 (−15).[38] Reed moved up to No. 11 in the world rankings and collected a paycheck of $1.98 million.[39]
Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]
Rahm won the Ben Hogan Award in 2015 and 2016, the first player to win it twice.[5] He was also the leading individual at the 2014 Eisenhower Trophy.[6] He competed in the 2015 Phoenix Open as an amateur during his junior year, finishing tied for fifth place, three shots behind the winner.[7] On 1 April 2015, Rahm became the 28th player to be the No. 1-ranked golfer in the World Amateur Golf Ranking. His first stint was for 25 consecutive weeks, after which he surrendered it, regained it, and held it for an additional 35 weeks. His total of 60 weeks spent atop the ranking is the all-time record. While ranked No. 1 in the world, he advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2015 U.S. Amateur before losing to Derek Bard.[8]
Schauffele joined the 2018 European Tour as an associate member. With his win at the 2018 WGC-HSBC Champions, Schauffele rose in the European Tour's Order of Merit, the year long points race dubbed the European Tour Race to Dubai, to 4th position.[20] Schauffele entered the European Tour final event, the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, in 5th position. With a final round score of 6-under-par 66, which equaled the lowest score of the day, Schauffele finished T16. This ensured a season-ending 4th position on the Order of Merit and participation in the 2018 European Tour's bonus pool.[21]

Categories: American male golfersAugusta Jaguars men's golfersPGA Tour golfersEuropean Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from TexasSportspeople from San AntonioSportspeople from Harris County, TexasPeople from Spring, Texas1990 birthsLiving people
Two of Schauffele's great-grandfathers played soccer at the European premier level. Johann Hoffmann played for his Austria national football team and won multiple Austrian (SK Rapid Wien), Bohemian (DSV Saaz), and French (FC Sochaux; Racing Straßburg) national titles. After playing football for VFB Stuttgart, Richard Schauffele excelled in track and field, garnering over 40 titles in discus, javelin and shot put for 2 clubs, the Stuttgarter Kickers and the Cannstatter Ruder-Club.
Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship: After finishes of second, third, T4, T5 (twice) and T6, finally broke through with a win at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship on the Tour's toughest course of the year. His winning score was 6-under 278, with the field's average score 1.59-over par. Trailed South Africa's Richard Sterne by three shots with four holes to play only to find himself in a playoff after Sterne bogeyed Nos. 15, 16 and 17. A wedge from 75 yards to three feet on the 18th hole at Ohio State University GC's Scarlet Course sealed the victory with both his parents and grandparents in his Sunday gallery. Became the fourth-youngest winner in Tour history, trailing only Jason Day, Patrick Cantlay and Danny Lee.
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