In his first full season on the PGA TOUR, recorded 11 top-10 finishes, second only to Jordan Spieth and Justin Thomas (12), and finished fifth in the FedExCup standings. Missed just two cuts in 23 starts. Earned his first career PGA TOUR title at the Farmers Insurance Open. Advanced through all four FedExCup Playoffs events, where he finished no worse than seventh in any of the events.
Born and raised in San Diego, California, Xander Schauffele fixed his sights on golf at the young age of 10. His father, a graduate of San Diego Golf Academy (now Golf Academy of America), encouraged his interest and to this day is his only swing coach. Schauffele played golf for Scripps Ranch High School, then Long Beach State University and San Diego State University. Among other early accolades, he won the individual title of the 2011 California State High School Championship and is the 2014 California State Amateur champion.
DEAN & DELUCA Invitational: The two-time Hogan Award winner (given annually onsite Monday of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational) trailed 54-hole leader Webb Simpson by four strokes at the start of the final round of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational. After a bogey on the par-4 third, made five birdies en route to a 4-under 66. Barely missed a 12'2" putt on the last for birdie to force a playoff with Kevin Kisner. Marked his seventh top-10 finish in 14 starts this season, with four inside the top three. Was looking to join fellow Spaniard Sergio Garcia on the list of players to win the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational in their first appearance.
Sentry Tournament of Champions: Defeated Patrick Reed and Xander Schauffele in a playoff to win the Sentry Tournament of Champions for the second time, earning his 12th PGA TOUR title at age 26 years, 251 days. Became the third player since 1960 to win 12 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods. Represented his third win in a six-start stretch on TOUR. Joined Stuart Appleby (3), Geoff Ogilvy (2) and Dustin Johnson (2) as players to win the event multiple times since it moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999. Led the field in Birdies (24) and Par-3 Scoring Average (2.75). Improved to 3-1 in his career in playoffs.

No. 11 at Albany is a par-5 that was reachable downwind the first two days of the event. When the win switched for Friday’s round, strategy switched with it, and golfers had to radically change lines to aim further left on the fairway. Reed was among those who ended up missing left of the fairway off the tee; he found himself in the waste area down the left side. Even without any human traffic, these can be treacherous places with inconvenient lies. But Reed had entered the day with a three-shot lead and was playing from the final pairing, which meant a day’s worth of extra imperfections in the wasteland bordering the fairway.
Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Teamed with Ryan Palmer to claim his third TOUR victory at the Zurich Classic on New Orleans. At 26-under 262, posted a three-stroke win over Sergio Garcia/Tommy Fleetwood. Team sat T17 after first-round 64 in Four-ball format but captured solo lead through 36 holes at 15-under following a 7-under 65 in Foursomes, the first score of 65 or lower at the event in that format. Went on to share the 54-hole lead with Scott Stallings/Trey Mullinax. Only previous appearance at the event before victory was a missed cut with Wesley Bryan in 2018.
PGA Championship: Angling to become just the second player to successfully defend a PGA Championship crown (Tiger Woods, 2000 and 2007), posted back-to-back 67s on the weekend at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. At 10-under 270, finished T6. Was tied for the lead at one point Sunday, before two bogeys on his last five holes resulted in the T6 showing. Had he won, he would have become the first player to win the week before winning a major championship title since Rory McIlroy in 2014 (WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, PGA Championship).
But then he stepped into the scoring area and stayed there for a number of minutes. Woodland emerged and headed to Golf Channel’s stand-up area to give post-round comments. Reed started to walk out of the scoring area but then was called back in by Slugger White. After another minute, he emerged. A PGA Tour staffer spoke to Reed, who said he would be declining to give an interview on Golf Channel or give official remarks to reporters at the podium. But as a group of reporters looked on, Reed motioned them over and said he was happy to discuss what had happened.
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).
In the following week's tournament, the Sony Open in Hawaii, Thomas became the seventh player in PGA Tour history to shoot a 59. During the first round, he opened his round with an eagle and needed to make an eagle on the ninth, his last hole of the day, to shoot 59.[11] He became the youngest player to shoot a sub-60 round. Thomas finished with rounds of 64, 65, and 65 to win the tournament by 7 strokes. He set tournament records for 18, 36, 54, and 72 holes (59, 123, 188, and 253, respectively). He set PGA Tour records at 36 and 72 holes and tied the 54-hole record.[12]
The Honda Classic: Won for the seventh time in his last 31 starts with his second win of the 2017-18 PGA TOUR Season via playoff at The Honda Classic. Defeated 54-hole leader Luke List with a birdie-4 on the first extra hole, improving his playoff record to 2-0. Reclaimed the No. 1 spot in the FedExCup for the first time since winning the 2016-17 FedExCup. Moved to No. 3 in the Official World Golf Ranking, the highest position of his career to date. Became the second multiple-season winner, joining Patton Kizzire.

The Barclays: Held share of 18-hole lead, plus solo 36-hole lead, before entering final round of The Barclays one stroke behind 54-hole leader Rickie Fowler. Playing in the final pairing in the final round with Fowler, was tied with nine holes to play before Fowler bogeyed No. 11. Doubled his lead over Fowler with birdie at No. 12. When Fowler dropped out of contention with a double bogey at No. 16, all he needed was a bogey on the final hole to win by a stroke over Sean O'Hair and Emiliano Grillo, both already in the clubhouse. A plugged lie in a fairway bunker led to a forced lay-up and an eventual two-putt bogey for a 1-under 71 and a one-stroke victory. Earned his fifth TOUR title at age 26, joining Jordan Spieth (21) and Rory McIlroy (23) as youngest winners with five TOUR titles in last 10 years. At No. 7 in the FedExCup standings, entered the FedExCup Playoffs as the highest-ranked player without a win. The Barclays marked his second come-from-behind win, a feat he also achieved at the 2015 Hyundai Tournament of Champions. It was also the third time he went on to win after holding the solo 36-hole lead.
PGA Championship: At 6-under 278, finished T2 and two strokes behind Justin Thomas at the PGA Championship, marking his first top-10 finish in 16 major championship starts. Had finished T12 at the 2016 Open Championship for his previous-best outing in a major. With his solid play at Quail Hollow, moved from No. 11 to No. 9 in the U.S. Presidents Cup standings. Entered the 72nd hold at 7-under-par and hoping to put some pressure on leader Justin Thomas (who was playing the 17th hole at the time), but a bogey on the par-4 18th hole dropped him to 6-under and an eventual three-way tie for second.
Valero Texas Open: Back in Texas three weeks later, birdied the par-5 72nd hole at the Valero Texas Open to tie the lead at 11-under with Charley Hoffman, playing in the same group. When Hoffman sank a clutch birdie putt for the win, Reed finished alone in second place. Opened with a 7-under 65 to sit just one back of Brendan Steele's 18-hole lead. The finish marked his second runner-up of the 2015-16 season and his eighth top-10 finish in 13 starts.
Golf Channel’s cameras moved in, too, but hardly got the shot they wanted: Reed was still dripping sweat from a sweltering day in the Bahamas sun and he was severely backlit. The look did Reed no favors with viewers at home. In person, he was composed and had a clear story for his version of what had happened. He had been in an elongated depression, maybe a footprint, and the sand he’d cleared hadn’t actually been in his path. A different camera angle, he said, would have shown something different.

Valero Texas Open: Back in Texas three weeks later, birdied the par-5 72nd hole at the Valero Texas Open to tie the lead at 11-under with Charley Hoffman, playing in the same group. When Hoffman sank a clutch birdie putt for the win, Reed finished alone in second place. Opened with a 7-under 65 to sit just one back of Brendan Steele's 18-hole lead. The finish marked his second runner-up of the 2015-16 season and his eighth top-10 finish in 13 starts.


World Golf Championships-Dell Match Play: Advanced out of group play at the World Golf Championships-Dell Match Play with wins over Daniel Berger (1-up), Matthew Fitzpatrick (4 and 3) and Phil Mickelson (5 and 4) before losing to Dustin Johnson (3 and 2) in the round of 16 for a T9 result. In his match against Mickelson, he made two eagles, along with three birdies, and was 7-up through 10 holes before winning, 5 and 4.
The Barclays: Held share of 18-hole lead, plus solo 36-hole lead, before entering final round of The Barclays one stroke behind 54-hole leader Rickie Fowler. Playing in the final pairing in the final round with Fowler, was tied with nine holes to play before Fowler bogeyed No. 11. Doubled his lead over Fowler with birdie at No. 12. When Fowler dropped out of contention with a double bogey at No. 16, all he needed was a bogey on the final hole to win by a stroke over Sean O'Hair and Emiliano Grillo, both already in the clubhouse. A plugged lie in a fairway bunker led to a forced lay-up and an eventual two-putt bogey for a 1-under 71 and a one-stroke victory. Earned his fifth TOUR title at age 26, joining Jordan Spieth (21) and Rory McIlroy (23) as youngest winners with five TOUR titles in last 10 years. At No. 7 in the FedExCup standings, entered the FedExCup Playoffs as the highest-ranked player without a win. The Barclays marked his second come-from-behind win, a feat he also achieved at the 2015 Hyundai Tournament of Champions. It was also the third time he went on to win after holding the solo 36-hole lead.
In early August 2019, Schauffele placed 4th in the inaugural 2019 Wyndham Rewards Top 10,[27] thus entering the 2019 Playoffs in 4th position in the FedEx Cup rankings. In accordance with the new 2019 playoff format, Schauffele found himself in 8th position after the first two of a total of three playoff events and arrived at East Lake Golf Club for the playing of the 2019 Tour Championship with a 6 shot deficit to initially #1 positioned Justin Thomas. Schauffele was able to erase the deficit after the very first round with a score of 6-under-par 64 and was tied for the lead going into Friday.[28]On Sunday August 25, Schauffele finished out the season with a solo second place at the 2019 Tour Championship, which also placed him in a solo second position in the 2019 FedEx Cup – his highest finish to date.[29]
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