Thomas comes from a long line of professional golfers. His father (who is also his swing coach) served as Head Professional at the Harmony Landing Country Club in Goshen, Kentucky, while his grandfather was a 60-year veteran of the PGA Tour who played in the 1962 U.S. Open. Thomas’s golfing skills were evident early on. Prior to his junior year in high school, in 2009, he amazingly finished third in a PGA Tour event, the Wyndham Championship, where at the age of just 16 years, 3 months, and 23 days he became just the third youngest player in history to make the cut on the PGA Tour. In 2012, while at the University of Alabama, he won both the Haskins and the Nicklaus awards, given annually to the country’s top collegiate golfer, and he turned professional the following year at age 20. He won his first tournament on the Web.com tour in 2014 and registered his first PGA victory at CIMB Classic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2016.
On April 14, Schauffele tied for second in the Masters Tournament, one stroke behind champion Tiger Woods. After opening with a 1-over 73, recorded rounds of 65-70-68 to finish T2 at the Masters Tournament with Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka. Schauffele's finish at the Masters Tournament represented his third top-five in eight starts at major championships (T5 at 2017 U.S. Open, T2 at 2018 Open Championship, T2 at 2019 Masters Tournament). He led the field with 25 birdies, becoming the third player since 1980 to have 25 or more birdies in a single Masters, joining Phil Mickelson (25 in 2001) and Jordan Spieth (28 in 2015).[25]
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Seized the 54-hole lead at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship by one stroke after rounds of 69-66-66, but faltered on Sunday with a 1-over 72 to finish three back of winner Dustin Johnson. Highlight in round three was a hole-in-one with a 6-iron at the 232-yard, par-3 13th hole. It marked his second ace on the PGA TOUR, following his first at The Greenbrier Classic in 2015.
But then he stepped into the scoring area and stayed there for a number of minutes. Woodland emerged and headed to Golf Channel’s stand-up area to give post-round comments. Reed started to walk out of the scoring area but then was called back in by Slugger White. After another minute, he emerged. A PGA Tour staffer spoke to Reed, who said he would be declining to give an interview on Golf Channel or give official remarks to reporters at the podium. But as a group of reporters looked on, Reed motioned them over and said he was happy to discuss what had happened.
Valspar Championship: At the Valspar Championship, nearly became the season's first multiple winner. Began the final round at the Copperhead Course at 5-under 208, four strokes off 54-hole leader Ryan Moore. Sank a clutch, 31-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole, good for a bogey-free, 5-under 66 and spot in a playoff with Jordan Spieth and 2008 Valspar Championship winner Sean O'Hair. Following solid ups and-downs on the first two extra holes to save par and remain in the playoff, fell victim, with O'Hair, to Spieth's birdie putt on the third extra hole, No. 17. Two years earlier, defeated Spieth in sudden death at the Wyndham Championship en route to his first career PGA TOUR win.
In the end, Reed took a two-stroke penalty for a triple-bogey 8 on No. 11. He slipped to solo 6th place at 10 under. That’s where he’ll begin Saturday’s final round, three shots back of Woodland’s lead, playing alongside Jon Rahm. He could still win the event — but no matter what happens Saturday, there’s no question he’d like to take back two very costly practice swings.
Dell Technologies Championship: After opening the Dell Technologies Championship with an even-par 71, closed with rounds of 67-69-66 to finish T6 and six strokes behind champion Justin Thomas. Has now finished inside the top six in his last three starts at TPC Boston (T4-2015, T5-2016, T6-2017). With his fourth top-10 finish of the season, moved to No. 22 in the FedExCup standings.
Schauffele was the only golfer to publicly announce that his driver had failed a test earlier in the week. He also said that he made his displeasure known afterwards with The R&A. “I had a word with them and hopefully they take my comments seriously and my concerns, just because it wasn’t my plan to show up Monday morning of a major or Tuesday — sorry, it was Tuesday evening — where I was doing driver testing here. It’s not really what players want to be doing.”
BMW Masters: Finished second to Kristoffer Broberg in a sudden-death playoff at the BMW Masters in Shanghai. Opened with rounds of 71-69-64 and took a one-shot lead on the back nine on Sunday with an eagle out of a bunker on No. 15 followed by a birdie on No. 16. After a bogey on No. 17, finished with a par for a final-round 71 and a 271 total to match Broberg. In the playoff, the Swede drained a 15-foot birdie putt on the first extra hole to claim his first European Tour title.
U.S. Open: Became the fifth player in U.S. Open history to record a round of 63 in the championship, with a 9-under at the par-72 Erin Hills course, marking the 31st 63 recorded in major championship history. Posted a 3-over 75 in the final round to finish T9, becoming one of 16 players who followed a major championship 63 with an over-par round. Also become the fourth of five players who recorded 63 in a U.S. Open to produce an over-par round to follow (Vijay Singh/2003/72, Jack Nicklaus/1980/71, Tom Weiskopf/1980/75, Johnny Miller/1973/final-round). T9 was his first top-10 result in a major championship in his eighth major start.
Earned 2017 PGA TOUR Player of the Year honors, as voted on by the TOUR's membership, after capturing the FedExCup following a five-win season that included his first major championship victory at the PGA Championship. Other victories came at the CIMB Classic, SBS Tournament of Champions, Sony Open in Hawaii and Dell Technologies Championship. Joined Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth as the only players since 1960 to capture five wins in a season, including a major, before the age of 25. Became the seventh player on TOUR to shoot a 59. In 25 starts, tallied a TOUR-best 12 top-10 finishes (tied with Spieth) with 19 made cuts. Also took home the Arnold Palmer Award as the TOUR's leading money-winner ($9,921,560) and finished third in Adjusted Scoring Average (69.359). Capped off the season by helping lead the United States to an eight-point victory over the International Team at the Presidents Cup.

He began his college career at Long Beach State University under then coach Ryan Ressa. There, Xander garnered Big West Conference Freshman of the Year and First Team All-Big West awards in 2012.. For his sophomore year Xander transferred to San Diego State University to play for the SDSU Aztecs,  where he still holds several seasonal and career records.. After graduating with a degree in Social Sciences in 2015, Xander played Web,com Q-School that same fall.  There he succeeded in securing playing privileges for the 2016 Web.com Tour season.Read More Show Less
Golf Channel’s cameras moved in, too, but hardly got the shot they wanted: Reed was still dripping sweat from a sweltering day in the Bahamas sun and he was severely backlit. The look did Reed no favors with viewers at home. In person, he was composed and had a clear story for his version of what had happened. He had been in an elongated depression, maybe a footprint, and the sand he’d cleared hadn’t actually been in his path. A different camera angle, he said, would have shown something different.
BMW Masters: Finished second to Kristoffer Broberg in a sudden-death playoff at the BMW Masters in Shanghai. Opened with rounds of 71-69-64 and took a one-shot lead on the back nine on Sunday with an eagle out of a bunker on No. 15 followed by a birdie on No. 16. After a bogey on No. 17, finished with a par for a final-round 71 and a 271 total to match Broberg. In the playoff, the Swede drained a 15-foot birdie putt on the first extra hole to claim his first European Tour title.

Sony Open in Hawaii: Opened the Sony Open in Hawaii with an 11-under 59, becoming the youngest player to record a sub-60 round on the PGA TOUR (23 years, 8 months, 14 days). Added rounds of 64-65-65 for a runaway seven-stroke victory over Justin Rose, earning his fourth PGA TOUR victory (third of the season) in his 74th start at the age of 23 years, 8 months and 17 days. With a 72-hole total of 253, established a PGA TOUR record, eclipsing Tommy Armour III at the 2003 Valero Texas Open (254). History-making week included lowest opening 54-hole score (188; tied with Steve Stricker) and lowest opening 36-hole score (123). With the victory, became the fourth player to win the Sony Open in wire-to-wire fashion (no ties), joining K.J. Choi (2008), Paul Azinger (2000) and Howard Twitty (1993). Became the first player to win the SBS Tournament of Champions and Sony Open in Hawaii in the same season since Ernie Els in 2003, and the 10th to win both Hawaii events at least once during a career.
Categories: American male golfersAlabama Crimson Tide men's golfersPGA Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesKorn Ferry Tour graduatesGolfers from KentuckySt. Xavier High School (Louisville) alumniSportspeople from Louisville, KentuckyPeople from Oldham County, Kentucky1993 birthsLiving people
AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Making his first-ever start at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, followed an opening-round 73 at Spyglass Hill with rounds of 67-67-68 to jump to a T5 finish, seven strokes behind champion Jordan Spieth. Week included a second-round 5-under 67 at Pebble Beach GL, including six consecutive birdies on Nos. 2-7. Played his final 63 holes with just two over-par scores (No. 14 in round two and No. 3 in round four (both at Pebble Beach GL).

Earned 2017 PGA TOUR Player of the Year honors, as voted on by the TOUR's membership, after capturing the FedExCup following a five-win season that included his first major championship victory at the PGA Championship. Other victories came at the CIMB Classic, SBS Tournament of Champions, Sony Open in Hawaii and Dell Technologies Championship. Joined Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth as the only players since 1960 to capture five wins in a season, including a major, before the age of 25. Became the seventh player on TOUR to shoot a 59. In 25 starts, tallied a TOUR-best 12 top-10 finishes (tied with Spieth) with 19 made cuts. Also took home the Arnold Palmer Award as the TOUR's leading money-winner ($9,921,560) and finished third in Adjusted Scoring Average (69.359). Capped off the season by helping lead the United States to an eight-point victory over the International Team at the Presidents Cup.

World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: Advanced to the final in his first appearance at World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play where he lost to Dustin Johnson on the final hole. Was 1-down standing on 18 tee with the honor before hitting tee shot 382 yards over the green. A poor chip and two putts led to a halved hole and handshake with Johnson, who made a regulation par. Was seeking his second TOUR win in 21st career start which would have matched Tiger Woods' achievement. Was the first player from Spain to reach the final. 7-and-5 win over Soren Kjeldsen in quarterfinal matched Daniel Berger's 7-and-5 win over J.B. Holmes in round one as largest winning margin of the week.
On April 14, Schauffele tied for second in the Masters Tournament, one stroke behind champion Tiger Woods. After opening with a 1-over 73, recorded rounds of 65-70-68 to finish T2 at the Masters Tournament with Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka. Schauffele's finish at the Masters Tournament represented his third top-five in eight starts at major championships (T5 at 2017 U.S. Open, T2 at 2018 Open Championship, T2 at 2019 Masters Tournament). He led the field with 25 birdies, becoming the third player since 1980 to have 25 or more birdies in a single Masters, joining Phil Mickelson (25 in 2001) and Jordan Spieth (28 in 2015).[25]
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