THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES: Won for the 11th time on the PGA TOUR, winning THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES by two shots over Danny Lee. Earned second victory at the event and fourth in Asia since the start of the 2015-16 season (2015 CIMB Classic, 2016 CIMB Classic, 2017 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, 2019 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES). Became the fifth player to win 11 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth. Made 27 birdies, most in the field. Played the par-4s in 13-under, five shots better than anyone else in the field. Converted the 54-hole lead/co-lead to victory for the eighth time in his 11th attempt. Marked fourth straight top-five on the PGA TOUR, reaching that mark for the first time in his career.
Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
DEAN & DELUCA Invitational: The two-time Hogan Award winner (given annually onsite Monday of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational) trailed 54-hole leader Webb Simpson by four strokes at the start of the final round of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational. After a bogey on the par-4 third, made five birdies en route to a 4-under 66. Barely missed a 12'2" putt on the last for birdie to force a playoff with Kevin Kisner. Marked his seventh top-10 finish in 14 starts this season, with four inside the top three. Was looking to join fellow Spaniard Sergio Garcia on the list of players to win the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational in their first appearance.
Xander Schauffele is the PGA TOUR’s newest winner. The 23 year-old captured his first victory on tour at The Greenbrier Classic following rounds of 64, 69, 66 and 67, which is good news for all the neutrals out there. Xander isn’t just an exciting young talent, he’s also a genuinely fascinating guy that we’re hoping sticks around for years to come…
World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational: Finished T4 at the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational to record his second top-10 in just his third start in a World Golf Championships event, all coming this season. Notched his first top-10 of the season that did not result in a victory. His other two top-10s were both wins, at the Humana Challenge and the Cadillac Championship.
After the event, Reed was enveloped in controversy. Late on Sunday September 30, 2018, Karen Crouse of The New York Times published an article with quotes from Reed. In the article, Reed questioned Jordan Spieth and U.S. captain Jim Furyk about the breakup of the previously successful Reed-Spieth Ryder Cup pairing. Reed was quoted as saying "The issue's obviously with Jordan not wanting to play with me . . . I don’t have any issue with Jordan. When it comes right down to it, I don't care if I like the person I'm paired with or if the person likes me as long as it works and it sets up the team for success." Reed also described the Ryder Cup pairing decision-making process as "a buddy system" that ignores the input of all but a few select players. Reed also made it clear to Crouse that he lobbied Furyk to keep playing with Spieth, his "first choice." He expected it and was blindsided when he found out Spieth was playing with Justin Thomas.[40]
THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES: Won for the 11th time on the PGA TOUR, winning THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES by two shots over Danny Lee. Earned second victory at the event and fourth in Asia since the start of the 2015-16 season (2015 CIMB Classic, 2016 CIMB Classic, 2017 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, 2019 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES). Became the fifth player to win 11 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth. Made 27 birdies, most in the field. Played the par-4s in 13-under, five shots better than anyone else in the field. Converted the 54-hole lead/co-lead to victory for the eighth time in his 11th attempt. Marked fourth straight top-five on the PGA TOUR, reaching that mark for the first time in his career.
AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Making his first-ever start at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, followed an opening-round 73 at Spyglass Hill with rounds of 67-67-68 to jump to a T5 finish, seven strokes behind champion Jordan Spieth. Week included a second-round 5-under 67 at Pebble Beach GL, including six consecutive birdies on Nos. 2-7. Played his final 63 holes with just two over-par scores (No. 14 in round two and No. 3 in round four (both at Pebble Beach GL).
Masters Tournament: Shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 15-under 273 total to win the Masters Tournament by one stroke over Rickie Fowler. Claimed his sixth PGA TOUR title, and first major championship, in his 166th TOUR start at the age of 27 years, 8 months, 3 days. Marked his sixth time holding the 54-hole lead/co-lead on the PGA TOUR and fourth victory in that scenario. Was his first 54-hole lead in a major championship. Was 13-under on the par-5s for the week, two off the tournament record. Win marked his fourth top-10 in a row on TOUR, a first in his career. Became the fourth consecutive first-time major championship winner at the Masters, following Sergio Garcia (2017), Danny Willett (2016) and Jordan Spieth (2015).
Valero Texas Open: Back in Texas three weeks later, birdied the par-5 72nd hole at the Valero Texas Open to tie the lead at 11-under with Charley Hoffman, playing in the same group. When Hoffman sank a clutch birdie putt for the win, Reed finished alone in second place. Opened with a 7-under 65 to sit just one back of Brendan Steele's 18-hole lead. The finish marked his second runner-up of the 2015-16 season and his eighth top-10 finish in 13 starts.
Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament: Advanced to Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament Finals by finishing T5 at the second-stage qualifier at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. At Q-School Finals in December, opened with a 67 then slipped to 73-78 in the second and third of six rounds. Rebounded with a 69 the fourth day before firing the third-best set of scores over the last two days, 66-65, which secured him solid eligibility status for the 2014 season.
Schauffele, who is known exclusively as Xander Schauffele in the golfing world, was born in San Diego, California to a German/French naturalized immigrant father and a Taiwanese naturalized immigrant mother. Schauffele's father has been his only swing coach throughout his golfing career.[2] The Schauffele teaching philosophy relies heavily on basic ball flight laws and golf club mechanics – as a result Schauffele had not seen his own swing until about age 18.[3]

Thomas had another chance to claim the top spot in the world later on in March at the WGC-Match Play, but he was beaten 3 & 2 by Bubba Watson in the semi-finals. He then went on to lose the consolation match 5 & 3 to Alexander Norén to finish in fourth place. The result extended his lead at the top of the FedEx Cup standings and reduced the gap on the world number one, Dustin Johnson.

DEAN & DELUCA Invitational: The two-time Hogan Award winner (given annually onsite Monday of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational) trailed 54-hole leader Webb Simpson by four strokes at the start of the final round of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational. After a bogey on the par-4 third, made five birdies en route to a 4-under 66. Barely missed a 12'2" putt on the last for birdie to force a playoff with Kevin Kisner. Marked his seventh top-10 finish in 14 starts this season, with four inside the top three. Was looking to join fellow Spaniard Sergio Garcia on the list of players to win the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational in their first appearance.
×