Schauffele made his PGA Tour debut at the CareerBuilder Challenge in La Quinta, California. In his first round at the 2017 U.S. Open held at Erin Hills, Schauffele recorded a bogey free 6-under-par 66. This marked the first time in U.S. Open history for a player to shoot a bogey-free round of 66 or better in his national championship debut.[11] Furthermore, Schauffele is one of only 15 players to ever reach 10 under par at a U.S. Open.[12] After his opening 66, he shot rounds of 73-70-69 to finish in a tie for fifth place, earning him an exemption into the 2018 U.S. Open.
Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship: After finishes of second, third, T4, T5 (twice) and T6, finally broke through with a win at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship on the Tour's toughest course of the year. His winning score was 6-under 278, with the field's average score 1.59-over par. Trailed South Africa's Richard Sterne by three shots with four holes to play only to find himself in a playoff after Sterne bogeyed Nos. 15, 16 and 17. A wedge from 75 yards to three feet on the 18th hole at Ohio State University GC's Scarlet Course sealed the victory with both his parents and grandparents in his Sunday gallery. Became the fourth-youngest winner in Tour history, trailing only Jason Day, Patrick Cantlay and Danny Lee. 

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Sony Open in Hawaii: Opened the Sony Open in Hawaii with an 11-under 59, becoming the youngest player to record a sub-60 round on the PGA TOUR (23 years, 8 months, 14 days). Added rounds of 64-65-65 for a runaway seven-stroke victory over Justin Rose, earning his fourth PGA TOUR victory (third of the season) in his 74th start at the age of 23 years, 8 months and 17 days. With a 72-hole total of 253, established a PGA TOUR record, eclipsing Tommy Armour III at the 2003 Valero Texas Open (254). History-making week included lowest opening 54-hole score (188; tied with Steve Stricker) and lowest opening 36-hole score (123). With the victory, became the fourth player to win the Sony Open in wire-to-wire fashion (no ties), joining K.J. Choi (2008), Paul Azinger (2000) and Howard Twitty (1993). Became the first player to win the SBS Tournament of Champions and Sony Open in Hawaii in the same season since Ernie Els in 2003, and the 10th to win both Hawaii events at least once during a career.
Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship: After finishes of second, third, T4, T5 (twice) and T6, finally broke through with a win at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship on the Tour's toughest course of the year. His winning score was 6-under 278, with the field's average score 1.59-over par. Trailed South Africa's Richard Sterne by three shots with four holes to play only to find himself in a playoff after Sterne bogeyed Nos. 15, 16 and 17. A wedge from 75 yards to three feet on the 18th hole at Ohio State University GC's Scarlet Course sealed the victory with both his parents and grandparents in his Sunday gallery. Became the fourth-youngest winner in Tour history, trailing only Jason Day, Patrick Cantlay and Danny Lee.
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Lost to Phil Mickelson with a bogey on the first playoff hole at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship. Sat 11 strokes back after 36 holes before firing a course-record 62 in round three at Club de Golf Chapultepec to pull within four of the lead, then a final-round 64 that was capped by a 119-yard hole-out from the 18th fairway to post 16-under. His weekend score of 16-under 126 matched the best 36-hole score (any rounds) in the WGC-Mexico Championship. Became the first player since Russell Knox in 2015-16 (Won/WGC-HSBC Champions, P2/OHL Classic at Mayakoba) to win one week and lose in a playoff the next.
In the end, Reed took a two-stroke penalty for a triple-bogey 8 on No. 11. He slipped to solo 6th place at 10 under. That’s where he’ll begin Saturday’s final round, three shots back of Woodland’s lead, playing alongside Jon Rahm. He could still win the event — but no matter what happens Saturday, there’s no question he’d like to take back two very costly practice swings.

Schauffele joined the 2018 European Tour as an associate member. With his win at the 2018 WGC-HSBC Champions, Schauffele rose in the European Tour's Order of Merit, the year long points race dubbed the European Tour Race to Dubai, to 4th position.[20] Schauffele entered the European Tour final event, the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, in 5th position. With a final round score of 6-under-par 66, which equaled the lowest score of the day, Schauffele finished T16. This ensured a season-ending 4th position on the Order of Merit and participation in the 2018 European Tour's bonus pool.[21]


Schauffele began the 2017 FedEx Cup Playoffs 33rd in the standings. Entering the third and penultimate leg of the playoffs, the 2017 BMW Championship, he was 32nd, needing to move up at least two spots to advance to the 2017 Tour Championship. Schauffele played the final six holes of the tournament in 6-under-par with a birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie-par-birdie finish and rose to 26th.[13]
Successfully Monday-qualified for six PGA TOUR events and played in 12 tournaments, making the cut in seven of the 12 tournaments and recording four top-25 finishes. Monday qualified for the Zurich Classic of New Orleans (T24), Wells Fargo Championship (T32), HP Byron Nelson Championship (missed cut), Travelers Championship (T47), True South Classic (T21) and Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Classic (T22). He's also competed in the Valero Texas Open (T35), FedEx St.Jude Classic (missed cut), John Deere Classic (missed cut), Reno-Tahoe Open (missed cut), Frys.com Open (T11) and Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Classic on sponsors' exemptions. Also played two events on the Adams Tour and one Korn Ferry Tour event.

CareerBuilder Challenge: In first career playoff on the PGA TOUR at the CareerBuilder Challenge, defeated Andrew Landry with a birdie on the fourth extra hole (18th hole) to capture second career victory on TOUR. Moved to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings and No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking with the win. Became the second-youngest winner of the event at 23 years, 2 months, 11 days, behind only Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days). Shot an opening-round 62 at La Quinta Country Club. Was bogey-free in the final round en route to a 5-under 67.
Presidents Cup: Making his Presidents Cup debut, went 3-1-1 for the United States en route to a 19-11 victory over the International Team at Liberty National. Teamed with Rickie Fowler three times en route to two victories and a halve and then with Daniel Berger for a 3-and-2 victory over Jhonattan Vegas and Hideki Matsuyama in the Saturday afternoon Four-ball session.

Valspar Championship: At the Valspar Championship, nearly became the season's first multiple winner. Began the final round at the Copperhead Course at 5-under 208, four strokes off 54-hole leader Ryan Moore. Sank a clutch, 31-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole, good for a bogey-free, 5-under 66 and spot in a playoff with Jordan Spieth and 2008 Valspar Championship winner Sean O'Hair. Following solid ups and-downs on the first two extra holes to save par and remain in the playoff, fell victim, with O'Hair, to Spieth's birdie putt on the third extra hole, No. 17. Two years earlier, defeated Spieth in sudden death at the Wyndham Championship en route to his first career PGA TOUR win.

Patrick Nathaniel Reed (born August 5, 1990) is an American professional golfer who plays on the PGA Tour and the European Tour. He is notable for his victories in the 2018 Masters Tournament and the 2014 WGC-Cadillac Championship. He has represented the United States in Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup competitions. Because of his success in representing the United States in these team events, he has earned the nickname "Captain America".[3]
Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]

Masters Tournament: Finished fourth in the Masters Tournament at 11-under after a final-round 3-under 69. Advanced to the weekend in a major championship for the sixth time in seven starts. After hitting just 20 of 36 greens in regulation in the first 36 holes, hit 29 of 36 on the weekend at Augusta National and avoided three-putting for 72 holes. With third-round 65, was one of just four players to post a bogey-free round during the week, with each coming in round three (Jon Rahm/65, Rory McIlroy/65, Rickie Fowler/65, Si Woo Kim/68).

Sentry Tournament of Champions: Lost to Justin Thomas in a three-hole playoff at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, falling to 2-2 for his career in playoffs. Marked his sixth career runner-up on TOUR and first since the 2018 Valspar Championship. Became the first player since the tournament moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999 with 100 putts or fewer in a single year (99). One-Putt Percentage of 62.50 percent was the best on TOUR since Bud Cauley at the 2018 RBC Heritage (65.28%).
Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament: Advanced to Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament Finals by finishing T5 at the second-stage qualifier at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. At Q-School Finals in December, opened with a 67 then slipped to 73-78 in the second and third of six rounds. Rebounded with a 69 the fourth day before firing the third-best set of scores over the last two days, 66-65, which secured him solid eligibility status for the 2014 season.

Masters Tournament: Shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 15-under 273 total to win the Masters Tournament by one stroke over Rickie Fowler. Claimed his sixth PGA TOUR title, and first major championship, in his 166th TOUR start at the age of 27 years, 8 months, 3 days. Marked his sixth time holding the 54-hole lead/co-lead on the PGA TOUR and fourth victory in that scenario. Was his first 54-hole lead in a major championship. Was 13-under on the par-5s for the week, two off the tournament record. Win marked his fourth top-10 in a row on TOUR, a first in his career. Became the fourth consecutive first-time major championship winner at the Masters, following Sergio Garcia (2017), Danny Willett (2016) and Jordan Spieth (2015).

On July 16, 2019, at the 2019 Open Championship, the R&A found Schauffele's driver failed to meet CT test requirements. Schauffele was forced to scramble for a replacement driver. The R&A made 30 random inspections of players' clubs and Schauffele's driver was found to be one of four drivers of the 30 strong sample not to comply with the CT test requirements. The manufacturers brands that had drivers fail the CT test are: Callaway, Ping, Taylormade. It also has become public knowledge, that during a testing in May 2019 at the Diamond Cup Golf event on the Japan Golf Tour, some 15 drivers in the field had failed the very same CT test requirements. Rumors, that Schauffele's driver was the only one and additionally the first one ever to fail the R&A's CT test were proven unfounded and false.[31][32][33]
Safeway Open: In the season-opening Safeway Open, overcame a 3-over 75 in round one with scores of 66-66-67 to finish T8 with four others at 14-under 274. Marked his second consecutive top-10 in the event having finished T3 in 2015. Before play began, announced that he would be donating $250 for every birdie or eagle made in his first three events of the 2016-17 PGA TOUR season to Convoy of Hope, a disaster-response, non-profit organization providing aid to those impacted by Hurricane Matthew which brought devastation to Haiti, the Bahamas and the southeastern United States. At the Safeway Open, made 23 birdies and one eagle, totaling $6,000 in donations.
In his second WGC event, the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Rahm was runner-up to Dustin Johnson in the championship match.[16] Rahm debuted as the No. 21-seed in the field of 64 and went 3−0 in round-robin play, defeating Kevin Chappell 3 & 2, Shane Lowry 2 & 1, and countryman Sergio García 6 & 4. He continued his domination in the round of 16 with a second consecutive 6 & 4 win over Charles Howell III, and then bested that mark when he eliminated Søren Kjeldsen 7 & 5 in the quarterfinals. In the semifinals, he defeated Bill Haas 3 & 2, which set up his rematch with Johnson, who was attempting to win his third straight tournament. In the final, Rahm was 5-down after just 8 holes, but won holes 9, 10, 13, 15, and 16 to get to only 1-down going into the 18th. Both players made par on the final hole of the match and Rahm finished runner-up in his WGC-Match Play debut, which allowed him to ascend to a new career-high world ranking of 14th.
PGA Championship: With a final-round 3-under 68 (including six birdies and three bogeys) leading to a 72-hole score of 8-under 276, finished two strokes clear of Francesco Molinari, Patrick Reed and Louis Oosthuizen to win his first major championship title (in 10 major starts) at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club. While his round included multiple highlights – including a 36-foot birdie putt on No. 9, a 40-foot chip in for birdie on No. 13 and a perfectly struck 7 iron from 221 yards to 15 feet for birdie on the par-3 17th hole – it was the 10th hole that will be the most memorable moment of his victory. His eight-foot birdie putt on the 10th hole somehow failed to go in, hanging on the lip for 12 seconds before finally falling in. Won for the fifth time on the PGA TOUR, with four of those victories coming during the 2016-17 season. Coupled with Jordan Spieth's victory at The Open Championship, marked the first time since 1923 (Bobby Jones/U.S. Open, Gene Sarazen/PGA Championship) that different players aged 25 or younger won in back-to-back majors. The son of Mike and Jani Thomas, his victory marked the eighth time the son of a PGA of America Professional won the PGA Championship, most recently by Keegan Bradley in 2011. Winning in his 90th career start at the age of 24 years, 3 months and 15 days, notched the 26th win by a player in his 20s on TOUR during the season. Collected 600 points to move from No. 4 to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings. In addition, earned a five-year exemption on the PGA TOUR. Entered the final round trailing Kevin Kisner by two strokes, marking the 15th come-from-behind victory in the last 17 PGA TOUR events.
DP World Tour Championship Dubai: Carded a final-round 67 to win the European Tour's DP World Tour Championship in Dubai, where a late slip from Justin Rose handed Tommy Fleetwood the Race to Dubai title. Came home in 33 to get to 19-under and win his second Rolex Series title by one shot over Shane Lowry and Kiradech Aphibarnrat. Awarded the European Tour's Sir Henry Cotton Rookie of the Year award earlier in the week, added this win to his Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation title to become the first player to win multiple Rolex Series events.
Reed told Crouse "For somebody as successful in the Ryder Cup as I am, I don't think it's smart to sit me twice." Reed implied that Tiger Woods was his "second choice". He told Crouse that after he and Woods lost their first match against Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari, Woods apologized to Reed for letting him down. Reed said he told Woods, "We win together as a team and we lose together as a team." Reed told Crouse that "very day [in the team room], I saw 'Leave your egos at the door,'". Referring to the Europeans, he added, "They do that better than us." There has been concern expressed that Reed's public flaming of his teammates and captain will negatively impact on his ability to play on future Ryder Cup and President Cup teams.[40]
Rahm finished tied for 27th place in his first Masters and then finished 4th in the Wells Fargo Championship and joint runner-up in the Dean & DeLuca Invitational, results which lifted him into the top-10 of the World Rankings.[17][18][19] Making his debut in a European Tour event, he finished tied for 10th in the Open de France and, the following week, he earned his first European Tour victory by winning the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open by six strokes.[20]
But then he stepped into the scoring area and stayed there for a number of minutes. Woodland emerged and headed to Golf Channel’s stand-up area to give post-round comments. Reed started to walk out of the scoring area but then was called back in by Slugger White. After another minute, he emerged. A PGA Tour staffer spoke to Reed, who said he would be declining to give an interview on Golf Channel or give official remarks to reporters at the podium. But as a group of reporters looked on, Reed motioned them over and said he was happy to discuss what had happened.
Dubai Duty Free Irish Open: Earned his fourth European Tour title at the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open, winning the event for the second time in three years. Closed with an 8-under 62 at Lahinch Golf Club, which included an eagle, eight birdies and two bogeys. Started the final round five shots back of 54-hole leader Robert Rock en route to a two-shot victory.
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).

Sentry Tournament of Champions: Lost to Justin Thomas in a three-hole playoff at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, falling to 2-2 for his career in playoffs. Marked his sixth career runner-up on TOUR and first since the 2018 Valspar Championship. Became the first player since the tournament moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999 with 100 putts or fewer in a single year (99). One-Putt Percentage of 62.50 percent was the best on TOUR since Bud Cauley at the 2018 RBC Heritage (65.28%).
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