Season highlighted by his first major championship title and sixth career PGA TOUR win. Made 20 cuts in 26 starts with seven top-10s among 12 top-25s. Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the sixth consecutive season and the TOUR Championship for the fifth time in a row. Ended the season at No. 22 in the FedExCup following a 28th-place result at the TOUR Championship. Earned a spot on the U.S. Ryder Cup team for the third consecutive time.
Reed has had a number of public disputes since coming on the PGA Tour, too: His criticism of Ryder Cup captain Jim Furyk. His complaint about comped seats at Fenway Park. His assertion that Jordan Spieth would have gotten a better drop. His showdown with a noisy camera crew. Reed is pleasant and jovial in day-to-day interactions, but these moments stick out in a sport where it’s easy to stick out.
Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
Masters Tournament: Finished fourth in the Masters Tournament at 11-under after a final-round 3-under 69. Advanced to the weekend in a major championship for the sixth time in seven starts. After hitting just 20 of 36 greens in regulation in the first 36 holes, hit 29 of 36 on the weekend at Augusta National and avoided three-putting for 72 holes. With third-round 65, was one of just four players to post a bogey-free round during the week, with each coming in round three (Jon Rahm/65, Rory McIlroy/65, Rickie Fowler/65, Si Woo Kim/68).
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the second consecutive time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the first time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 12 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T6 at East Lake to end his season No. 12 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 10 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, five were top-five showings, including his maiden PGA TOUR victory at the CIMB Classic.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Seized the 54-hole lead at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship by one stroke after rounds of 69-66-66, but faltered on Sunday with a 1-over 72 to finish three back of winner Dustin Johnson. Highlight in round three was a hole-in-one with a 6-iron at the 232-yard, par-3 13th hole. It marked his second ace on the PGA TOUR, following his first at The Greenbrier Classic in 2015.

After the event, Reed was enveloped in controversy. Late on Sunday September 30, 2018, Karen Crouse of The New York Times published an article with quotes from Reed. In the article, Reed questioned Jordan Spieth and U.S. captain Jim Furyk about the breakup of the previously successful Reed-Spieth Ryder Cup pairing. Reed was quoted as saying "The issue's obviously with Jordan not wanting to play with me . . . I don’t have any issue with Jordan. When it comes right down to it, I don't care if I like the person I'm paired with or if the person likes me as long as it works and it sets up the team for success." Reed also described the Ryder Cup pairing decision-making process as "a buddy system" that ignores the input of all but a few select players. Reed also made it clear to Crouse that he lobbied Furyk to keep playing with Spieth, his "first choice." He expected it and was blindsided when he found out Spieth was playing with Justin Thomas.[40]
On April 14, Schauffele tied for second in the Masters Tournament, one stroke behind champion Tiger Woods. After opening with a 1-over 73, recorded rounds of 65-70-68 to finish T2 at the Masters Tournament with Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka. Schauffele's finish at the Masters Tournament represented his third top-five in eight starts at major championships (T5 at 2017 U.S. Open, T2 at 2018 Open Championship, T2 at 2019 Masters Tournament). He led the field with 25 birdies, becoming the third player since 1980 to have 25 or more birdies in a single Masters, joining Phil Mickelson (25 in 2001) and Jordan Spieth (28 in 2015).[25]
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