On April 14, Schauffele tied for second in the Masters Tournament, one stroke behind champion Tiger Woods. After opening with a 1-over 73, recorded rounds of 65-70-68 to finish T2 at the Masters Tournament with Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka. Schauffele's finish at the Masters Tournament represented his third top-five in eight starts at major championships (T5 at 2017 U.S. Open, T2 at 2018 Open Championship, T2 at 2019 Masters Tournament). He led the field with 25 birdies, becoming the third player since 1980 to have 25 or more birdies in a single Masters, joining Phil Mickelson (25 in 2001) and Jordan Spieth (28 in 2015).[25]
Successfully Monday-qualified for six PGA TOUR events and played in 12 tournaments, making the cut in seven of the 12 tournaments and recording four top-25 finishes. Monday qualified for the Zurich Classic of New Orleans (T24), Wells Fargo Championship (T32), HP Byron Nelson Championship (missed cut), Travelers Championship (T47), True South Classic (T21) and Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Classic (T22). He's also competed in the Valero Texas Open (T35), FedEx St.Jude Classic (missed cut), John Deere Classic (missed cut), Reno-Tahoe Open (missed cut), Frys.com Open (T11) and Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Classic on sponsors' exemptions. Also played two events on the Adams Tour and one Korn Ferry Tour event.
After the U.S. Open, Rahm turned professional, which meant that he forfeited his exemption into the 2016 Open Championship. The next week Rahm played in his first event as a pro at the Quicken Loans National. He held or shared the lead for the first two rounds and finished tied for third place, four strokes behind the winner, Billy Hurley III.[11] The finish was enough for Rahm to regain entry into The Open, as the Quicken Loans National was part of the Open Qualifying Series. Rahm finished tied runner-up in the RBC Canadian Open, securing Special Temporary Member status for the remainder of the season.[12] He gained enough points as a non-member to earn a PGA Tour card for 2017.
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Following major earthquakes that hit Mexico City less then six months earlier, pledged to donate $1,000 for every birdie and $3,000 for every eagle he made during the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship, where he finished T20. Funds were distributed to the Mexican Red Cross to assist with earthquake relief for people in need. Made 21 birdies for the week and contributed $21,000 to the fund. His sponsors stepped in to match the contribution, making the final amount $63,000.

In February 2018, Thomas won for the eighth time on tour, claiming victory at the Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. He birdied the final hole of regulation play to make a playoff with Luke List. Then on the first extra hole, Thomas made birdie again on the same hole, after a 5-wood from the fairway. List could not hole his birdie putt, after the missing the green to the right, resulting in Thomas winning the tournament. The win lifted Thomas to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and number three in world rankings.[18]
“It wasn’t the most fun room to be in. But it is what it is, you know?” Schauffele said. “I have a legal driver now and I sort of put that one to rest, and happy to see that ball performing like it did today or the driver performing like it did today, so that was very comforting. Like I said, it will get better every day. We’ve still got two more.”
Reed told Crouse "For somebody as successful in the Ryder Cup as I am, I don't think it's smart to sit me twice." Reed implied that Tiger Woods was his "second choice". He told Crouse that after he and Woods lost their first match against Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari, Woods apologized to Reed for letting him down. Reed said he told Woods, "We win together as a team and we lose together as a team." Reed told Crouse that "very day [in the team room], I saw 'Leave your egos at the door,'". Referring to the Europeans, he added, "They do that better than us." There has been concern expressed that Reed's public flaming of his teammates and captain will negatively impact on his ability to play on future Ryder Cup and President Cup teams.[40]
Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]
Sentry Tournament of Champions: Lost to Justin Thomas in a three-hole playoff at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, falling to 2-2 for his career in playoffs. Marked his sixth career runner-up on TOUR and first since the 2018 Valspar Championship. Became the first player since the tournament moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999 with 100 putts or fewer in a single year (99). One-Putt Percentage of 62.50 percent was the best on TOUR since Bud Cauley at the 2018 RBC Heritage (65.28%).
DP World Tour Championship, Dubai: Notched his sixth European Tour victory at the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, and clinched the 2019 Race to Dubai Rankings Presented by Rolex. A closing 68 included a birdie on the 72nd hole to edge out Tommy Fleetwood by a stroke at 19-under 269. Became the first player to earn four Rolex Series titles and just the second Spaniard to win the Harry Vardon Trophy.
Jon Rahm Rodríguez (born 10 November 1994)[2] is a Spanish professional golfer. Rahm was the number one golfer in the World Amateur Golf Ranking for a record 60 weeks and was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, after which he turned professional. Rahm won three times in 2017, once on the PGA Tour and two Rolex Series event on the European Tour and reached a career-high ranking of No. 2 in the world after winning the CareerBuilder Challenge in January 2018.
On November 1, 2015, Thomas earned his first victory on the PGA Tour by winning the CIMB Classic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, by a single stroke over Adam Scott. He overcame a double bogey on the 14th hole during the final round and holed a six-foot (1.8 m) par putt to claim the win by a stroke. Thomas had earlier shot a course-record 61 during the second round to contribute to a 26-under-par winning score.[9]
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).
One particularly relevant piece of old video that emerged was Reed taking a similar approach in a waste area in 2015 — at the same event. The video was grainy and from the same camera angle, but added support to either side of the story. If you believed Reed’s explanation, this showed that he wasn’t trying to get away with anything — this is just how he approaches waste area shots like this. If you didn’t believe Reed, however, this suggested a pattern of behavior.

After turning professional in June 2015, Schauffele entered the 2015 Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament in fall. He was runner up in first stage at Southern Dunes GC in Maricopa, Arizona. He went on to win second stage at Oak Valley GC in Beaumont, California and ultimately earned his Web.com Tour card in the finals in Florida in a tie for 40th.[9]
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