Prior to his sophomore year, Schauffele transferred to San Diego State University, where eventually he would play out his college career and graduate in 2015. During his three years at SDSU, Schauffele was a Ping and Golfweek Third Team All-American. Scholastically, he was twice awarded the Mountain West Conference All-Academic Team Award. At SDSU, he holds the records for all-time lowest tournament score against par (−17); all-time career scoring average (71.50); as well as the seasonal records for par-5 performance (4.5135); birdies (171) and eagles (9).[6]
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Equaled his own 18-hole tournament record at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship with a final-round 62, his second 62 at Club de Golf Chapultepec in two years, en route to a ninth-place result. Began the final round 16 strokes off the lead before recording 10 birdies. Hit a 457-yard tee shot on No. 10 in the third round, the longest drive of the season on the PGA TOUR. Marked his third top-10 in three starts at the event.

BMW Masters: Finished second to Kristoffer Broberg in a sudden-death playoff at the BMW Masters in Shanghai. Opened with rounds of 71-69-64 and took a one-shot lead on the back nine on Sunday with an eagle out of a bunker on No. 15 followed by a birdie on No. 16. After a bogey on No. 17, finished with a par for a final-round 71 and a 271 total to match Broberg. In the playoff, the Swede drained a 15-foot birdie putt on the first extra hole to claim his first European Tour title.
In his second WGC event, the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Rahm was runner-up to Dustin Johnson in the championship match.[16] Rahm debuted as the No. 21-seed in the field of 64 and went 3−0 in round-robin play, defeating Kevin Chappell 3 & 2, Shane Lowry 2 & 1, and countryman Sergio García 6 & 4. He continued his domination in the round of 16 with a second consecutive 6 & 4 win over Charles Howell III, and then bested that mark when he eliminated Søren Kjeldsen 7 & 5 in the quarterfinals. In the semifinals, he defeated Bill Haas 3 & 2, which set up his rematch with Johnson, who was attempting to win his third straight tournament. In the final, Rahm was 5-down after just 8 holes, but won holes 9, 10, 13, 15, and 16 to get to only 1-down going into the 18th. Both players made par on the final hole of the match and Rahm finished runner-up in his WGC-Match Play debut, which allowed him to ascend to a new career-high world ranking of 14th.
Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
After turning professional in June 2015, Schauffele entered the 2015 Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament in fall. He was runner up in first stage at Southern Dunes GC in Maricopa, Arizona. He went on to win second stage at Oak Valley GC in Beaumont, California and ultimately earned his Web.com Tour card in the finals in Florida in a tie for 40th.[9]

Xander Schauffele is the PGA TOUR’s newest winner. The 23 year-old captured his first victory on tour at The Greenbrier Classic following rounds of 64, 69, 66 and 67, which is good news for all the neutrals out there. Xander isn’t just an exciting young talent, he’s also a genuinely fascinating guy that we’re hoping sticks around for years to come…
Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation: Earned his first European Tour win with a record-breaking victory at the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation. Entered the final day at Portstewart Golf Club with a share of the lead but produced a closing 65 to get to 24-under and win by six shots. Endured a moment during the final round when the correct replacement of his ball-marker was questioned while attempting to remove it from a fellow competitor's putting line, however no breach of the rule was determined. His total in relation to par marked the lowest in the event's history by three shots.
Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation: Earned his first European Tour win with a record-breaking victory at the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation. Entered the final day at Portstewart Golf Club with a share of the lead but produced a closing 65 to get to 24-under and win by six shots. Endured a moment during the final round when the correct replacement of his ball-marker was questioned while attempting to remove it from a fellow competitor's putting line, however no breach of the rule was determined. His total in relation to par marked the lowest in the event's history by three shots.
PGA Championship: At 6-under 278, finished T2 and two strokes behind Justin Thomas at the PGA Championship, marking his first top-10 finish in 16 major championship starts. Had finished T12 at the 2016 Open Championship for his previous-best outing in a major. With his solid play at Quail Hollow, moved from No. 11 to No. 9 in the U.S. Presidents Cup standings. Entered the 72nd hold at 7-under-par and hoping to put some pressure on leader Justin Thomas (who was playing the 17th hole at the time), but a bogey on the par-4 18th hole dropped him to 6-under and an eventual three-way tie for second.
Prior to his sophomore year, Schauffele transferred to San Diego State University, where eventually he would play out his college career and graduate in 2015. During his three years at SDSU, Schauffele was a Ping and Golfweek Third Team All-American. Scholastically, he was twice awarded the Mountain West Conference All-Academic Team Award. At SDSU, he holds the records for all-time lowest tournament score against par (−17); all-time career scoring average (71.50); as well as the seasonal records for par-5 performance (4.5135); birdies (171) and eagles (9).[6]
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Making his first start in a World Golf Championships event, reached 14-under and held the solo-lead in the final round of the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship for a short time after beginning the back nine par-eagle-par-par-birdie-birdie. Missed putts of seven and eight feet on Nos. 16 and 17 for bogeys, which resulted in a 12-under 272 tournament total (T3), two shots behind Dustin Johnson.
Qualified for the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his fifth season and won his 10th PGA TOUR title at the BMW Championship, advancing to the TOUR Championship for the fourth consecutive season and finishing tied for third in the FedExCup standings. Became the ninth player to win 10 TOUR titles, including a major, before turning 27. Was one of two players to finish each season from 2016-17 to 2018-19 in the top 10 of the FedExCup standings, joining Brooks Koepka. Led the TOUR in Par-5 Scoring Average, and at 4.42, recorded the best mark in that statistic since Tiger Woods in 2003 (4.38). Earned seven top-10s and made 18 cuts in 20 starts.
Born and raised in San Diego, California, Xander Schauffele fixed his sights on golf at the young age of 10. His father, a graduate of San Diego Golf Academy (now Golf Academy of America), encouraged his interest and to this day is his only swing coach. Schauffele played golf for Scripps Ranch High School, then Long Beach State University and San Diego State University. Among other early accolades, he won the individual title of the 2011 California State High School Championship and is the 2014 California State Amateur champion.

Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Teamed with Ryan Palmer to claim his third TOUR victory at the Zurich Classic on New Orleans. At 26-under 262, posted a three-stroke win over Sergio Garcia/Tommy Fleetwood. Team sat T17 after first-round 64 in Four-ball format but captured solo lead through 36 holes at 15-under following a 7-under 65 in Foursomes, the first score of 65 or lower at the event in that format. Went on to share the 54-hole lead with Scott Stallings/Trey Mullinax. Only previous appearance at the event before victory was a missed cut with Wesley Bryan in 2018.
Hero World Challenge: In his tournament debut at the Hero World Challenge, won by four shots over Tony Finau. Began the final round in a three-way tie with Finau and Henrik Stenson. Secured the victory with a bogey-free 65 in the final round, his second round without a bogey during the week (round two). Led the field in birdies and recorded the fewest bogeys.
During the third round of the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills, Thomas equalled the U.S. Open single-round record of 63. He eagled the last hole by hitting his 3-wood to 8 feet on the par-5 hole to finish at 9-under-par, also a U.S. Open record, passing the previous record held by Johnny Miller at Oakmont Country Club. In the fourth round, he played alongside Brian Harman in the final grouping, the first time he had done that in a major championship. He shot a three-over-par 75 and finished in a tie for ninth place.

Masters Tournament: Shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 15-under 273 total to win the Masters Tournament by one stroke over Rickie Fowler. Claimed his sixth PGA TOUR title, and first major championship, in his 166th TOUR start at the age of 27 years, 8 months, 3 days. Marked his sixth time holding the 54-hole lead/co-lead on the PGA TOUR and fourth victory in that scenario. Was his first 54-hole lead in a major championship. Was 13-under on the par-5s for the week, two off the tournament record. Win marked his fourth top-10 in a row on TOUR, a first in his career. Became the fourth consecutive first-time major championship winner at the Masters, following Sergio Garcia (2017), Danny Willett (2016) and Jordan Spieth (2015).

Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs and TOUR Championship for the second consecutive season, finishing No. 23 in the FedExCup. Victory at the CareerBuilder Challenge marked his second career PGA TOUR title and one of five top-10s in a season where he made 16 cuts in 20 starts. Also won on the European TOUR. Reached as high as No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking. Earned a spot on the Ryder Cup European team for the first time.

Reed’s answers treaded the middle ground of taking responsibility (“After seeing the video, it’s a two-stroke penalty, I accept that,” he said) and denying any wrongdoing (“I think with a different camera angle they would have realized that … it was not improving the lie because it was far enough away from the golf ball,” he added). If he truly had not improved his lie or intended line of play, it would be no penalty, but he’d accepted the penalty anyway, without objection. Reed was particularly clear on one thing: He did not intend to skirt the rules.
Adept at the long put and renowned as one of the game’s foremost power players and big hitters, Thomas has shot some of the lowest scores in golfing history. In winning his first PGA event, he shot a course record 61, and at the Sony Open in Hawaii in 2017, he shot a 59 and became the youngest player in PGA history to shoot a sub-60 score, going on to win by seven shots. And at the 2017 U.S. Open in Erin Hills in Wisconsin, he equalled that major’s lowest round score, shooting a 63.
No. 11 at Albany is a par-5 that was reachable downwind the first two days of the event. When the win switched for Friday’s round, strategy switched with it, and golfers had to radically change lines to aim further left on the fairway. Reed was among those who ended up missing left of the fairway off the tee; he found himself in the waste area down the left side. Even without any human traffic, these can be treacherous places with inconvenient lies. But Reed had entered the day with a three-shot lead and was playing from the final pairing, which meant a day’s worth of extra imperfections in the wasteland bordering the fairway.
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