Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).
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World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: Fell to Alex Noren in the round of 16 at the World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play. Reached the round of 16 for the second time in his career by defeating Jordan Spieth in one of five matches on the final day of group play in which each player was guaranteed to advance with a win.
Fowler’s view was echoed by tens of thousands of viewers across the world; Reed’s case looked like a cut-and-dry example of skirting the rules, clearing a slightly better path and gaining a small advantage over the field. A violation of the Rules of Golf is always news; that’s true because of the game’s call-your-own-fouls nature. But with Reed, things are slightly different. Fair or not, the golf public (particularly on the internet) are liable to dunk on any Reed misstep, warranted or not. So let’s review what we concretely know about this situation, which quickly turned to golf’s Code Red.
On July 16, 2019, at the 2019 Open Championship, the R&A found Schauffele's driver failed to meet CT test requirements. Schauffele was forced to scramble for a replacement driver. The R&A made 30 random inspections of players' clubs and Schauffele's driver was found to be one of four drivers of the 30 strong sample not to comply with the CT test requirements. The manufacturers brands that had drivers fail the CT test are: Callaway, Ping, Taylormade. It also has become public knowledge, that during a testing in May 2019 at the Diamond Cup Golf event on the Japan Golf Tour, some 15 drivers in the field had failed the very same CT test requirements. Rumors, that Schauffele's driver was the only one and additionally the first one ever to fail the R&A's CT test were proven unfounded and false.[31][32][33]
On January 6, 2019, Schauffele won the Sentry Tournament of Champions at The Plantation Course at Kapalua Resort in Maui, Hawaii.[23] He shot 11-under-par 62 in the final round to pass Gary Woodland, who held a 5-shot lead on Schauffele entering the final round. Schauffele's final round 62 tied the course record at The Plantation Course. He is tied with K.J. Choi (2003), Graeme McDowell (2011), Chris Kirk (2015) and Jason Day (2015).[24]
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Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship: After finishes of second, third, T4, T5 (twice) and T6, finally broke through with a win at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship on the Tour's toughest course of the year. His winning score was 6-under 278, with the field's average score 1.59-over par. Trailed South Africa's Richard Sterne by three shots with four holes to play only to find himself in a playoff after Sterne bogeyed Nos. 15, 16 and 17. A wedge from 75 yards to three feet on the 18th hole at Ohio State University GC's Scarlet Course sealed the victory with both his parents and grandparents in his Sunday gallery. Became the fourth-youngest winner in Tour history, trailing only Jason Day, Patrick Cantlay and Danny Lee.
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Lost to Phil Mickelson with a bogey on the first playoff hole at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship. Sat 11 strokes back after 36 holes before firing a course-record 62 in round three at Club de Golf Chapultepec to pull within four of the lead, then a final-round 64 that was capped by a 119-yard hole-out from the 18th fairway to post 16-under. His weekend score of 16-under 126 matched the best 36-hole score (any rounds) in the WGC-Mexico Championship. Became the first player since Russell Knox in 2015-16 (Won/WGC-HSBC Champions, P2/OHL Classic at Mayakoba) to win one week and lose in a playoff the next.
Reed started his college golf career in 2008 at the University of Georgia in Athens. While at Georgia, Reed had an arrest for underage drinking and possessing a fake ID. He pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor and was put on probation, fined and sentenced to 60 hours of community service.[10] After further issues that resulted in his dismissal from the team,[11] he then left Georgia and enrolled at Augusta State University, where he majored in business.[5][12] He helped lead Augusta State to NCAA Division I titles in 2010 and 2011.[13][14] Reed advanced to the semi-finals of the 2008 U.S. Amateur, where he lost 3&2 to eventual U.S. Amateur champion Danny Lee – the top-ranked amateur in the world.[15] He won the 2010 Jones Cup Invitational.[16]

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Categories: American male golfersAugusta Jaguars men's golfersPGA Tour golfersEuropean Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesOlympic golfers of the United StatesGolfers at the 2016 Summer OlympicsGolfers from TexasSportspeople from San AntonioSportspeople from Harris County, TexasPeople from Spring, Texas1990 birthsLiving people
After the event, Reed was enveloped in controversy. Late on Sunday September 30, 2018, Karen Crouse of The New York Times published an article with quotes from Reed. In the article, Reed questioned Jordan Spieth and U.S. captain Jim Furyk about the breakup of the previously successful Reed-Spieth Ryder Cup pairing. Reed was quoted as saying "The issue's obviously with Jordan not wanting to play with me . . . I don’t have any issue with Jordan. When it comes right down to it, I don't care if I like the person I'm paired with or if the person likes me as long as it works and it sets up the team for success." Reed also described the Ryder Cup pairing decision-making process as "a buddy system" that ignores the input of all but a few select players. Reed also made it clear to Crouse that he lobbied Furyk to keep playing with Spieth, his "first choice." He expected it and was blindsided when he found out Spieth was playing with Justin Thomas.[40]

One particularly relevant piece of old video that emerged was Reed taking a similar approach in a waste area in 2015 — at the same event. The video was grainy and from the same camera angle, but added support to either side of the story. If you believed Reed’s explanation, this showed that he wasn’t trying to get away with anything — this is just how he approaches waste area shots like this. If you didn’t believe Reed, however, this suggested a pattern of behavior.


On April 14, Schauffele tied for second in the Masters Tournament, one stroke behind champion Tiger Woods. After opening with a 1-over 73, recorded rounds of 65-70-68 to finish T2 at the Masters Tournament with Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka. Schauffele's finish at the Masters Tournament represented his third top-five in eight starts at major championships (T5 at 2017 U.S. Open, T2 at 2018 Open Championship, T2 at 2019 Masters Tournament). He led the field with 25 birdies, becoming the third player since 1980 to have 25 or more birdies in a single Masters, joining Phil Mickelson (25 in 2001) and Jordan Spieth (28 in 2015).[25]


Hero World Challenge: In his tournament debut at the Hero World Challenge, won by four shots over Tony Finau. Began the final round in a three-way tie with Finau and Henrik Stenson. Secured the victory with a bogey-free 65 in the final round, his second round without a bogey during the week (round two). Led the field in birdies and recorded the fewest bogeys.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the second consecutive time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the first time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 12 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T6 at East Lake to end his season No. 12 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 10 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, five were top-five showings, including his maiden PGA TOUR victory at the CIMB Classic.
On January 12, Reed won his fourth PGA Tour title at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions by defeating Jimmy Walker in a sudden death playoff.[27] He became just the fourth player in the last two decades to win four times on the PGA Tour before his 25th birthday, the other three were Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio García.[28] The win moved Reed to a career-best OWGR ranking of 14th.[29] Also, he finished second at the Valspar Championship, third at the Hero World Challenge, and seventh at the Honda Classic.[30][31][32] Reed also joined the European Tour for the 2015 season.

Deutsche Bank Championship: Making his third career start at the Deutsche Bank Championship, carded matching middle rounds of 4-under 67 and a final-round, 1-under 70 to T4, seven strokes behind Rickie Fowler. The finish marked his fourth top-10 of the season but first since a playoff loss in March at the Valspar Championship. Later finished T28 at the BMW Championship.
After turning professional in June 2015, Schauffele entered the 2015 Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament in fall. He was runner up in first stage at Southern Dunes GC in Maricopa, Arizona. He went on to win second stage at Oak Valley GC in Beaumont, California and ultimately earned his Web.com Tour card in the finals in Florida in a tie for 40th.[9]

BMW Championship: Recorded first win in 2018-19 at the BMW Championship, the penultimate event of the season. Marked 10th career PGA TOUR victory at the age of 26 years, 3 months, 20 days in his 136th career start, and second FedExCup Playoffs title. Set course record at Medinah Country Club Course No. 3 with a third-round 61, his fourth round of 61 or better on TOUR. Entered the final round with a six-shot lead, which at one point, shrunk to two. Won by three shots over Patrick Cantlay. Marked the seventh of 10 54-hole leads/co-leads on TOUR he converted to victory. Claimed the top spot in the FedExCup standings heading to the TOUR Championship.


Safeway Open: In the season-opening Safeway Open, overcame a 3-over 75 in round one with scores of 66-66-67 to finish T8 with four others at 14-under 274. Marked his second consecutive top-10 in the event having finished T3 in 2015. Before play began, announced that he would be donating $250 for every birdie or eagle made in his first three events of the 2016-17 PGA TOUR season to Convoy of Hope, a disaster-response, non-profit organization providing aid to those impacted by Hurricane Matthew which brought devastation to Haiti, the Bahamas and the southeastern United States. At the Safeway Open, made 23 birdies and one eagle, totaling $6,000 in donations.
On August 28, Reed won the first FedEx Cup playoff event, The Barclays played at Bethpage Black.[33] This was his fifth victory on the PGA Tour and first FedEx Cup event win. He went into the final round in the last grouping, one stroke behind the leader Rickie Fowler. He carded a final round of one-under-par to take a one stroke victory over Emiliano Grillo and Sean O'Hair. The win vaulted Reed to the top of the FedEx Cup standings from 7th position ahead of Jason Day. He also automatically qualified for the Ryder Cup team with this victory.
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Earned 2017 PGA TOUR Player of the Year honors, as voted on by the TOUR's membership, after capturing the FedExCup following a five-win season that included his first major championship victory at the PGA Championship. Other victories came at the CIMB Classic, SBS Tournament of Champions, Sony Open in Hawaii and Dell Technologies Championship. Joined Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth as the only players since 1960 to capture five wins in a season, including a major, before the age of 25. Became the seventh player on TOUR to shoot a 59. In 25 starts, tallied a TOUR-best 12 top-10 finishes (tied with Spieth) with 19 made cuts. Also took home the Arnold Palmer Award as the TOUR's leading money-winner ($9,921,560) and finished third in Adjusted Scoring Average (69.359). Capped off the season by helping lead the United States to an eight-point victory over the International Team at the Presidents Cup.
Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]

Quicken Loans National: Came back to make his professional debut at Congressional CC, holding the first-round lead with a 7-under 64. Closed the week with a final-round 70 to finish T3 at the Quicken Loans National, four behind champion Billy Hurley III. As part of The Open Championship Qualifying Series, his finish earned him a spot at the 145th playing of The Open Championship at Royal Troon. His finish also caught the eye of Quicken Loans National tournament host Tiger Woods, who invited the Spaniard to stop by the 18th green (prior to the winner's trophy ceremony) so he could personally congratulate him on his excellent play at Congressional.
Fowler’s view was echoed by tens of thousands of viewers across the world; Reed’s case looked like a cut-and-dry example of skirting the rules, clearing a slightly better path and gaining a small advantage over the field. A violation of the Rules of Golf is always news; that’s true because of the game’s call-your-own-fouls nature. But with Reed, things are slightly different. Fair or not, the golf public (particularly on the internet) are liable to dunk on any Reed misstep, warranted or not. So let’s review what we concretely know about this situation, which quickly turned to golf’s Code Red.

Reed has had a number of public disputes since coming on the PGA Tour, too: His criticism of Ryder Cup captain Jim Furyk. His complaint about comped seats at Fenway Park. His assertion that Jordan Spieth would have gotten a better drop. His showdown with a noisy camera crew. Reed is pleasant and jovial in day-to-day interactions, but these moments stick out in a sport where it’s easy to stick out.
“I had a little bit of run-in with them, because they only test 30 players. I thought it was a little bit unfair,” Schauffele said after his Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero was dinged on Tuesday. “I would gladly give up my driver if it’s not conforming. But there’s still 130 other players in the field that potentially have a nonconforming driver as well.”

Qualified for the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his fifth season and won his 10th PGA TOUR title at the BMW Championship, advancing to the TOUR Championship for the fourth consecutive season and finishing tied for third in the FedExCup standings. Became the ninth player to win 10 TOUR titles, including a major, before turning 27. Was one of two players to finish each season from 2016-17 to 2018-19 in the top 10 of the FedExCup standings, joining Brooks Koepka. Led the TOUR in Par-5 Scoring Average, and at 4.42, recorded the best mark in that statistic since Tiger Woods in 2003 (4.38). Earned seven top-10s and made 18 cuts in 20 starts.
Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
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