Reed’s answers treaded the middle ground of taking responsibility (“After seeing the video, it’s a two-stroke penalty, I accept that,” he said) and denying any wrongdoing (“I think with a different camera angle they would have realized that … it was not improving the lie because it was far enough away from the golf ball,” he added). If he truly had not improved his lie or intended line of play, it would be no penalty, but he’d accepted the penalty anyway, without objection. Reed was particularly clear on one thing: He did not intend to skirt the rules.
Masters Tournament: Shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 15-under 273 total to win the Masters Tournament by one stroke over Rickie Fowler. Claimed his sixth PGA TOUR title, and first major championship, in his 166th TOUR start at the age of 27 years, 8 months, 3 days. Marked his sixth time holding the 54-hole lead/co-lead on the PGA TOUR and fourth victory in that scenario. Was his first 54-hole lead in a major championship. Was 13-under on the par-5s for the week, two off the tournament record. Win marked his fourth top-10 in a row on TOUR, a first in his career. Became the fourth consecutive first-time major championship winner at the Masters, following Sergio Garcia (2017), Danny Willett (2016) and Jordan Spieth (2015).
Ryder Cup: Made his Ryder Cup debut at Le Golf National in Paris, France and finished the week with a 4-1-0 record, as the Europeans defeated the U.S., 17.5-10.5. Earned four points in the 2018 Ryder Cup and was the leading scorer for the United States Team. Was paired with Jordan Spieth in all four of the team sessions and the duo went on to win three of the four matches. Defeated Rory McIlroy 1-up in the opening Singles match on Sunday.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the second consecutive time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the first time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 12 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T6 at East Lake to end his season No. 12 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 10 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, five were top-five showings, including his maiden PGA TOUR victory at the CIMB Classic. 

Only three weeks later, on July 9, 2017, Schauffele recorded his first PGA Tour victory at the Greenbrier Classic. He started the final round three shots behind leader Sebastián Muñoz, who had led since the first round. Schauffele shot a 3-under-par 67, which included two birdies in his final three holes, to win by one stroke over Robert Streb. With the win, he earned exemptions into the Open Championship, via the Open Qualifying Series, the PGA Championship and the 2018 Masters Tournament.
On January 12, Reed won his fourth PGA Tour title at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions by defeating Jimmy Walker in a sudden death playoff.[27] He became just the fourth player in the last two decades to win four times on the PGA Tour before his 25th birthday, the other three were Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio García.[28] The win moved Reed to a career-best OWGR ranking of 14th.[29] Also, he finished second at the Valspar Championship, third at the Hero World Challenge, and seventh at the Honda Classic.[30][31][32] Reed also joined the European Tour for the 2015 season.
Schauffele began the 2017 FedEx Cup Playoffs 33rd in the standings. Entering the third and penultimate leg of the playoffs, the 2017 BMW Championship, he was 32nd, needing to move up at least two spots to advance to the 2017 Tour Championship. Schauffele played the final six holes of the tournament in 6-under-par with a birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie-par-birdie finish and rose to 26th.[13]
PGA TOUR rookie claimed seven top-10 finishes in 27 starts to earn a berth into the FedExCup Playoffs. At the BMW Championship, the third of four Playoffs events, finished T13 at Conway Farms GC, but came up just five points shy of finishing 30th in the FedExCup standings and moving on to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Ended the season ranked 32nd in the FedExCup standings.
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World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: Advanced to the final in his first appearance at World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play where he lost to Dustin Johnson on the final hole. Was 1-down standing on 18 tee with the honor before hitting tee shot 382 yards over the green. A poor chip and two putts led to a halved hole and handshake with Johnson, who made a regulation par. Was seeking his second TOUR win in 21st career start which would have matched Tiger Woods' achievement. Was the first player from Spain to reach the final. 7-and-5 win over Soren Kjeldsen in quarterfinal matched Daniel Berger's 7-and-5 win over J.B. Holmes in round one as largest winning margin of the week.
The following week, Thomas lost in a sudden-death playoff to Phil Mickelson, at the WGC-Mexico Championship. He had been even par for the tournament after the first two rounds, but then shot 62-64 over the weekend for a total of 16 under par. To finish his final round, Thomas holed his second shot to the 18th for eagle. Thomas lost the playoff to par, after going over the back of the green in the first extra hole and failing to up and down for par. Thomas moved to number two in the world rankings, a career best ranking.

Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fourth consecutive season, making it to the TOUR Championship for the third consecutive time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 2 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T24 at East Lake to end his season a career-best No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 18 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, 11 were top-10 showings, including his first FedExCup Playoffs victory at The Barclays. Eleven top-10s was second only to Dustin Johnson who led the TOUR with 15.


Jon Rahm Rodríguez (born 10 November 1994)[2] is a Spanish professional golfer. Rahm was the number one golfer in the World Amateur Golf Ranking for a record 60 weeks and was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, after which he turned professional. Rahm won three times in 2017, once on the PGA Tour and two Rolex Series event on the European Tour and reached a career-high ranking of No. 2 in the world after winning the CareerBuilder Challenge in January 2018.
Reed’s answers treaded the middle ground of taking responsibility (“After seeing the video, it’s a two-stroke penalty, I accept that,” he said) and denying any wrongdoing (“I think with a different camera angle they would have realized that … it was not improving the lie because it was far enough away from the golf ball,” he added). If he truly had not improved his lie or intended line of play, it would be no penalty, but he’d accepted the penalty anyway, without objection. Reed was particularly clear on one thing: He did not intend to skirt the rules.
On January 12, Reed won his fourth PGA Tour title at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions by defeating Jimmy Walker in a sudden death playoff.[27] He became just the fourth player in the last two decades to win four times on the PGA Tour before his 25th birthday, the other three were Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio García.[28] The win moved Reed to a career-best OWGR ranking of 14th.[29] Also, he finished second at the Valspar Championship, third at the Hero World Challenge, and seventh at the Honda Classic.[30][31][32] Reed also joined the European Tour for the 2015 season.
Rahm finished tied for 27th place in his first Masters and then finished 4th in the Wells Fargo Championship and joint runner-up in the Dean & DeLuca Invitational, results which lifted him into the top-10 of the World Rankings.[17][18][19] Making his debut in a European Tour event, he finished tied for 10th in the Open de France and, the following week, he earned his first European Tour victory by winning the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open by six strokes.[20]
CIMB Classic: Captured first career PGA TOUR event at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia in late-October. Playing in 39th career PGA TOUR event, entered the final round tied with Brendan Steele at the top of the leaderboard after opening 68-61-67. Second-round 61 matched career low (2015 Sony Open, Round 2). Overcame a double bogey on the 14th hole on Sunday, responding with three consecutive birdies on Nos. 15-17 to post a 6-under-par 66 and win by one stroke over Adam Scott, becoming the youngest winner of the event at the age of 22 years, 6 months and 3 days. Also marked fourth consecutive winner on TOUR under the age of 24 dating back to the 2015 TOUR Championship (Jordan Spieth).

On January 12, Reed won his fourth PGA Tour title at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions by defeating Jimmy Walker in a sudden death playoff.[27] He became just the fourth player in the last two decades to win four times on the PGA Tour before his 25th birthday, the other three were Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio García.[28] The win moved Reed to a career-best OWGR ranking of 14th.[29] Also, he finished second at the Valspar Championship, third at the Hero World Challenge, and seventh at the Honda Classic.[30][31][32] Reed also joined the European Tour for the 2015 season.

After speaking to the press, Reed headed to the short-game area for some late-afternoon putting practice alongside Woods (in the background, Bryson DeChambeau neared hour three of his post-round range session). Several dozen spectators looked on, but most were on their way out for the day. The peaceful scene clashed with what was happening on social media, where Reed is considered among golf’s chief villains.
PGA Championship: Angling to become just the second player to successfully defend a PGA Championship crown (Tiger Woods, 2000 and 2007), posted back-to-back 67s on the weekend at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. At 10-under 270, finished T6. Was tied for the lead at one point Sunday, before two bogeys on his last five holes resulted in the T6 showing. Had he won, he would have become the first player to win the week before winning a major championship title since Rory McIlroy in 2014 (WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, PGA Championship).

Sentry Tournament of Champions: Lost to Justin Thomas in a three-hole playoff at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, falling to 2-2 for his career in playoffs. Marked his sixth career runner-up on TOUR and first since the 2018 Valspar Championship. Became the first player since the tournament moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999 with 100 putts or fewer in a single year (99). One-Putt Percentage of 62.50 percent was the best on TOUR since Bud Cauley at the 2018 RBC Heritage (65.28%).


Farmers Insurance Open: Beginning the final round of the Farmers Insurance Open three strokes off the lead at 6-under 210, overcame a bogey at the first hole with four birdies and two eagles to post a 7-under 65 and claim his first career PGA TOUR victory by three strokes over C.T. Pan and Charles Howell III at 13-under 275. Following an eagle-3 at the 13th hole, finished his last two holes birdie-eagle to put an exclamation point on the win. Drained a 60' 8" putt for his second eagle of the day at the par-5 18th hole. With two eagles and a birdie, played the par-5 13th hole on the South Course in 5-under for the week (three rounds). With the win at Torrey Pines, became the second Spaniard to win the Farmers Insurance Open, joining Jose Maria Olazabal (2002). He also became just the fourth international winner of the event, joining Gary Player (1963), Olazabal (2002), and Jason Day (2015).

Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
In February 2018, Thomas won for the eighth time on tour, claiming victory at the Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. He birdied the final hole of regulation play to make a playoff with Luke List. Then on the first extra hole, Thomas made birdie again on the same hole, after a 5-wood from the fairway. List could not hole his birdie putt, after the missing the green to the right, resulting in Thomas winning the tournament. The win lifted Thomas to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and number three in world rankings.[18]
Thomas had another chance to claim the top spot in the world later on in March at the WGC-Match Play, but he was beaten 3 & 2 by Bubba Watson in the semi-finals. He then went on to lose the consolation match 5 & 3 to Alexander Norén to finish in fourth place. The result extended his lead at the top of the FedEx Cup standings and reduced the gap on the world number one, Dustin Johnson.
Schauffele joined the 2018 European Tour as an associate member. With his win at the 2018 WGC-HSBC Champions, Schauffele rose in the European Tour's Order of Merit, the year long points race dubbed the European Tour Race to Dubai, to 4th position.[20] Schauffele entered the European Tour final event, the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, in 5th position. With a final round score of 6-under-par 66, which equaled the lowest score of the day, Schauffele finished T16. This ensured a season-ending 4th position on the Order of Merit and participation in the 2018 European Tour's bonus pool.[21]
Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament: Advanced to Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament Finals by finishing T5 at the second-stage qualifier at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. At Q-School Finals in December, opened with a 67 then slipped to 73-78 in the second and third of six rounds. Rebounded with a 69 the fourth day before firing the third-best set of scores over the last two days, 66-65, which secured him solid eligibility status for the 2014 season.
World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: Fell to Alex Noren in the round of 16 at the World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play. Reached the round of 16 for the second time in his career by defeating Jordan Spieth in one of five matches on the final day of group play in which each player was guaranteed to advance with a win.
At the 2017 Tour Championship, Schauffele birdied the 72nd hole to win by one stroke over Justin Thomas, becoming the first rookie ever to win the Tour Championship. Schauffele's win also marked the first time a rookie has won any FedEx Cup playoff event.[14] The win moved Schauffele to third place in the final FedEx Cup standings, bettering the previous best mark by a rookie held by Jordan Spieth by four positions. The win moved Schauffele to 32nd in the Official World Golf Ranking, up 267 spots from his 2016 year-end finish of No. 299, and gave him a three-year PGA Tour exemption through the 2019–20 season. Schauffele was voted "Rookie of the Year 2017" by his peers on October 2, 2017. He is the fourth member of the high school class of 2011 to earn PGA Tour Rookie of the Year honors, joining Jordan Spieth (2013), Daniel Berger (2015) and Emiliano Grillo (2016).[15]
Reed has had a number of public disputes since coming on the PGA Tour, too: His criticism of Ryder Cup captain Jim Furyk. His complaint about comped seats at Fenway Park. His assertion that Jordan Spieth would have gotten a better drop. His showdown with a noisy camera crew. Reed is pleasant and jovial in day-to-day interactions, but these moments stick out in a sport where it’s easy to stick out.
World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational: Finished T4 at the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational to record his second top-10 in just his third start in a World Golf Championships event, all coming this season. Notched his first top-10 of the season that did not result in a victory. His other two top-10s were both wins, at the Humana Challenge and the Cadillac Championship.
The following week, Thomas lost in a sudden-death playoff to Phil Mickelson, at the WGC-Mexico Championship. He had been even par for the tournament after the first two rounds, but then shot 62-64 over the weekend for a total of 16 under par. To finish his final round, Thomas holed his second shot to the 18th for eagle. Thomas lost the playoff to par, after going over the back of the green in the first extra hole and failing to up and down for par. Thomas moved to number two in the world rankings, a career best ranking.
World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship: Earned his third win in 14 starts, capturing the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship with rounds of 68-75-69-72. That led to a one-stroke victory over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson. His 4-under 284 total was the highest winning total at the Cadillac Championship and equaled Mark McCumber's winning score in 1985 for highest in any event at Doral. At age 23 years, 7 months, 4 days, became the youngest player to ever win a World Golf Championships event, with Tiger Woods (23 years, 7 months, 30 days) the previous youngest with his win at the 1999 Bridgestone Invitational. The win moved him a step closer to Rory McIlroy on the list of players under 25 with multiple wins. Trailed only McIlroy (six) but moved one win ahead of Russell Henley (two) and Harris English (two). Joined Jimmy Walker (three) as the TOUR's only multiple winners of the season, in the process improving his record with the 54-hole lead/co-lead to a perfect 3 for 3 Previously held at least a share of the lead after every round in his two wins this season.
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In the end, Reed took a two-stroke penalty for a triple-bogey 8 on No. 11. He slipped to solo 6th place at 10 under. That’s where he’ll begin Saturday’s final round, three shots back of Woodland’s lead, playing alongside Jon Rahm. He could still win the event — but no matter what happens Saturday, there’s no question he’d like to take back two very costly practice swings.
Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship: After finishes of second, third, T4, T5 (twice) and T6, finally broke through with a win at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship on the Tour's toughest course of the year. His winning score was 6-under 278, with the field's average score 1.59-over par. Trailed South Africa's Richard Sterne by three shots with four holes to play only to find himself in a playoff after Sterne bogeyed Nos. 15, 16 and 17. A wedge from 75 yards to three feet on the 18th hole at Ohio State University GC's Scarlet Course sealed the victory with both his parents and grandparents in his Sunday gallery. Became the fourth-youngest winner in Tour history, trailing only Jason Day, Patrick Cantlay and Danny Lee.
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