He won the Mark H. McCormack Medal in 2015 as the leading player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking, which qualified him for the following year's U.S. Open and Open Championship.[9] He closed out his collegiate career by winning the Pac-12 Conference championship and an NCAA regional championship before finishing tied for third in the national championship. He was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, finishing his final tournament as an amateur in a tie for 23rd place at 7-over-par.[10]
Schauffele began the 2017 FedEx Cup Playoffs 33rd in the standings. Entering the third and penultimate leg of the playoffs, the 2017 BMW Championship, he was 32nd, needing to move up at least two spots to advance to the 2017 Tour Championship. Schauffele played the final six holes of the tournament in 6-under-par with a birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie-par-birdie finish and rose to 26th.[13]
On March 9, Reed won the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral in Miami, Florida.[24] He earned $1.53 million with the one-shot win over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson. Reed became only the fifth golfer to earn three PGA Tour wins before his 24th birthday since 1990, joining Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Sergio García.[25] Jordan Spieth subsequently achieved that feat. Reed is the youngest winner of a WGC event, and the victory also moved him to 20th in the Official World Golf Ranking. Reed was also the first PGA Tour golfer to have three wins before playing in his first major, the 2014 Masters.

Prior to his sophomore year, Schauffele transferred to San Diego State University, where eventually he would play out his college career and graduate in 2015. During his three years at SDSU, Schauffele was a Ping and Golfweek Third Team All-American. Scholastically, he was twice awarded the Mountain West Conference All-Academic Team Award. At SDSU, he holds the records for all-time lowest tournament score against par (−17); all-time career scoring average (71.50); as well as the seasonal records for par-5 performance (4.5135); birdies (171) and eagles (9).[6]
PGA TOUR rookie claimed seven top-10 finishes in 27 starts to earn a berth into the FedExCup Playoffs. At the BMW Championship, the third of four Playoffs events, finished T13 at Conway Farms GC, but came up just five points shy of finishing 30th in the FedExCup standings and moving on to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Ended the season ranked 32nd in the FedExCup standings.
Dell Technologies Championship: After opening the Dell Technologies Championship with an even-par 71, closed with rounds of 67-69-66 to finish T6 and six strokes behind champion Justin Thomas. Has now finished inside the top six in his last three starts at TPC Boston (T4-2015, T5-2016, T6-2017). With his fourth top-10 finish of the season, moved to No. 22 in the FedExCup standings.
PGA TOUR rookie claimed seven top-10 finishes in 27 starts to earn a berth into the FedExCup Playoffs. At the BMW Championship, the third of four Playoffs events, finished T13 at Conway Farms GC, but came up just five points shy of finishing 30th in the FedExCup standings and moving on to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Ended the season ranked 32nd in the FedExCup standings.
Golf Channel’s cameras moved in, too, but hardly got the shot they wanted: Reed was still dripping sweat from a sweltering day in the Bahamas sun and he was severely backlit. The look did Reed no favors with viewers at home. In person, he was composed and had a clear story for his version of what had happened. He had been in an elongated depression, maybe a footprint, and the sand he’d cleared hadn’t actually been in his path. A different camera angle, he said, would have shown something different.
Season highlighted by three wins and a seventh-place finish in his FedExCup title defense. Made the cut in 21 of 23 starts, earning double-digit top-10s (10) for the second consecutive season and reaching 20 top-25s for the first time in his career. Became the first player since Tiger Woods in 2006 and 2007 to lead the TOUR in earnings in consecutive seasons. Accumulated a score of 155-under-par for the season, second-best on TOUR (Dustin Johnson, 189-under). Earned inaugural appearance on the United States Ryder Cup team.
Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament: Advanced to Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament Finals by finishing T5 at the second-stage qualifier at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. At Q-School Finals in December, opened with a 67 then slipped to 73-78 in the second and third of six rounds. Rebounded with a 69 the fourth day before firing the third-best set of scores over the last two days, 66-65, which secured him solid eligibility status for the 2014 season.
Patrick Nathaniel Reed (born August 5, 1990) is an American professional golfer who plays on the PGA Tour and the European Tour. He is notable for his victories in the 2018 Masters Tournament and the 2014 WGC-Cadillac Championship. He has represented the United States in Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup competitions. Because of his success in representing the United States in these team events, he has earned the nickname "Captain America".[3]

Sony Open in Hawaii: Opened the Sony Open in Hawaii with an 11-under 59, becoming the youngest player to record a sub-60 round on the PGA TOUR (23 years, 8 months, 14 days). Added rounds of 64-65-65 for a runaway seven-stroke victory over Justin Rose, earning his fourth PGA TOUR victory (third of the season) in his 74th start at the age of 23 years, 8 months and 17 days. With a 72-hole total of 253, established a PGA TOUR record, eclipsing Tommy Armour III at the 2003 Valero Texas Open (254). History-making week included lowest opening 54-hole score (188; tied with Steve Stricker) and lowest opening 36-hole score (123). With the victory, became the fourth player to win the Sony Open in wire-to-wire fashion (no ties), joining K.J. Choi (2008), Paul Azinger (2000) and Howard Twitty (1993). Became the first player to win the SBS Tournament of Champions and Sony Open in Hawaii in the same season since Ernie Els in 2003, and the 10th to win both Hawaii events at least once during a career.
Golf Channel’s cameras moved in, too, but hardly got the shot they wanted: Reed was still dripping sweat from a sweltering day in the Bahamas sun and he was severely backlit. The look did Reed no favors with viewers at home. In person, he was composed and had a clear story for his version of what had happened. He had been in an elongated depression, maybe a footprint, and the sand he’d cleared hadn’t actually been in his path. A different camera angle, he said, would have shown something different.
Reed shot 69-66 to lead the 2018 Masters Tournament by two strokes after two rounds. He followed up that performance with two eagles on the back nine for a 67 on Saturday. Entering the final round, he led the Masters by three strokes over Rory McIlroy.[37] On Sunday April 8, 2018, McIlroy faltered and Reed fought off the final round comeback bids of Jordan Spieth and Rickie Fowler to win the green jacket, shooting 71 (−1) for a tournament total of 273 (−15).[38] Reed moved up to No. 11 in the world rankings and collected a paycheck of $1.98 million.[39]
Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation: Earned his first European Tour win with a record-breaking victory at the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation. Entered the final day at Portstewart Golf Club with a share of the lead but produced a closing 65 to get to 24-under and win by six shots. Endured a moment during the final round when the correct replacement of his ball-marker was questioned while attempting to remove it from a fellow competitor's putting line, however no breach of the rule was determined. His total in relation to par marked the lowest in the event's history by three shots.

Qualified for the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth time in his fifth season and won his 10th PGA TOUR title at the BMW Championship, advancing to the TOUR Championship for the fourth consecutive season and finishing tied for third in the FedExCup standings. Became the ninth player to win 10 TOUR titles, including a major, before turning 27. Was one of two players to finish each season from 2016-17 to 2018-19 in the top 10 of the FedExCup standings, joining Brooks Koepka. Led the TOUR in Par-5 Scoring Average, and at 4.42, recorded the best mark in that statistic since Tiger Woods in 2003 (4.38). Earned seven top-10s and made 18 cuts in 20 starts.
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.
THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES: Won for the 11th time on the PGA TOUR, winning THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES by two shots over Danny Lee. Earned second victory at the event and fourth in Asia since the start of the 2015-16 season (2015 CIMB Classic, 2016 CIMB Classic, 2017 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, 2019 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES). Became the fifth player to win 11 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth. Made 27 birdies, most in the field. Played the par-4s in 13-under, five shots better than anyone else in the field. Converted the 54-hole lead/co-lead to victory for the eighth time in his 11th attempt. Marked fourth straight top-five on the PGA TOUR, reaching that mark for the first time in his career.
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