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DEAN & DELUCA Invitational: The two-time Hogan Award winner (given annually onsite Monday of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational) trailed 54-hole leader Webb Simpson by four strokes at the start of the final round of the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational. After a bogey on the par-4 third, made five birdies en route to a 4-under 66. Barely missed a 12'2" putt on the last for birdie to force a playoff with Kevin Kisner. Marked his seventh top-10 finish in 14 starts this season, with four inside the top three. Was looking to join fellow Spaniard Sergio Garcia on the list of players to win the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational in their first appearance.
Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]
The Barclays: Held share of 18-hole lead, plus solo 36-hole lead, before entering final round of The Barclays one stroke behind 54-hole leader Rickie Fowler. Playing in the final pairing in the final round with Fowler, was tied with nine holes to play before Fowler bogeyed No. 11. Doubled his lead over Fowler with birdie at No. 12. When Fowler dropped out of contention with a double bogey at No. 16, all he needed was a bogey on the final hole to win by a stroke over Sean O'Hair and Emiliano Grillo, both already in the clubhouse. A plugged lie in a fairway bunker led to a forced lay-up and an eventual two-putt bogey for a 1-under 71 and a one-stroke victory. Earned his fifth TOUR title at age 26, joining Jordan Spieth (21) and Rory McIlroy (23) as youngest winners with five TOUR titles in last 10 years. At No. 7 in the FedExCup standings, entered the FedExCup Playoffs as the highest-ranked player without a win. The Barclays marked his second come-from-behind win, a feat he also achieved at the 2015 Hyundai Tournament of Champions. It was also the third time he went on to win after holding the solo 36-hole lead.
After the U.S. Open, Rahm turned professional, which meant that he forfeited his exemption into the 2016 Open Championship. The next week Rahm played in his first event as a pro at the Quicken Loans National. He held or shared the lead for the first two rounds and finished tied for third place, four strokes behind the winner, Billy Hurley III.[11] The finish was enough for Rahm to regain entry into The Open, as the Quicken Loans National was part of the Open Qualifying Series. Rahm finished tied runner-up in the RBC Canadian Open, securing Special Temporary Member status for the remainder of the season.[12] He gained enough points as a non-member to earn a PGA Tour card for 2017.
Sentry Tournament of Champions: Defeated Patrick Reed and Xander Schauffele in a playoff to win the Sentry Tournament of Champions for the second time, earning his 12th PGA TOUR title at age 26 years, 251 days. Became the third player since 1960 to win 12 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods. Represented his third win in a six-start stretch on TOUR. Joined Stuart Appleby (3), Geoff Ogilvy (2) and Dustin Johnson (2) as players to win the event multiple times since it moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999. Led the field in Birdies (24) and Par-3 Scoring Average (2.75). Improved to 3-1 in his career in playoffs.

World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Equaled his own 18-hole tournament record at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship with a final-round 62, his second 62 at Club de Golf Chapultepec in two years, en route to a ninth-place result. Began the final round 16 strokes off the lead before recording 10 birdies. Hit a 457-yard tee shot on No. 10 in the third round, the longest drive of the season on the PGA TOUR. Marked his third top-10 in three starts at the event.
On March 9, Reed won the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral in Miami, Florida.[24] He earned $1.53 million with the one-shot win over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson. Reed became only the fifth golfer to earn three PGA Tour wins before his 24th birthday since 1990, joining Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Sergio García.[25] Jordan Spieth subsequently achieved that feat. Reed is the youngest winner of a WGC event, and the victory also moved him to 20th in the Official World Golf Ranking. Reed was also the first PGA Tour golfer to have three wins before playing in his first major, the 2014 Masters.

Born and raised in San Diego, California, Xander Schauffele fixed his sights on golf at the young age of 10. His father, a graduate of San Diego Golf Academy (now Golf Academy of America), encouraged his interest and to this day is his only swing coach. Schauffele played golf for Scripps Ranch High School, then Long Beach State University and San Diego State University. Among other early accolades, he won the individual title of the 2011 California State High School Championship and is the 2014 California State Amateur champion.


He won the Mark H. McCormack Medal in 2015 as the leading player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking, which qualified him for the following year's U.S. Open and Open Championship.[9] He closed out his collegiate career by winning the Pac-12 Conference championship and an NCAA regional championship before finishing tied for third in the national championship. He was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, finishing his final tournament as an amateur in a tie for 23rd place at 7-over-par.[10]


Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fourth consecutive season, making it to the TOUR Championship for the third consecutive time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 2 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T24 at East Lake to end his season a career-best No. 3 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 18 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, 11 were top-10 showings, including his first FedExCup Playoffs victory at The Barclays. Eleven top-10s was second only to Dustin Johnson who led the TOUR with 15.
Justin Louis Thomas (born April 29, 1993) is an American professional golfer who plays on the PGA Tour and a former World Number One. In 2017, Thomas experienced a breakout year, winning five PGA Tour events, including the PGA Championship, his maiden major championship, and also winning the FedEx Cup championship. In May 2018, Thomas became the 21st player to top the Official World Golf Ranking.
Waste Management Phoenix Open: Seized the 54-hole lead at the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship by one stroke after rounds of 69-66-66, but faltered on Sunday with a 1-over 72 to finish three back of winner Dustin Johnson. Highlight in round three was a hole-in-one with a 6-iron at the 232-yard, par-3 13th hole. It marked his second ace on the PGA TOUR, following his first at The Greenbrier Classic in 2015.

U.S. Open: Became the fifth player in U.S. Open history to record a round of 63 in the championship, with a 9-under at the par-72 Erin Hills course, marking the 31st 63 recorded in major championship history. Posted a 3-over 75 in the final round to finish T9, becoming one of 16 players who followed a major championship 63 with an over-par round. Also become the fourth of five players who recorded 63 in a U.S. Open to produce an over-par round to follow (Vijay Singh/2003/72, Jack Nicklaus/1980/71, Tom Weiskopf/1980/75, Johnny Miller/1973/final-round). T9 was his first top-10 result in a major championship in his eighth major start.


Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the fifth consecutive time, making it to the TOUR Championship for the fourth time in a row. Ended his season at No. 22 in the FedExCup. Made 25 cuts in 29 starts while posting 15 top-25 finishes, including four top-10s. After at least one victory in each of the four previous seasons, went winless in the 2016-17, with a best result of T2 at the PGA Championship. Played for the U.S. Presidents Cup team at Liberty National, going 3-1-1, losing to Louis Oosthuizen in Sunday's Singles.

Schauffele made his PGA Tour debut at the CareerBuilder Challenge in La Quinta, California. In his first round at the 2017 U.S. Open held at Erin Hills, Schauffele recorded a bogey free 6-under-par 66. This marked the first time in U.S. Open history for a player to shoot a bogey-free round of 66 or better in his national championship debut.[11] Furthermore, Schauffele is one of only 15 players to ever reach 10 under par at a U.S. Open.[12] After his opening 66, he shot rounds of 73-70-69 to finish in a tie for fifth place, earning him an exemption into the 2018 U.S. Open.

CIMB Classic: Captured first career PGA TOUR event at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia in late-October. Playing in 39th career PGA TOUR event, entered the final round tied with Brendan Steele at the top of the leaderboard after opening 68-61-67. Second-round 61 matched career low (2015 Sony Open, Round 2). Overcame a double bogey on the 14th hole on Sunday, responding with three consecutive birdies on Nos. 15-17 to post a 6-under-par 66 and win by one stroke over Adam Scott, becoming the youngest winner of the event at the age of 22 years, 6 months and 3 days. Also marked fourth consecutive winner on TOUR under the age of 24 dating back to the 2015 TOUR Championship (Jordan Spieth).
Farmers Insurance Open: Beginning the final round of the Farmers Insurance Open three strokes off the lead at 6-under 210, overcame a bogey at the first hole with four birdies and two eagles to post a 7-under 65 and claim his first career PGA TOUR victory by three strokes over C.T. Pan and Charles Howell III at 13-under 275. Following an eagle-3 at the 13th hole, finished his last two holes birdie-eagle to put an exclamation point on the win. Drained a 60' 8" putt for his second eagle of the day at the par-5 18th hole. With two eagles and a birdie, played the par-5 13th hole on the South Course in 5-under for the week (three rounds). With the win at Torrey Pines, became the second Spaniard to win the Farmers Insurance Open, joining Jose Maria Olazabal (2002). He also became just the fourth international winner of the event, joining Gary Player (1963), Olazabal (2002), and Jason Day (2015).

Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]

He won the Mark H. McCormack Medal in 2015 as the leading player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking, which qualified him for the following year's U.S. Open and Open Championship.[9] He closed out his collegiate career by winning the Pac-12 Conference championship and an NCAA regional championship before finishing tied for third in the national championship. He was the low amateur at the 2016 U.S. Open, finishing his final tournament as an amateur in a tie for 23rd place at 7-over-par.[10]


“I had a little bit of run-in with them, because they only test 30 players. I thought it was a little bit unfair,” Schauffele said after his Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero was dinged on Tuesday. “I would gladly give up my driver if it’s not conforming. But there’s still 130 other players in the field that potentially have a nonconforming driver as well.”
CareerBuilder Challenge: In first career playoff on the PGA TOUR at the CareerBuilder Challenge, defeated Andrew Landry with a birdie on the fourth extra hole (18th hole) to capture second career victory on TOUR. Moved to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings and No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking with the win. Became the second-youngest winner of the event at 23 years, 2 months, 11 days, behind only Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days). Shot an opening-round 62 at La Quinta Country Club. Was bogey-free in the final round en route to a 5-under 67.
Masters Tournament: Finished fourth in the Masters Tournament at 11-under after a final-round 3-under 69. Advanced to the weekend in a major championship for the sixth time in seven starts. After hitting just 20 of 36 greens in regulation in the first 36 holes, hit 29 of 36 on the weekend at Augusta National and avoided three-putting for 72 holes. With third-round 65, was one of just four players to post a bogey-free round during the week, with each coming in round three (Jon Rahm/65, Rory McIlroy/65, Rickie Fowler/65, Si Woo Kim/68).
Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs and TOUR Championship for the second consecutive season, finishing No. 23 in the FedExCup. Victory at the CareerBuilder Challenge marked his second career PGA TOUR title and one of five top-10s in a season where he made 16 cuts in 20 starts. Also won on the European TOUR. Reached as high as No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking. Earned a spot on the Ryder Cup European team for the first time.

Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament: Advanced to Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament Finals by finishing T5 at the second-stage qualifier at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. At Q-School Finals in December, opened with a 67 then slipped to 73-78 in the second and third of six rounds. Rebounded with a 69 the fourth day before firing the third-best set of scores over the last two days, 66-65, which secured him solid eligibility status for the 2014 season.

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