PGA TOUR rookie claimed seven top-10 finishes in 27 starts to earn a berth into the FedExCup Playoffs. At the BMW Championship, the third of four Playoffs events, finished T13 at Conway Farms GC, but came up just five points shy of finishing 30th in the FedExCup standings and moving on to the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola. Ended the season ranked 32nd in the FedExCup standings.
AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Making his first-ever start at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, followed an opening-round 73 at Spyglass Hill with rounds of 67-67-68 to jump to a T5 finish, seven strokes behind champion Jordan Spieth. Week included a second-round 5-under 67 at Pebble Beach GL, including six consecutive birdies on Nos. 2-7. Played his final 63 holes with just two over-par scores (No. 14 in round two and No. 3 in round four (both at Pebble Beach GL).

Reed told Crouse "For somebody as successful in the Ryder Cup as I am, I don't think it's smart to sit me twice." Reed implied that Tiger Woods was his "second choice". He told Crouse that after he and Woods lost their first match against Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari, Woods apologized to Reed for letting him down. Reed said he told Woods, "We win together as a team and we lose together as a team." Reed told Crouse that "very day [in the team room], I saw 'Leave your egos at the door,'". Referring to the Europeans, he added, "They do that better than us." There has been concern expressed that Reed's public flaming of his teammates and captain will negatively impact on his ability to play on future Ryder Cup and President Cup teams.[40]


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CIMB Classic: Captured first career PGA TOUR event at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia in late-October. Playing in 39th career PGA TOUR event, entered the final round tied with Brendan Steele at the top of the leaderboard after opening 68-61-67. Second-round 61 matched career low (2015 Sony Open, Round 2). Overcame a double bogey on the 14th hole on Sunday, responding with three consecutive birdies on Nos. 15-17 to post a 6-under-par 66 and win by one stroke over Adam Scott, becoming the youngest winner of the event at the age of 22 years, 6 months and 3 days. Also marked fourth consecutive winner on TOUR under the age of 24 dating back to the 2015 TOUR Championship (Jordan Spieth).
Rahm won the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, the final event of the 2017 European Tour season.[22] He was awarded the European Tour Rookie of the Year for finishing as the highest-ranked rookie in the Race to Dubai.[23] However, his award caused a stir among fellow European Tour pros, who felt that it should've gone to a more committed member of the tour. Outside the majors and WGCs, Rahm had played just four regular season European Tour events.[24]
THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES: Won for the 11th time on the PGA TOUR, winning THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES by two shots over Danny Lee. Earned second victory at the event and fourth in Asia since the start of the 2015-16 season (2015 CIMB Classic, 2016 CIMB Classic, 2017 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, 2019 THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES). Became the fifth player to win 11 times before turning 27, joining Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth. Made 27 birdies, most in the field. Played the par-4s in 13-under, five shots better than anyone else in the field. Converted the 54-hole lead/co-lead to victory for the eighth time in his 11th attempt. Marked fourth straight top-five on the PGA TOUR, reaching that mark for the first time in his career.
It was no surprise, then, that Reed drew a poor lie in an indentation in the sand. What was surprising was what happened next: Reed took two practice swings that would face significant scrutiny over the coming hours. On the first practice swing, he placed his club on the sand behind his ball, took it club low and away, and scraped a quantity of sand from behind his ball. His second practice swing was slightly more square to the target, and as he pulled the club away he scraped an additional bit of sand out of the way. It looked pretty cut-and-dry: there had been sand in the way, and Reed cleared a path.
It was no surprise, then, that Reed drew a poor lie in an indentation in the sand. What was surprising was what happened next: Reed took two practice swings that would face significant scrutiny over the coming hours. On the first practice swing, he placed his club on the sand behind his ball, took it club low and away, and scraped a quantity of sand from behind his ball. His second practice swing was slightly more square to the target, and as he pulled the club away he scraped an additional bit of sand out of the way. It looked pretty cut-and-dry: there had been sand in the way, and Reed cleared a path.
Earned 2017 PGA TOUR Player of the Year honors, as voted on by the TOUR's membership, after capturing the FedExCup following a five-win season that included his first major championship victory at the PGA Championship. Other victories came at the CIMB Classic, SBS Tournament of Champions, Sony Open in Hawaii and Dell Technologies Championship. Joined Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth as the only players since 1960 to capture five wins in a season, including a major, before the age of 25. Became the seventh player on TOUR to shoot a 59. In 25 starts, tallied a TOUR-best 12 top-10 finishes (tied with Spieth) with 19 made cuts. Also took home the Arnold Palmer Award as the TOUR's leading money-winner ($9,921,560) and finished third in Adjusted Scoring Average (69.359). Capped off the season by helping lead the United States to an eight-point victory over the International Team at the Presidents Cup.
THE NORTHERN TRUST: Entering the final round with a one-shot lead over Abraham Ancer, carded a 2-under 69 to edge Ancer by one stroke and win THE NORTHERN TRUST for the second time in his career. The win, his seventh on the PGA TOUR, moved him to No. 2 in the FedExCup standings and guaranteed him a spot in the season-ending TOUR Championship. Converted the 54-hole lead/co-lead into a win for the fifth time in seven attempts on TOUR. Became the seventh player to win multiple titles at the event and second to do so in the FedExCup era, joining Dustin Johnson.

Farmers Insurance Open: Beginning the final round of the Farmers Insurance Open three strokes off the lead at 6-under 210, overcame a bogey at the first hole with four birdies and two eagles to post a 7-under 65 and claim his first career PGA TOUR victory by three strokes over C.T. Pan and Charles Howell III at 13-under 275. Following an eagle-3 at the 13th hole, finished his last two holes birdie-eagle to put an exclamation point on the win. Drained a 60' 8" putt for his second eagle of the day at the par-5 18th hole. With two eagles and a birdie, played the par-5 13th hole on the South Course in 5-under for the week (three rounds). With the win at Torrey Pines, became the second Spaniard to win the Farmers Insurance Open, joining Jose Maria Olazabal (2002). He also became just the fourth international winner of the event, joining Gary Player (1963), Olazabal (2002), and Jason Day (2015).

Season highlighted by his first major championship title and sixth career PGA TOUR win. Made 20 cuts in 26 starts with seven top-10s among 12 top-25s. Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the sixth consecutive season and the TOUR Championship for the fifth time in a row. Ended the season at No. 22 in the FedExCup following a 28th-place result at the TOUR Championship. Earned a spot on the U.S. Ryder Cup team for the third consecutive time.
In February 2018, Thomas won for the eighth time on tour, claiming victory at the Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. He birdied the final hole of regulation play to make a playoff with Luke List. Then on the first extra hole, Thomas made birdie again on the same hole, after a 5-wood from the fairway. List could not hole his birdie putt, after the missing the green to the right, resulting in Thomas winning the tournament. The win lifted Thomas to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and number three in world rankings.[18]

It was no surprise, then, that Reed drew a poor lie in an indentation in the sand. What was surprising was what happened next: Reed took two practice swings that would face significant scrutiny over the coming hours. On the first practice swing, he placed his club on the sand behind his ball, took it club low and away, and scraped a quantity of sand from behind his ball. His second practice swing was slightly more square to the target, and as he pulled the club away he scraped an additional bit of sand out of the way. It looked pretty cut-and-dry: there had been sand in the way, and Reed cleared a path.
In February 2018, Thomas won for the eighth time on tour, claiming victory at the Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. He birdied the final hole of regulation play to make a playoff with Luke List. Then on the first extra hole, Thomas made birdie again on the same hole, after a 5-wood from the fairway. List could not hole his birdie putt, after the missing the green to the right, resulting in Thomas winning the tournament. The win lifted Thomas to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and number three in world rankings.[18]
Dell Technologies Championship: After opening the Dell Technologies Championship with an even-par 71, closed with rounds of 67-69-66 to finish T6 and six strokes behind champion Justin Thomas. Has now finished inside the top six in his last three starts at TPC Boston (T4-2015, T5-2016, T6-2017). With his fourth top-10 finish of the season, moved to No. 22 in the FedExCup standings.
Quicken Loans National: Came back to make his professional debut at Congressional CC, holding the first-round lead with a 7-under 64. Closed the week with a final-round 70 to finish T3 at the Quicken Loans National, four behind champion Billy Hurley III. As part of The Open Championship Qualifying Series, his finish earned him a spot at the 145th playing of The Open Championship at Royal Troon. His finish also caught the eye of Quicken Loans National tournament host Tiger Woods, who invited the Spaniard to stop by the 18th green (prior to the winner's trophy ceremony) so he could personally congratulate him on his excellent play at Congressional.
One particularly relevant piece of old video that emerged was Reed taking a similar approach in a waste area in 2015 — at the same event. The video was grainy and from the same camera angle, but added support to either side of the story. If you believed Reed’s explanation, this showed that he wasn’t trying to get away with anything — this is just how he approaches waste area shots like this. If you didn’t believe Reed, however, this suggested a pattern of behavior.
The Honda Classic: Won for the seventh time in his last 31 starts with his second win of the 2017-18 PGA TOUR Season via playoff at The Honda Classic. Defeated 54-hole leader Luke List with a birdie-4 on the first extra hole, improving his playoff record to 2-0. Reclaimed the No. 1 spot in the FedExCup for the first time since winning the 2016-17 FedExCup. Moved to No. 3 in the Official World Golf Ranking, the highest position of his career to date. Became the second multiple-season winner, joining Patton Kizzire.
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.

Categories: American male golfersAlabama Crimson Tide men's golfersPGA Tour golfersWinners of men's major golf championshipsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesKorn Ferry Tour graduatesGolfers from KentuckySt. Xavier High School (Louisville) alumniSportspeople from Louisville, KentuckyPeople from Oldham County, Kentucky1993 birthsLiving people
He began his college career at Long Beach State University under then coach Ryan Ressa. There, Xander garnered Big West Conference Freshman of the Year and First Team All-Big West awards in 2012.. For his sophomore year Xander transferred to San Diego State University to play for the SDSU Aztecs,  where he still holds several seasonal and career records.. After graduating with a degree in Social Sciences in 2015, Xander played Web,com Q-School that same fall.  There he succeeded in securing playing privileges for the 2016 Web.com Tour season.Read More Show Less

Xander Schauffele is the PGA TOUR’s newest winner. The 23 year-old captured his first victory on tour at The Greenbrier Classic following rounds of 64, 69, 66 and 67, which is good news for all the neutrals out there. Xander isn’t just an exciting young talent, he’s also a genuinely fascinating guy that we’re hoping sticks around for years to come…

Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
Thomas had another chance to claim the top spot in the world later on in March at the WGC-Match Play, but he was beaten 3 & 2 by Bubba Watson in the semi-finals. He then went on to lose the consolation match 5 & 3 to Alexander Norén to finish in fourth place. The result extended his lead at the top of the FedEx Cup standings and reduced the gap on the world number one, Dustin Johnson.
Thomas had another chance to claim the top spot in the world later on in March at the WGC-Match Play, but he was beaten 3 & 2 by Bubba Watson in the semi-finals. He then went on to lose the consolation match 5 & 3 to Alexander Norén to finish in fourth place. The result extended his lead at the top of the FedEx Cup standings and reduced the gap on the world number one, Dustin Johnson.
On 7 July 2019, Rahm won the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open at Lahinch Golf Club. Rahm trailed 54-hole leader Robert Rock by five shots heading into the final 18 holes of the tournament. Beginning the round at eight-under overall, Rahm registered four birdies on the front nine to make the turn at 11-under overall and three-under 31 for the day. The 2017 Irish Open champion then shot five-under 31 on the back nine, including four birdies and an eagle, to close out the two-stroke victory.[35]
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