The following week, Thomas lost in a sudden-death playoff to Phil Mickelson, at the WGC-Mexico Championship. He had been even par for the tournament after the first two rounds, but then shot 62-64 over the weekend for a total of 16 under par. To finish his final round, Thomas holed his second shot to the 18th for eagle. Thomas lost the playoff to par, after going over the back of the green in the first extra hole and failing to up and down for par. Thomas moved to number two in the world rankings, a career best ranking.
Patrick Nathaniel Reed (born August 5, 1990) is an American professional golfer who plays on the PGA Tour and the European Tour. He is notable for his victories in the 2018 Masters Tournament and the 2014 WGC-Cadillac Championship. He has represented the United States in Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup competitions. Because of his success in representing the United States in these team events, he has earned the nickname "Captain America".[3]
Schauffele began the 2018 FedEx Cup Playoffs in 28th position in the standings. Entering the third of four events in the playoff series, the 2018 BMW Championship, he was 41st, needing to move up at least eleven spots to advance to the Tour Championship. Schauffele finished in a tie for third to rise to 18th position. That finish allowed him the opportunity to attempt to defend his 2017 Tour Championship title.[18] Schauffele ultimately finished T7 at the 2018 Tour Championship, while placing 15th in the season-long FedEx Cup[19]
Sentry Tournament of Champions: Lost to Justin Thomas in a three-hole playoff at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, falling to 2-2 for his career in playoffs. Marked his sixth career runner-up on TOUR and first since the 2018 Valspar Championship. Became the first player since the tournament moved to The Plantation Course at Kapalua in 1999 with 100 putts or fewer in a single year (99). One-Putt Percentage of 62.50 percent was the best on TOUR since Bud Cauley at the 2018 RBC Heritage (65.28%).

Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Following major earthquakes that hit Mexico City less then six months earlier, pledged to donate $1,000 for every birdie and $3,000 for every eagle he made during the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship, where he finished T20. Funds were distributed to the Mexican Red Cross to assist with earthquake relief for people in need. Made 21 birdies for the week and contributed $21,000 to the fund. His sponsors stepped in to match the contribution, making the final amount $63,000.
On 7 July 2019, Rahm won the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open at Lahinch Golf Club. Rahm trailed 54-hole leader Robert Rock by five shots heading into the final 18 holes of the tournament. Beginning the round at eight-under overall, Rahm registered four birdies on the front nine to make the turn at 11-under overall and three-under 31 for the day. The 2017 Irish Open champion then shot five-under 31 on the back nine, including four birdies and an eagle, to close out the two-stroke victory.[35]
Schauffele made his PGA Tour debut at the CareerBuilder Challenge in La Quinta, California. In his first round at the 2017 U.S. Open held at Erin Hills, Schauffele recorded a bogey free 6-under-par 66. This marked the first time in U.S. Open history for a player to shoot a bogey-free round of 66 or better in his national championship debut.[11] Furthermore, Schauffele is one of only 15 players to ever reach 10 under par at a U.S. Open.[12] After his opening 66, he shot rounds of 73-70-69 to finish in a tie for fifth place, earning him an exemption into the 2018 U.S. Open.
Season highlighted by three wins and a seventh-place finish in his FedExCup title defense. Made the cut in 21 of 23 starts, earning double-digit top-10s (10) for the second consecutive season and reaching 20 top-25s for the first time in his career. Became the first player since Tiger Woods in 2006 and 2007 to lead the TOUR in earnings in consecutive seasons. Accumulated a score of 155-under-par for the season, second-best on TOUR (Dustin Johnson, 189-under). Earned inaugural appearance on the United States Ryder Cup team.
Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
At the 2014 Humana Challenge, Reed set the PGA Tour record for most strokes under par after 54 holes. His rounds of 63-63-63, were 27-under-par. The tournament's first three rounds are played on three different courses. The previous record was 25-under-par, set by Gay Brewer at the 1967 Pensacola Open and tied by Ernie Els at the 2003 Mercedes Championships, Pat Perez at the 2009 Bob Hope Classic (the previous name of the Humana event) and Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic.[21] All four other players won those tournaments. It was also the first time in PGA Tour history that a player opened a tournament with three rounds of 63 or better.[22] Reed won the tournament by two strokes over Ryan Palmer.[23]
Ryder Cup: Made his Ryder Cup debut at Le Golf National in Paris, France and finished the week with a 4-1-0 record, as the Europeans defeated the U.S., 17.5-10.5. Earned four points in the 2018 Ryder Cup and was the leading scorer for the United States Team. Was paired with Jordan Spieth in all four of the team sessions and the duo went on to win three of the four matches. Defeated Rory McIlroy 1-up in the opening Singles match on Sunday.
Schauffele began the 2017 FedEx Cup Playoffs 33rd in the standings. Entering the third and penultimate leg of the playoffs, the 2017 BMW Championship, he was 32nd, needing to move up at least two spots to advance to the 2017 Tour Championship. Schauffele played the final six holes of the tournament in 6-under-par with a birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie-par-birdie finish and rose to 26th.[13]
On August 28, Reed won the first FedEx Cup playoff event, The Barclays played at Bethpage Black.[33] This was his fifth victory on the PGA Tour and first FedEx Cup event win. He went into the final round in the last grouping, one stroke behind the leader Rickie Fowler. He carded a final round of one-under-par to take a one stroke victory over Emiliano Grillo and Sean O'Hair. The win vaulted Reed to the top of the FedEx Cup standings from 7th position ahead of Jason Day. He also automatically qualified for the Ryder Cup team with this victory.
Genesis Open: Entering the final round with a four-shot lead, recorded a 4-over 75 to finish runner-up at the Genesis Open, one stroke behind J.B. Holmes. 54-hole score of 196 matched the tournament record (Mike Weir/2004, Dustin Johnson/2017). Marked the first time he failed to win after posting a 54-hole score of 196 or better (2015 CIMB Classic/196/Won, 2017 Sony Open in Hawaii/188/Won, 2018 WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational/196/Won, 2019 Genesis Open/196/2nd). Led the field in birdies with 23.
Only three weeks later, on July 9, 2017, Schauffele recorded his first PGA Tour victory at the Greenbrier Classic. He started the final round three shots behind leader Sebastián Muñoz, who had led since the first round. Schauffele shot a 3-under-par 67, which included two birdies in his final three holes, to win by one stroke over Robert Streb. With the win, he earned exemptions into the Open Championship, via the Open Qualifying Series, the PGA Championship and the 2018 Masters Tournament.
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.

But then he stepped into the scoring area and stayed there for a number of minutes. Woodland emerged and headed to Golf Channel’s stand-up area to give post-round comments. Reed started to walk out of the scoring area but then was called back in by Slugger White. After another minute, he emerged. A PGA Tour staffer spoke to Reed, who said he would be declining to give an interview on Golf Channel or give official remarks to reporters at the podium. But as a group of reporters looked on, Reed motioned them over and said he was happy to discuss what had happened.
In the end, Reed took a two-stroke penalty for a triple-bogey 8 on No. 11. He slipped to solo 6th place at 10 under. That’s where he’ll begin Saturday’s final round, three shots back of Woodland’s lead, playing alongside Jon Rahm. He could still win the event — but no matter what happens Saturday, there’s no question he’d like to take back two very costly practice swings.
Thomas comes from a long line of professional golfers. His father (who is also his swing coach) served as Head Professional at the Harmony Landing Country Club in Goshen, Kentucky, while his grandfather was a 60-year veteran of the PGA Tour who played in the 1962 U.S. Open. Thomas’s golfing skills were evident early on. Prior to his junior year in high school, in 2009, he amazingly finished third in a PGA Tour event, the Wyndham Championship, where at the age of just 16 years, 3 months, and 23 days he became just the third youngest player in history to make the cut on the PGA Tour. In 2012, while at the University of Alabama, he won both the Haskins and the Nicklaus awards, given annually to the country’s top collegiate golfer, and he turned professional the following year at age 20. He won his first tournament on the Web.com tour in 2014 and registered his first PGA victory at CIMB Classic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2016.
Reed has not spoken to his parents Bill and Jeannette Reed or his younger sister Hannah since he married Justine in 2012.[10] Reed did not invite his parents or his sister to his wedding and only considers Justine's family close. Reed's family has continued to attend tournaments where he played, even after Reed asked security to escort them out of the 2014 U.S. Open.[46][47]
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.

Reed followed his bogey at 11 with another bogey at 12, then found his footing with birdies at 14, 15 and 18 to get back to what he thought was a round of even-par 72. Playing partner Gary Woodland rolled in a 40-footer on the 17th hole and stuck his approach at 18 inside two feet; he posted 13-under to take an apparent one-stroke lead over Reed and Henrik Stenson heading to the final day. Reed would be paired with Tiger Woods in the final round as the two tried to chase down the leaders.


Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
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