Deutsche Bank Championship: Making his third career start at the Deutsche Bank Championship, carded matching middle rounds of 4-under 67 and a final-round, 1-under 70 to T4, seven strokes behind Rickie Fowler. The finish marked his fourth top-10 of the season but first since a playoff loss in March at the Valspar Championship. Later finished T28 at the BMW Championship.
Masters Tournament: Shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 15-under 273 total to win the Masters Tournament by one stroke over Rickie Fowler. Claimed his sixth PGA TOUR title, and first major championship, in his 166th TOUR start at the age of 27 years, 8 months, 3 days. Marked his sixth time holding the 54-hole lead/co-lead on the PGA TOUR and fourth victory in that scenario. Was his first 54-hole lead in a major championship. Was 13-under on the par-5s for the week, two off the tournament record. Win marked his fourth top-10 in a row on TOUR, a first in his career. Became the fourth consecutive first-time major championship winner at the Masters, following Sergio Garcia (2017), Danny Willett (2016) and Jordan Spieth (2015).
Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Teamed with Ryan Palmer to claim his third TOUR victory at the Zurich Classic on New Orleans. At 26-under 262, posted a three-stroke win over Sergio Garcia/Tommy Fleetwood. Team sat T17 after first-round 64 in Four-ball format but captured solo lead through 36 holes at 15-under following a 7-under 65 in Foursomes, the first score of 65 or lower at the event in that format. Went on to share the 54-hole lead with Scott Stallings/Trey Mullinax. Only previous appearance at the event before victory was a missed cut with Wesley Bryan in 2018.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs and TOUR Championship for the second consecutive season, finishing No. 23 in the FedExCup. Victory at the CareerBuilder Challenge marked his second career PGA TOUR title and one of five top-10s in a season where he made 16 cuts in 20 starts. Also won on the European TOUR. Reached as high as No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking. Earned a spot on the Ryder Cup European team for the first time.
Thomas turned professional in 2013 and earned his tour card on the Web.com Tour through qualifying school. He won his first professional event at the 2014 Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship.[8] Thomas finished fifth in the 2014 Web.com Tour regular season, and third after the Web.com Tour Finals, and earned his PGA Tour card for the 2015 season. In 2015, Thomas collected seven top-10s and 15 top-25s, with fourth-place finishes at the Quicken Loans National and Sanderson Farms Championship as his best results. He finished 32nd at the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup, losing the Rookie of the Year award to Daniel Berger.
Two of Schauffele's great-grandfathers played soccer at the European premier level. Johann Hoffmann played for his Austria national football team and won multiple Austrian (SK Rapid Wien), Bohemian (DSV Saaz), and French (FC Sochaux; Racing Straßburg) national titles. After playing football for VFB Stuttgart, Richard Schauffele excelled in track and field, garnering over 40 titles in discus, javelin and shot put for 2 clubs, the Stuttgarter Kickers and the Cannstatter Ruder-Club.

Genesis Open: Entering the final round with a four-shot lead, recorded a 4-over 75 to finish runner-up at the Genesis Open, one stroke behind J.B. Holmes. 54-hole score of 196 matched the tournament record (Mike Weir/2004, Dustin Johnson/2017). Marked the first time he failed to win after posting a 54-hole score of 196 or better (2015 CIMB Classic/196/Won, 2017 Sony Open in Hawaii/188/Won, 2018 WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational/196/Won, 2019 Genesis Open/196/2nd). Led the field in birdies with 23.


Rahm won the Ben Hogan Award in 2015 and 2016, the first player to win it twice.[5] He was also the leading individual at the 2014 Eisenhower Trophy.[6] He competed in the 2015 Phoenix Open as an amateur during his junior year, finishing tied for fifth place, three shots behind the winner.[7] On 1 April 2015, Rahm became the 28th player to be the No. 1-ranked golfer in the World Amateur Golf Ranking. His first stint was for 25 consecutive weeks, after which he surrendered it, regained it, and held it for an additional 35 weeks. His total of 60 weeks spent atop the ranking is the all-time record. While ranked No. 1 in the world, he advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2015 U.S. Amateur before losing to Derek Bard.[8]
Born and raised in San Diego, California, Xander Schauffele fixed his sights on golf at the young age of 10. His father, a graduate of San Diego Golf Academy (now Golf Academy of America), encouraged his interest and to this day is his only swing coach. Schauffele played golf for Scripps Ranch High School, then Long Beach State University and San Diego State University. Among other early accolades, he won the individual title of the 2011 California State High School Championship and is the 2014 California State Amateur champion.
Kessler Karain & 9 other @PresidentsCup caddies made the two newbies Austin Johnson and G.W. Cable karaoke in 2015 Cup and called it their initiation. They bought it and went all out to “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” That and more in my story w Kessler: https://www.thecaddienetwork.com/caddie-kessler-karain-excited-for-presidents-cup-says-he-and-patrick-reed-expect-to-win-every-match/ …
Reed was born in 1990 in San Antonio, Texas. He graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[4][5] While there, he won the 2006 Junior Open Championship and also qualified for the U.S. Amateur in 2007.[6] Reed led University High to state championships in 2006 and 2007, and also won the state medalist honors in 2007.[5] He earned Rolex AJGA All-America honors in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[7][8][9]
After speaking to the press, Reed headed to the short-game area for some late-afternoon putting practice alongside Woods (in the background, Bryson DeChambeau neared hour three of his post-round range session). Several dozen spectators looked on, but most were on their way out for the day. The peaceful scene clashed with what was happening on social media, where Reed is considered among golf’s chief villains.
Hyundai Tournament of Champions: Was clutch down the stretch at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, closing the gap on tournament-leader Jimmy Walker by holing an 80-yard wedge for eagle on the par-4 16th and carding birdies on Nos. 15 and 18 to force a playoff. The former Augusta University standout then drained a 19-foot, 6-inch birdie putt on the first extra hole to improve his playoff record to 2-0, in the process notching his fourth PGA TOUR victory in his 72nd start. Became just the fourth player in the last 20 years to record his fourth TOUR win before age 24 years, 6 months. Also, his four wins is the current benchmark on TOUR for players under the age of 25. Improved his record to 2-0 in playoffs, winning the sixth playoff since the Tournament of Champions moved to Kapalua in 1999. Marked his first come-from-behind win, having held or shared the lead heading into the final round in his previous three victories. Finished with just three bogeys during the week (fourth round on No. 17, second round on No. 7 and second round on No. 8).
Schauffele made his PGA Tour debut at the CareerBuilder Challenge in La Quinta, California. In his first round at the 2017 U.S. Open held at Erin Hills, Schauffele recorded a bogey free 6-under-par 66. This marked the first time in U.S. Open history for a player to shoot a bogey-free round of 66 or better in his national championship debut.[11] Furthermore, Schauffele is one of only 15 players to ever reach 10 under par at a U.S. Open.[12] After his opening 66, he shot rounds of 73-70-69 to finish in a tie for fifth place, earning him an exemption into the 2018 U.S. Open.
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©News Group Newspapers Limited in England No. 679215 Registered office: 1 London Bridge Street, London, SE1 9GF. "The Sun", "Sun", "Sun Online" are registered trademarks or trade names of News Group Newspapers Limited. This service is provided on News Group Newspapers' Limited's Standard Terms and Conditions in accordance with our Privacy & Cookie Policy. To inquire about a licence to reproduce material, visit our Syndication site. View our online Press Pack. For other inquiries, Contact Us. To see all content on The Sun, please use the Site Map. The Sun website is regulated by the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO)
Valspar Championship: At the Valspar Championship, nearly became the season's first multiple winner. Began the final round at the Copperhead Course at 5-under 208, four strokes off 54-hole leader Ryan Moore. Sank a clutch, 31-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole, good for a bogey-free, 5-under 66 and spot in a playoff with Jordan Spieth and 2008 Valspar Championship winner Sean O'Hair. Following solid ups and-downs on the first two extra holes to save par and remain in the playoff, fell victim, with O'Hair, to Spieth's birdie putt on the third extra hole, No. 17. Two years earlier, defeated Spieth in sudden death at the Wyndham Championship en route to his first career PGA TOUR win.
NEW PROVIDENCE, Bahamas — After Rickie Fowler signed for his third-round score at Friday’s Hero World Challenge, he walked out into the media tent to answer a few questions. In the background, a monitor was playing, in slow-motion, Patrick Reed’s practice swings on No. 11, trying to determine whether he had violated a rule while taking his practice swing in a waste area.
PGA Championship: Angling to become just the second player to successfully defend a PGA Championship crown (Tiger Woods, 2000 and 2007), posted back-to-back 67s on the weekend at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. At 10-under 270, finished T6. Was tied for the lead at one point Sunday, before two bogeys on his last five holes resulted in the T6 showing. Had he won, he would have become the first player to win the week before winning a major championship title since Rory McIlroy in 2014 (WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, PGA Championship).
Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Teamed with Ryan Palmer to claim his third TOUR victory at the Zurich Classic on New Orleans. At 26-under 262, posted a three-stroke win over Sergio Garcia/Tommy Fleetwood. Team sat T17 after first-round 64 in Four-ball format but captured solo lead through 36 holes at 15-under following a 7-under 65 in Foursomes, the first score of 65 or lower at the event in that format. Went on to share the 54-hole lead with Scott Stallings/Trey Mullinax. Only previous appearance at the event before victory was a missed cut with Wesley Bryan in 2018.
Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
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